Pumpkin Spice

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  • Are Kents what we call Japs down in Victoria?

    Pumpkin is available in my supermarket all year - all those market gardens in the NT I'm betting. We eat pumpkin all year and my favorite way is baked.

    In a previous relationship, we often ate a butternut pumpkin cut in half, stuffed with a tahini and cashew mixture with other stuff I can't remember and baked. It was a superb meal.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    edited November 2018
    I use buttrnut as it is so much easier to slice than Queensland blue and others similar. Important with arthritis in hands and fingers. I find Kent is watery and has little flavour.
  • It's pretty hard to get canned pumpkin in the UK at all, and it's also pretty hard to get fresh pumpkin in most shops apart from Halloween.
  • Fresh field pumpkins are only available here in autumn—maybe late August or September through November, though they’re most plentiful in October. Many churches and other groups will sell them as a fundraiser.

    Canned pumpkin is in the grocery stores year round here.
  • And you can get cans of pumpkin pie filling, too, with all the spices.
  • chukovsky wrote: »
    It's pretty hard to get canned pumpkin in the UK at all, and it's also pretty hard to get fresh pumpkin in most shops apart from Halloween.

    Try Sainsbury's online as I got two tins from there last week.
  • LeafLeaf Shipmate

    Also some versions of ras el hanout and Chinese five spice. If I'm not careful, I can make different ethnic cuisines all week - Moroccan, Indian, Chinese - and wonder why it all tastes similar, since the spice flavour profiles are very similar.

  • MiliMili Shipmate
    Simon Toad wrote: »
    Are Kents what we call Japs down in Victoria?

    .

    Yes, they are the same type. I actually wasn't sure what they were called as I have only eaten ones I grew myself from a seedling given to me by my sister, so I had to google that too! I have only ever bought butternut pumpkins. Other pumpkin varieties I either grew myself or was given by other people who grew them, or I have bought them cooked from restaurants or fast food places. Despite some of mum's side of the family living in Melbourne since before it was officially a city, I still don't know the local names for some foods that we didn't regularly eat as kids. Recently I read a conversation about Aussie regional names for 'lunch meat' or 'devon' and I have no idea what I thought it was called - I think we just called it sliced meat growing up, but usually ate ham or 'chicken meat' (sliced processed chicken).

    Apparently my mum used to combine two pumpkin pie recipes so we decided it would be easier just to look up a recipe online. I found a couple that are traditional US recipes, but with Australian measurements, but if anyone wants to suggest any good recipes on the recipe thread let me know!
  • I post this from a hotel in Santa Monica. Very low key day including sleeping and going though passport control. Went for a stroll tonight around the shopping/restaurant precinct after dinner. No pumpkins or pumpkin related merchandise on display. Trees look like they are decorated for Civil Christmas. We will do a supermarket visit soon I think. We both love looking for things that seem strange or different in the everyday.

    Spare a thought for the victims of the fires raging in California. I only have to hand the figures for the Camp Fire in Norcal, but they alone are horrific. 23 dead and rising, three firefighters dead, 6,500 homes destroyed. The fire around Malibu and Thousand Oaks looks like a red stain over a substantial bit of a city on the CalFire Map. Please may shipmates not be caught up in this. I will look for other threads to comment further, but these ongoing tragedies will be with both of us as we travel. [votive]


  • I scored a hit at the Getty Restaurant today, a pumpkin themed dish using pumpkin spice was available for entree (main). I'm sorry but I couldn't keep the name of the dish in my head. It has smudged like an early impressionist painting and gives the form but not the detail.

    For art-lovers the Getty is well worth a visit. There's also plenty of views of the city, largely obscured by the haze from the fires for us. We just saw the paintings, but there is plenty of other stuff.
  • We are now in Page Az. The place strikes me as an excellent example of a public sector enterprise (Glen Canyon Dam) breeding and supporting opportunities in a region where very few existed. I bought a t-shirt which I am going to use as a conversation starter on the topic of public sector enterprises at social gatherings.

    The Grand Canyon was another brilliantly run Public Sector Enterprise, although I believe that the actual operations are sub-contracted to an organisation called Xanterra. It is thus a public/private partnership. This is dodgy, and really only acceptable if the beneficial owners of the company are the traditional owners of the land upon which the business operates. Naturally, I am talking out of my arse. We really enjoyed the Grand Canyon, spending a day jumping on and off the shuttle bus to tour the rim, including three hours recovery time before the sunset. Yes, we are THAT unfit.

    @Pigwidgeon your food recommendation was spot on. We ate exclusively at that restaurant in the Bright Angel Lodge and found the food to be of high quality. The service was also excellent save for one night when the servers had a massive fight in the kitchen and went off into little groups to talk things over. Its been about 10 years since I was in a high-conflict workplace and I feel for those people. That is the sort of stress you take home with you. We asked a lad who looked about 16 if he could get our bill amended as there was an error, and he looked at us with his sad eyes as if to say 'You want me to go in there, where all the fighting is?'. Poor kid. An older server took on the duty.
  • I'm so glad you enjoyed the Canyon and the Bright Angel Lodge! Sorry about the kitchen fight -- that sounds really odd and certainly uncomfortable for the diners.
  • Simon ToadSimon Toad Shipmate
    edited November 2018
    Oh no, we were engaged by it, trying to work out what was going on, who was in, who was out. It was really quite entertaining, but at the same time we appreciated that there was hurt happening - personal hurt. We felt for them, but also had a great time. We tipped big too.
  • Maybe Chef Gordon Ramsey was in the kitchen for one of his shows, telling them what they were doing wrong? ;)
  • Ha! Now that would be funny!!

    Had a great experience at a Petrol Station in Page today. I have to go inside to pre-pay as the pumps don't work with my card. I was served by a grumpy Navajo woman, who presented me with a novelty pen with a huge flower to sign the chit. I reacted with surprise and pleasure and asked if there was one I could buy for my wife (Mandy is a pen freak). She said no, and I went out and began to fill up the car. A few moments later the woman came out to the car and gave me the flower pen, before hurrying back inside.

    She wasn't grumpy at all! She was kind and generous, and wore a shell to protect herself. How I wish I had thought to open up my bag and give her a small present in return.
  • Mili wrote: »
    My dad does make a delicious tomato soup cake out of the same recipe book, which has similar spices to pumpkin spice in it, except not ginger.
    I’m trying to think what that might taste of... and failing.

    When I find myself with a pumpkin I steam the flesh and freeze it in 2 cup quantities, as that is what the recipes I have found seem to call for. Now I am dairy free I have to find an alternative recipe to my favourite one in a 1980s Fanny Farmer cook book so am experimenting with alternatives to the evaporated milk it calls for (sadly there seems to be no real alternative), but still using cinnamon, cloves and ginger.

    I found a recipe for delicious (wheat free) pumpkin rolls that used rosemary - that is a combination that surprised me.
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    Simon Toad wrote: »
    Ha! Now that would be funny!!

    Had a great experience at a Petrol Station in Page today. I have to go inside to pre-pay as the pumps don't work with my card. I was served by a grumpy Navajo woman, who presented me with a novelty pen with a huge flower to sign the chit. I reacted with surprise and pleasure and asked if there was one I could buy for my wife (Mandy is a pen freak). She said no, and I went out and began to fill up the car. A few moments later the woman came out to the car and gave me the flower pen, before hurrying back inside.

    She wasn't grumpy at all! She was kind and generous, and wore a shell to protect herself. How I wish I had thought to open up my bag and give her a small present in return.

    I've known a few Navajo people, Some can be reserved, but the folks I've known are good-hearted. That was nice of the lady to give you the pen. Lots of public places use flower pens so people don't absentmindedly put the in their pockets after they've signed.
  • MiliMili Shipmate
    daisydaisy wrote: »
    Mili wrote: »
    My dad does make a delicious tomato soup cake out of the same recipe book, which has similar spices to pumpkin spice in it, except not ginger.
    I’m trying to think what that might taste of... and failing.

    It's similar to pumpkin pie as it has similar spices - it definitely tastes like a cake, not soup!
  • My mother made a tomato soup chocolate cake. Moist and delicious with no taste of tomato. I admit it does sound odd.
  • Sounds similar to that idea of making chocolate cake with beetroot.
  • Tomato soup cake has turned out very tasty. I used cinnamon, clove, ginger.
  • MiliMili Shipmate
    Glad you liked it :)
  • I have some leftover steamed pumpkin (the pumpkin itself came from the wholefood shop) so I'm going to have a look for some pumpkin cookie recipes.
  • And very yummy they are too.
  • Well I'm back home. It felt like I had two holidays, the first being a tourist in the south-west and the second meeting old friends, fictive family and Golden Key. The highlight for me was the Navajo woman who gave me the flower-pen. I imbued the moment with significance, and have refused to donate it to my wife's collection. Instead, it sits by my computer to remind me of a golden moment between strangers who ought never have met.

    A less spiritual moment that I will also remember with fondness was driving through the Castro District in San Francisco and seeing a bloke walking down the street wearing a hat, runners and what I assume was a custom-made penis sock. I believe I will be giggling about that for the rest of my life.

    My host-father is frail. I will be lucky to see him again.
  • MiliMili Shipmate
    Glad you had a great trip, Simon Toad. I made a trial pumpkin pie yesterday. I think my pie dish was a little big, so if I decide to make it again for Christmas I do a bit of maths and increase the amount of filling by about a quarter as the resulting pie is a bit flat. The flavour is delicious though and reminded me why I wanted to put in the effort to learn to make pumpkin pie :) The recipe recommended Kent pumpkins, but I used butternut.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    edited December 2018
    Simon Toad wrote: »
    Well I'm back home. It felt like I had two holidays, the first being a tourist in the south-west and the second meeting old friends, fictive family and Golden Key. The highlight for me was the Navajo woman who gave me the flower-pen. I imbued the moment with significance, and have refused to donate it to my wife's collection. Instead, it sits by my computer to remind me of a golden moment between strangers who ought never have met.

    A less spiritual moment that I will also remember with fondness was driving through the Castro District in San Francisco and seeing a bloke walking down the street wearing a hat, runners and what I assume was a custom-made penis sock. I believe I will be giggling about that for the rest of my life.

    My host-father is frail. I will be lucky to see him again.

    SimonToad, there are many patterns on the net for such things, both knitted or crocheted. Usually found by searching for Willy Warmers. My sons were not sure if I was being serious when I showed them.
  • rofl - thanks Lothlorien :)
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