Hearing Aids Pros and Cons

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Comments

  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    I calculate that given the cost of batteries, I need only live another 118 years to make my money back on the hearing aids.
  • caroline444caroline444 Shipmate
    edited June 26
    @Firenze I wish you longevity! :grin:

    I've only had my regular NHS hearing aids for a couple of months, but there are a couple of situations where I find it very hard to hear even when wearing them.

    - When people who don't enunciate well speak on the phone (I know phones are notorious for poor transmission.)
    - At morning prayers, (which is my usual service.) Do other people find it hard to hear in rooms with very high ceilings? I can't hear a word of any of the readings.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    High ceilings are an acoustic killer. Long ago, when my hearing was fine, I used to attend work meetings in a room in a historic building. It was not that large, but nevertheless I could barely hear the half dozen people I was sitting round the table with.

    And don’t get me started on those who, if they have to address a room, direct their remarks to the floor or the side wall while MUMBLING.
  • caroline444caroline444 Shipmate
    Firenze wrote: »
    High ceilings are an acoustic killer. Long ago, when my hearing was fine, I used to attend work meetings in a room in a historic building. It was not that large, but nevertheless I could barely hear the half dozen people I was sitting round the table with.

    And don’t get me started on those who, if they have to address a room, direct their remarks to the floor or the side wall while MUMBLING.

    Ah, thank you, that was very helpful! I was wondering if I had done the hearing test incorrectly, but it's obviously just an acoustic thing.

    Ha ha, I too am not a fan of mumblers (or people who talk very quietly). Grrrrrrr! :rage:
  • Caroline, if your place has a loop system and your aids have a 'T' setting, you'll get 'dry' speech from the mic with no room reverb all over it making intelligibility more difficult. It can help a lot.
  • caroline444caroline444 Shipmate
    @mark_in_manchester Thank you for that. I'm pretty sure we don't have a loop system in the chapel where we meet for morning prayers, but it's something to bear in mind for the future.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    Mumblers are bad indeed, but so are those who gabble on and on. Words run into each other and are unintelligible too.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Loop systems are wonderful. Our new library has them fitted. The church did too, until the quakes damaged it. :angry: :anguished:
  • Huia - I recommissioned a loop system for our church. The loop itself is often buried in the walls, floor etc, and might have been broken by the earthquake - but it doesn't have to be buried. Getting someone handy to experiment with a piece of wire run round the walls of the space might get you in action again - just a plain wire, which is connected to the output terminals of the special amplifier which drives the loop itself.
  • Just make sure that the wire doesn't run near any other wiring. At the local church the bodgers ran the hearing loop and sound wires through with the lighting and all I could then hear when the sound system was on was the lighting feedback. Unfortunately for me it was too high pitched for the bodgers who were old and deaf and refused to believe me.
  • Graven ImageGraven Image Shipmate
    edited June 27
    Does anyone use recharge hearing aid batteries? Looks like they cost about $80.00 for charger and batteries but might be worth it in the long run, also less of a recycle problem. I read they were good for 5 years. That seems a very long time.
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    Mine use rechargeable batteries and I am quite satisfied. Charging unit came with the aids so I don't know what the cost would be separately. Also I don't know how long the batteries will last, but the aids have a three year warranty.
  • My aids are a Siemens model which is a sealed unit with inductive recharging. Warranty 3 years, expected battery life 5 years. Just pop the aids into the charging unit when I go to bed and they are ready to be inserted when I get up in the morning. As our national scheme allows for replacement of aids every five years, I am anticipating that the batteries will not need replacing. I'm also hoping that in five years' time advances in technology will mean that rechargeable aids are free to pensioners. Even though there was substantial subsidy and insurance refund, there was still a co-payment of almost $500 on these.
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