The "I really like this song" thread

There are songs I really like and am inspired to share. You also might come across a song you like and be inspired to share it.

The Rules:

1. Be kind to the hosts. Limit yourself to one song you really like per moment of inspiration and post.

2. If you feel like explaining yourself or the song, feel free. Please don't feel obliged.

3. I use you-tube to post things. This is not necessary. If you decide not to post a link, please put the name of the artist and the song so people can easily locate it themselves.

4. If you can't remember or discover for sure the name of the artist or the song, please don't post about it in the thread.

5. Please feel free to comment on other's choices with stuff like 'yay, what a great choice' or 'I love that song' or 'Simon Toad I have always thought you were a music guru.' Try not to be negative. People like different stuff.

6. The songs can be controversial, but our comments should avoid that.
Tagged:
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Comments

  • Billy Bragg: No-one Knows Nothing Anymore

    I like the song, I like the sentiment, I like the video, and I like the country and western slide. I really like slide guitar.
  • I love the end-credits music to the movie Little Children, composed by Thomas Newman. (There is an off-chance that some may find the imagery at that link NSFW, so I made it a double-click.)

  • Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host
    My musical taste is very broad and "different". But one that might have wider appeal is 50 Euro to Break Boost.
  • Don't Fear the Reaper, Blue Oyster Cult. Because if I could take on the attitude it describes life would be less anxiety filled.
  • Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Don't Fear the Reaper, Blue Oyster Cult. Because if I could take on the attitude it describes life would be less anxiety filled.

    So a suicide pact is a good way to live life?
  • KarlLB wrote: »
    Don't Fear the Reaper, Blue Oyster Cult. Because if I could take on the attitude it describes life would be less anxiety filled.

    So a suicide pact is a good way to live life?

    I'm thinking more seasons don't fear the reaper, nor do the wind or the sun and the rain

  • "Zueignung (Devotion)," by Richard Strauss, has always touched me deeply. Here it is in two different renditions: as sung by soprano Barbara Bonney and by mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato.

    Here's a translation, courtesy of Lieder.net:

    Yes, you know it, dearest soul,
    How I suffer far from you,
    Love makes the heart sick,
    Have thanks.

    Once I, drinker of freedom,
    Held high the amethyst beaker,
    And you blessed the drink,
    Have thanks.

    And you exorcised the evils in it,
    Until I, as I had never been before,
    Blessed, blessed sank upon your heart,
    Have thanks.

  • KarlLB wrote: »
    Don't Fear the Reaper, Blue Oyster Cult. Because if I could take on the attitude it describes life would be less anxiety filled.

    I've enjoyed a lot of covers by the Band Geeks over the past year. Their Yes covers are something else, but they also do an amazing Closer to the Heart by Rush. AIUI three of the musicians in this clip are sometime members of BÔC.
  • Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host
    KarlLB wrote: »
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Don't Fear the Reaper, Blue Oyster Cult. Because if I could take on the attitude it describes life would be less anxiety filled.

    So a suicide pact is a good way to live life?

    I'm thinking more seasons don't fear the reaper, nor do the wind or the sun and the rain

    I get that there are some good messages in the song, about not fearing death. I used to know a lot of their other stuff, and that their messages are usually very dark.

    DFTR is the most cheerful song about suicide ever. but its subtext I find too disturbing to be a life message. I do like the song as a song though.
  • DFTR is the most cheerful song about suicide ever.
    50:50 with Suicide is Painless?
  • "Mr. Sallack" by the Roches
  • Rossweisse wrote: »
    "Zueignung (Devotion)," by Richard Strauss, has always touched me deeply. Here it is in two different renditions: as sung by soprano Barbara Bonney and by mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato.

    Here's a translation, courtesy of Lieder.net:

    Yes, you know it, dearest soul,
    How I suffer far from you,
    Love makes the heart sick,
    Have thanks.

    Once I, drinker of freedom,
    Held high the amethyst beaker,
    And you blessed the drink,
    Have thanks.

    And you exorcised the evils in it,
    Until I, as I had never been before,
    Blessed, blessed sank upon your heart,
    Have thanks.

    Thanks Rossweisse. I shall have to listen to both versions again. I'm going to hazard an opinion and say I think I like the first version more. It seemed simpler.
  • DFTR is the most cheerful song about suicide ever.
    50:50 with Suicide is Painless?

    Apparently, the lyrics to Suicide Is Painless were written by a 14-year-old, the son of MASH director Robert Altman.

    As for DFTR, I'll try to get things back on a more Heavenly track by registering my surprise that no one has yet made the de rigueur "more cowbell!" joke.

  • Simon Toad wrote: »
    Thanks Rossweisse. I shall have to listen to both versions again. I'm going to hazard an opinion and say I think I like the first version more. It seemed simpler.
    I deliberately offered two very different versions. Some of it is the accompaniment: piano versus full Straussian orchestra. The artists are very different, too. Barbara Bonney is primarily a lieder singer, which calls for a more intellectual way of approaching the music. Joyce DiDonato is primarily an opera singer, which is more about the emotions. Bonney's version at first struck me as too slow, but the more I hear it, the better I like it.

  • Rossweisse, there are so many in the classical repertoire to choose from - English art songs, lieder, traditional songs adapted or arranged, operatic solos. I think I'd have to choose Sav sav susa by Sibelius. The youtube version is sung by the inimitable Jussi Bjorling, but I was lucky enough to hear Birgit Nilsson perform the song in recital in the opening week of the Sydney Opera House. She harnessed that superlative voice with such delicacy in a stark contrast to her Wagnerian performance with Maazel and the Cleveland Orchestra earlier in the week.
  • stetson wrote: »
    As for DFTR, I'll try to get things back on a more Heavenly track by registering my surprise that no one has yet made the de rigueur "more cowbell!" joke.

    Enough cowbell for you on that song?

    (Riche Castellano is the mainstay of Band Geek and current BÖC musician)
  • 'Tis the season, and all that, so I thought I'd mention my favourite Christmas song.

    The choice was between a famous US punk band and G F Handel. For unto us a child is born from Messiah is one that never ceases to have the neck-back hair on end.
  • ...I think I'd have to choose Sav sav susa by Sibelius. The youtube version is sung by the inimitable Jussi Bjorling, but I was lucky enough to hear Birgit Nilsson perform the song in recital in the opening week of the Sydney Opera House....
    Thank you, Barnabas. I will give it a listen! (As a newly hatched professional singer, I found myself standing five feet from Ms. Nilsson in a production of a Wagner opera. I was always a little deaf in that ear for a while afterward.)


  • balaam wrote: »
    'Tis the season, and all that, so I thought I'd mention my favourite Christmas song.

    The choice was between a famous US punk band and G F Handel. For unto us a child is born from Messiah is one that never ceases to have the neck-back hair on end.

    Close call for me between Fairytale of New York (Poges) and I Believe in Father Christmas (Greg Lake) with FoNY just squeaking in. Honourable mention of course to Jethro Tull's various entries.
  • KarlLB wrote: »

    Close call for me between Fairytale of New York (Poges) and I Believe in Father Christmas (Greg Lake) with FoNY just squeaking in. Honourable mention of course to Jethro Tull's various entries.

    There's a beautiful version of "I believe in FC" on the net with Greg Lake playing an acoustic version with Ian Anderson playing flute accompaniment.
  • Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host
    Low - everything they do, but if you want a Christmas son "Just like Christmas". Jingly, but also cool.
  • I love mash-ups, where people are clever and creative with different pieces of music, knitting them together. Ithaca Music do some great ones

    Don't Hold Back was the first one I encountered and is still my favourite.

    (and now I can't watch Star Wars in the same way ever again)

  • i missed the edit window - in case the link doesn't work, could a kind host remove the &list...... part of the URL please ?
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    The link worked just fine for me! :)
  • Wrt DFtR, the Wiki article here https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/(Don%27t_Fear)_The_Reaper has a quote from Buck Dharma saying it's not about suicide at all.
  • That link isn't going to work - try this
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    That link isn't going to work - try this

    Argh! It did when I posted it! Thanks CK
  • I love favourite song threads, they usually show me how out of step I am with the rest of the forum :-)

    I will spare you the huge amount of thrash metal CDs I got for Christmas and propose Holy Diver by Dio. It is over the top early 80s style operatic metal about an alien Jesus with a riff that burns itself into your brain. The video is pretty laughable though.
  • I love favourite song threads, they usually show me how out of step I am with the rest of the forum :-)

    I will spare you the huge amount of thrash metal CDs I got for Christmas and propose Holy Diver by Dio. It is over the top early 80s style operatic metal about an alien Jesus with a riff that burns itself into your brain. The video is pretty laughable though.

    You'd perhaps appreciate my liking of Disturbed's cover of Sound of Silence then.
  • I will spare you the huge amount of thrash metal CDs I got for Christmas and propose Holy Diver by Dio. It is over the top early 80s style operatic metal about an alien Jesus with a riff that burns itself into your brain.

    Great! Another excuse for me to plug cover band Band Geeks aka (in this case) BÖC musicians on their day off.
  • KarlB, Eutychus, that's a DJ Smashie's/Uncle Fluff's "Not 'alf" to the both of you.
  • @Bob Two Owls the quietest band I ever saw was Whitesnake.

    (I think Siouxie and the Banshees was the loudest, with the possible exception of Of Montreal much more recently, at which a PA glitch knocked out a frequency range in my hearing in one ear, leaving me with tinnitis and a strong disinclination to go to any more rock concerts).
  • Oysterband's It's My Country Too I was at the Union Chapel gig too which is on YouTube, and a couple festivals, and they were loud. (I wear ear plugs to go to see bands live now: Alpine Pro plugs from this article)
  • I've liked Kate Bush "Eat the Music" for quite a while.

    https://youtu.be/qM_8vOG-3CY
  • Bellowhead were pretty loud.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    There is just something really hypnotic about this.
  • Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host
    stetson wrote: »
    There is just something really hypnotic about this.

    Thank you for putting THAT song back in my head.
  • stetson wrote: »
    There is just something really hypnotic about this.
    Yes, but I’ve always preferred the version by They Might Be Giants.

    And somehow, it always puts me in mind of this and this. It’s like they’re a set.

    I’ll save the song that’s been stuck in my head—in a good way—for over a month for another post.

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    stetson wrote: »
    There is just something really hypnotic about this.

    Thank you for putting THAT song back in my head.

    What, you got something against Turkish Delight on a moonlit night?

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    stetson wrote: »
    There is just something really hypnotic about this.
    Yes, but I’ve always preferred the version by They Might Be Giants.

    And somehow, it always puts me in mind of this and this. It’s like they’re a set.

    I’ll save the song that’s been stuck in my head—in a good way—for over a month for another post.

    Thanks. I know the TMBG version, in fact, I think it was the first one I heard. Haven't listened to it for a while. When I'm back at an audio computer, I'll give your links a listen.

    For now, I will just observe that Istanbul(not Constantinople) is one of the few songs where the bridge is just as enjoyable as the main part.
  • sionisaissionisais Shipmate
    I'm an unreconstructed Rocker, so The Rolling Stones "Gimme Shelter" always does it for me. The original studio version that is, with Merry Clayton doing the unthinkable and outvoicing Mick Jagger.
  • EutychusEutychus Admin
    edited January 2
    Our grandchildren and their parents have just headed off home, so I couldn't help thinking of There's a kind of hush (all over the world tonight)...
  • 1971, a good year for Lighthouse. One Fine Morning. When everything fell apart I used to sing this to myself.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    stetson wrote: »
    There is just something really hypnotic about this.
    Yes, but I’ve always preferred the version by They Might Be Giants.

    And somehow, it always puts me in mind of this and this. It’s like they’re a set.

    I’ll save the song that’s been stuck in my head—in a good way—for over a month for another post.

    Having just listened to They Might Be Giants, I'm still gonna have to go with The Four Lads version. The slower tempo of the Lads pulls you in more subtly, I find. And the mock-arabesque trappings of TMBG are a little too over the top.

    I'll also say that I like the other two songs you link to, though I never really connected any of the three together. The Murray Head stage-musical number I kind of slate in with some other early 80s stuff, such as this, which I also like.

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited January 2
    And while this probably belongs in a different thread, like maybe Disturbing Stuff That You Really Enjoy, I will say that I'm a big fan of...

    From Whence These Dire Portents Around as sung in The Man Who Knew Too Much, 1956

    I can't find a version with the actual moving images, which you would really need in order to get the true measure of the creepiness. Hitchcock isn't always quite as suspenseful as he's sometimes acclaimed as being, but that particular scene really gives me the shivers.
    CONTEXT: Jimmy Stewart and Doris Day have tracked the location of their kidnapped son to a non-conformist London church that's being used as a front by seemingly left-wing terrorists, and decide to crash the service.
  • Oh well if we're allowed creepy renditions and since I've already introduced the Carpenters, this rendition of 'Close to You' from Mirrormask ranks pretty high up for me.
  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    Blondie's One way or another has to count as a great creepy song.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    As we have turned the corner from 2018 into 2019 and thus survived another year it seems appropriate to share a favourite milestone song: This Year by The Mountain Goats.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited January 3
    balaam wrote: »
    Blondie's One way or another has to count as a great creepy song.

    Oh come on, it's no Brand New Key.

    (I love those baritoned boh-boh-bohs from the background singers.)

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    stetson wrote: »
    And while this probably belongs in a different thread, like maybe Disturbing Stuff That You Really Enjoy, I will say that I'm a big fan of...

    From Whence These Dire Portents Around as sung in The Man Who Knew Too Much, 1956

    In case anyone is interested, the full scene, in all its dreary glory, is here, starting at about 1 :02 :40.

    I'd say that church qualifies as pretty low on the candle.


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