Owl or Lark?

Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host
At Christmas, I always find I revert to my "natural" timing, which is to get up late (10:00) and go to bed fairly late (Midnight yesterday).

So I am, by nature, an owl (late night). This explains a lot, as I have to get up 2 1/2 hours earlier on work mornings, and actually function. Meaning that I also have to go to bed much earlier.

Some people are Larks though - they function really well early in the morning (and will get up naturally early), but have to go to bed earlier.

So which are you? And which are those you have with you this period?
Tagged:

Comments

  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    My natural timing is up at 7am bed at 10pm, asleep by 11pm at the latest.

    No alarms needed. The pups usually disrupt the morning wake up for a few months, and wake up earlier, but at 8 months old my present pup has it just right.

    My only productive work is done in the mornings before midday - after that I’m sluggish of brain.

    I used to be a real lark - up with the dawn, but as I’ve got older I’ve slept in much longer 🙂
  • I'm an owl, but my energy burns out far faster than I would like. So I end up sleeping in like an owl and going to bed around lark time. Much of the time I therefore feel lazy and unproductive.
  • The lark. Up at 4am, meditate, pray, read poetry, journal, have juice and coffee, do t'ai chi, watch the dawn.

    Evenings: yawning by 9pm and in bed before 10pm. Not a party animal.
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    Lark. I sleep badly anyway and on work days am usually up by 5.30. Nodding on the sofa by 8.30pm. I've missed many a TV programme in this way.

    Mr Nen is an owl - I often leave him at his desk in the study when I go to bed and he's still asleep when I leave for work in the mornings. He is always up for going to the midnight service on Christmas Eve, but it's far too late for me. I think I've been to it twice in my whole life and for me it knackers Christmas Day.

    My kids also tend towards the owlish end, my son in law larkish.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    Moderate Owl. Every morning I have to be rudely awakened by the alarm clock as otherwise I'd sleep for a couple of hours past when I need to get up. I don't function until the first coffee and higher brain functions don't kick in until 9am at the earliest.
  • If I have stuff to do then I am a lark, if I don't get the bulk of the work done by lunchtime there isn't much going to happen in the afternoon. If the most I have to do is a bit of mild pottering then I can do that well into the wee small hours. I love pottering and I'm quite good at it, shame it doesn't make me a living like the stuff I have to get up early for.
  • Both!

    I wprled so long with early starts and/or long commutes that the habit of being up-and-doing by 7-7.30 is ingrained. But I also have a natural tendency to get a second wind around 9pm so no early nights either. The answer for me is to have a cat-nap in the middle of the day: 20 minutes around 2 sets me up for the rest of the day.
  • Lark. Out walking and praying at 6 a.m., and consider it the best bit of the day. I cease to function soon after 9 p.m. and have re-timed most church meetings to start at 7, now 7.30 so we can be done by then. Turns out this was a popular move! The Christmas Eve midnight service is one I love for the content but hate for the time (because if I am up that late, I get a second wind and may not sleep at all).
  • balaambalaam Shipmate, 8th Day Host
    A bit of both.

    Which makes me an Ork.
  • Perhaps I'm an Ork too
  • Owl by nature, but these days lark by necessity, I’m afraid.
  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    Definitely Owl. In my college days I set my class schedule so I could sleep til 10. Then I would be up to 2. Can't do that any more alas, but my body keeps trying to.
  • Divided, up between 7 and 7:30 nap between 2 and 3 up until 11:00 asleep by 11:02.
  • Lark, most definitely. Awake by 4 or 5, coffee, meditate, pray, oftentimes take a walk of several miles if the weather cooperates. Hubby a total slug-a-bed until 6….. Now that we’re retired from that silly thing called a “day job” we have a warming bath about 3:30 pm, dinner by 4 or so, and to bed quite often by 7 (after catching the BBC America news)

    Mind you, this has changed over the years! Once upon a time, long ago in a city far away we were up until 10 or 11 each evening. We had good TV reception, of course, and big city day jobs never started until 9. Once we made the move to the country, TV reception became a thing of the past, and the sunlight ruled our days. Now, even though living slightly less remotely, the newly available TV reception (other than BBC) has no allure, and Lark I continue to be!
  • I was an owl when younger but several decades of early starts for nursing shifts, and having children, turned me into a lark. I’m always awake by 7 every day, often an hour earlier.
    I try to be in bed by midnight but my normal bipolar state is hypomania so I don’t sleep much and I have to be strict to achieve this. During the holidays I often go to bed at 2am; I love the still of the night.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    I'm definitely an owl. Being a Piglet of Leisure (i.e. unemployed), I don't have to be up at a given time most mornings, and even when I do, I time it so that I have exactly the amount of time I need to have a shower, get dressed and get to wherever I have to be.

    At the other end of the day, I'm rarely in bed before 1 a.m., although a snoozette may have happened at some point in between.

    Fortunately, D. is as much of an owl as I am; his capacity for dozing off is almost legendary (a friend in Newfoundland used to call him the Dormouse for his propensity for falling asleep at parties), but he'll often go to the office or the Cathedral to work or practise in the wee small hours.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, 8th Day Host
    I'm a lark by nature who had to evolve into an owl by virtue of my first profession as an opera singer. I'm more larkish than I used to be - I'm usually up by 7 - but that can vary day to day. It's good to be versatile.

  • I've found I can be both. Wondering if it is a state of mind and a self-predicting theory. Or if I'm perhaps a weirdo.
  • I am definitely an owl. Asleep by midnight and sleep til 9 or worse. I’ve been owl all my life, but was forced to get up early during my school and work life. Now that I’m retired I am full on owl again.
  • Niteowl wrote: »
    I am definitely an owl. Asleep by midnight and sleep til 9 or worse. I’ve been owl all my life, but was forced to get up early during my school and work life. Now that I’m retired I am full on owl again.

    I was hoping you may be a Lark with such a name :lol:

  • Total lark by nature. For six years, I had a job that began each day at 1 pm and finished at 10 pm. The only way I could survive was to shift things so that I woke up at 11 a.m. each day and had my supper after work. This was pre-internet but thankfully we had a movie network for the t.v. then, so I could watch a movie after supper and not find myself going to bed too early. It was a fairly lonely time of life working six days a week like this.
  • Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host
    I'll be honest, this thread was partially prompted because the working day does seem to favour Larks. And I am an Owl, and don't really function that well having to work standard office hours.

    My wife didn't realise I was an owl. I have had to force myself to be more Lark-like to cope.
  • I'll be honest, this thread was partially prompted because the working day does seem to favour Larks. And I am an Owl, and don't really function that well having to work standard office hours.

    True - but TV schedules favour Owls! :tongue:

  • Boogie wrote: »
    I'll be honest, this thread was partially prompted because the working day does seem to favour Larks. And I am an Owl, and don't really function that well having to work standard office hours.

    True - but TV schedules favour Owls! :tongue:

    Technology makes this more or less irrelevant. The adaptation required of owls is far greater, and imposed with a kind of moralising entitlement which I for one find repugnant.
  • I'm very much an owl, mornings and I do not agree
  • I am most definitely an ork. Or possibly a lawl. If I get up early for any reason, I can be awake and alert and busy with no problem at all and while I'm currently working at home I'm highly motivated to start work at 5 so that I can finish early and have the rest of the day to myself. I definitely work best in the morning. Except if I don't have to. In which case I can sleep in until 10am with no difficulty whatsoever and even then am reluctant to rise from my slumbers.

    A midday napperel is always appreciated.

    Then, come afternoon and evening, I can droop and doze and could happily be in bed by 8 onwards. No use trying to watch tv. But if I go past 10pm, then I can happily stay up and awake and productive until after midnight.

    I guess I just like my sleep !
  • bassobasso Shipmate
    I'm a lark. Always have been. I got up early for years, and now my schedule is even earlier. Up usually at 2:30 (the am one) and in bed at 6 or 7. It's an odd schedule, but it suits me.
  • Boogie wrote: »
    I'll be honest, this thread was partially prompted because the working day does seem to favour Larks. And I am an Owl, and don't really function that well having to work standard office hours.

    True - but TV schedules favour Owls! :tongue:

    Technology makes this more or less irrelevant. The adaptation required of owls is far greater, and imposed with a kind of moralising entitlement which I for one find repugnant.

    It must be morning where you are - I find owls can be very grumpy and uncommunicative in the mornings. :wink:

    No, I never moralise about my larkishness - there is nothing better or worse about being either - ‘tho I do love spending time with a fellow lark and getting a decent conversation for once!

  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    ... The adaptation required of owls is far greater, and imposed with a kind of moralising entitlement ...
    Absolutely, Thunderbunk. We've often been made to feel at best inadequate, and st worst, possibly a bit degenerate, when we tell people that we're rarely in bed before midnight, as though there was some virtue in going to bed early*.

    * OK, there's the bit in Proverbs about "early to bed and early to rise", but who reads Proverbs these days?
  • Piglet wrote: »
    * OK, there's the bit in Proverbs about "early to bed and early to rise", but who reads Proverbs these days?
    I think you may be confusing Proverbs with Ben Franklin. :wink:

  • I used to be an owark...late to bed but early to rise, but now I have transitioned to full lark. Well, not an early a lark as basso, but still up early and now in bed early.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Piglet wrote: »
    * OK, there's the bit in Proverbs about "early to bed and early to rise", but who reads Proverbs these days?
    I think you may be confusing Proverbs with Ben Franklin. :wink:
    You may well be right. :blush:

    I always assumed it was a real, actual Proverb (with a capital "P"), maybe because it was a favourite saying of my granny's - but I'm open to correction!
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    Started as an owl but morphed into a lark about age 40.
  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    Yes, definitely becoming more larky (or, at least, less owly) as I age. Unlike my wife.

    And (like Piglet's D.) good at dropping off "whenever" - mind you, that's nothing new.
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    Piglet wrote: »
    ... The adaptation required of owls is far greater, and imposed with a kind of moralising entitlement ...
    Absolutely, Thunderbunk. We've often been made to feel at best inadequate, and st worst, possibly a bit degenerate, when we tell people that we're rarely in bed before midnight, as though there was some virtue in going to bed early*.

    There are downsides to being a lark. I've missed many programmes and films that Mr Nen and I were planning to watch together as a cosy evening in, and conversations with friends we've had round to meals, because I've dozed off partway through. I know it appears rude and people can be pretty irritated by it, not realising you've been awake since 5am. If we have evening plans I do try to have a rest in the day, but it isn't always possible.

    Like Boogie I don't moralise about it. Our natural sleep cycles are what they are.
  • I am the nearest thing my family of larks get to an owl. By most peoples' standard, I am a lark but I take my time getting going.
  • I am an owl, but for many years I had a lark's job. I coped by setting a timer to go to bed and three alarm clocks for the morning (the final one on the far side of the room) and getting up at the same time 365 days a year. The only benefit was watching the sun rise for a lot more of the year than I do now.
  • Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host
    The reason my wife doesn't see me as an owl is that I tend to head for bed the same time each day (whether I am working or not), unless I have an extended period off. I don't adjust well to changes.
  • Lark. Mrs Rogue is an owl but as she works night shifts her identity in this respect can get very confused.

    I agree that the "normal" working day favours the lark and am all for people exploring what hours suit them best. Some organisations would cope better than others with this flexibility but I reckon that if they really gave it a go those who initially think "no way" might be surprised.

    The wide difference between larks and owls knocks the fuss over daylight saving into insignificance but that is a biannual hell call that I won't pre-empt in December.
  • RuthRuth Admin Emeritus
    Neither. I awake naturally at sunrise, whenever that is; I've recently bought myself a light that comes on gradually with a timer, so I've artificially moved sunrise to 6:30 am this winter. If I didn't have to work, I'd nap every afternoon and stay up late. Since I can't do that, I go to bed 7-8 hours prior to sunrise. If I spoke the language better and knew people there, I'd think about retiring to Spain.
  • AdeodatusAdeodatus Shipmate
    I am such an owl, owls greet me in the street like a long-lost owly relative. Usually go to bed about 1am, maybe read a bit, rarely up before 10am unless I really have to be. (And if I have to be, expect grouchiness. And possibly furballs.)
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    Adeodatus, you're a man after mine own heart! :smile:
  • I am an owl who lives with an even owlier owl. 1am is an early night for us. We struggle to get up at 8.00 and rely on multiple alarms. Sometimes doze in front of the TV in late evening but then I get up and find things to do which delay bedtime. Not proud of this lifestyle but seem to be stuck in a rut.
  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited January 5
    That must be very difficult.

    I can very easily drop off at any time ... much to my wife's annoyance!
Sign In or Register to comment.