Far flung southern lands 2019

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  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    The ferry trip to Matiu Somes Island is great too. I think you might come across a tuatara there nowadays; it has a fascinating history but now it's a wildlife reserve.

    Indeed. The ranger at Matiu/Somes said to us "The longer you stay the more you see" when we said we intended to skip the next ferry "back" and take the one after it.
    Lots of spots you can just sit and listen to the waves sunk in your thoughts (or even not thinking at all).
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Piglet wrote: »
    Huia wrote: »
    ... Happy voting today Australia. Hope the sausage sizzles go well.
    Indeed - wishing you wisdom and a desirable outcome!

    (I know the square root of zilch about Aussie politics, so I'm not sure what a "desirable outcome" will be).

    I could say "sure as hell not what they got" but that would be all political on a friendly thread :scream:

    The Right and its Politics of the Self continues to hold sway. I weep.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Indeed.

    Matiu/Somes has been added to the list for my next weekend trip to Wellington. May combine Kapiti Island and Matiu/Somes when I have a few days off.
  • Climacus wrote: »
    Indeed.

    Matiu/forbine Kapiti Island and Matiu/Somes when I have a few days off.
    The first time I went to Kapiti we were still allowed to feed the birds; the kaka would perch on your head or shoulders and the wekas would pop up and follow you. I think it must have been on a later trip that I was old enough for daughter's boyfriend to assume when I sat down on a seat before the last stretch up to the summit that I would wait for them there. "Don't worry," said my daughter, "she'll make it to the top", and I wouldn't have missed it, because the seaward side of Kapiti is not what you'd expect unless you've been told.
    The outline of Kapiti from the shore has been part of my landscape from my earliest days; we camped at Raumati South the summer after I turned two, and my Dad bought the section where we built a bach where we spent most of our holidays for many years.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    I grew up on the Kāpiti Coast coast, and my frail elderly mother still lives at Raumati Beach ... (the property where I grew up has been swallowed up by the motorway, and the house was carted away to Levin 30 years ago). I've been over the the island a couple of times and it is quite spectacular ... quite spectacular
  • Both those picture links are missing the colon
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited May 2019
    I think this should fix those links - it seems to be very easy to get one more "http:" than you need.
    Zappa wrote: »
    ... it is quite spectacular ... quite spectacular

  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Once when I flew from Rotorua to Wellington the plane flew lower than usual over Kapiti - it was amazing.

    We had a holiday in Raumati South about 49 years ago and I have wanted to visit Kapiti since then, but never organised myself to do so.

    The film Second Hand Wedding starring Miranda Harcourt had some brilliant shots of Kapiti.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Thanks for the memories GG, Zappa and Huia. I need to get there.

  • Huia wrote: »
    The film Second Hand Wedding starring Miranda Harcourt had some brilliant shots of Kapiti.
    I've seen the movie, made on the Kapiti Coast. Screenplay was by Linda Niccol, the daughter of old family friends, who lives there, with Nick Ward. Her brother Andrew Niccol is a Hollywood screenwriter and director (Gattaca and The Truman Show among others). A very creative family. Good heavens — I remember their grandmother (a school friend of my mother's) and their great-grandmother.
    That reminds me: it's time I paid a visit to their mum and dad.
  • A more dramatic polling day for me and those around me than I would have wished. I have been booth captain for our party for many years. On Saturday morning I had just opened the box of how to vote cards when I realised I had left my hearing aids at home in the next street.
    "I'll just duck home and get them" I said to my colleagues. I woke up in a bed in the acute cardiology ward.
    Apparently I went into cardiac arrest, was caught by our local State MP before I hit the ground who then commenced CPR. A worker from a rival party and an electoral official then took over until paramedics arrived and shocked me twice to defibrillate.
    Then to the ER, where the cardiologist immediately had me transferred for catheterization and insertion of a stent to a blocked coronary artery.
    Today I am up and walking. I give thanks to divine providence for this sequence of events. If I had left the booth just a minute or so earlier this tale could not have been written.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Prayers for a solid recovery. And thanks for the good timing
  • LothlorienLothlorien Glory
    edited May 2019
    Prayers,Barnabas. Scary stuff.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    {{{Barnabas}}}

    Wishing you a full and speedy recovery!
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    My goodness. So thankful you are okay.

    Warmest wishes from across the ditch for a speedy recovery. Take care.
  • Hazard reduction smoke is worst it has been for a week. It is like thick fog here and I can see only half the front yard which is admittedly large. Road and footpath are invisible. I will be staying inside today unless a wind picks up and disperses the smoke. There has been a hazard reduction burn on the highway at Glenbrook. Then a major burn was started at Lawson Ridge and into a lot of valleys which have had no fire in them for years. I can’r even see a blurry outline when a car goes past.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Crikey, Loth - that's not very good!
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Piglet wrote: »
    Crikey, Loth - that's not very good!

    Well, no - it is good. It means that undergrowth and such debris as fallen branches, even twigs, are being burned under some control at a time of year when there's limited danger of the fire getting away. It's called hazard reduction and minimises the danger of severe bushfires in the summer months. The Blue Mountains have deep ravines and fires race up the steep sides to burn houses along the ridge tops. The area where Lothlorien has moved to has experienced several severe fires over the last twenty years and this sort of burn will reduce risks.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Hope you and those round you suffer no ill effects...

    Thicker where Loth is, but the photo here may give an indication of the (albeit more-dramatic-than-usual I think) effect to those for whom back-burning is not a thing.
  • Barnabas — happy that your experience ended so well. Go well!
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Piglet wrote: »
    Crikey, Loth - that's not very good!

    Well, no - it is good. It means that undergrowth and such debris as fallen branches, even twigs, are being burned under some control at a time of year when there's limited danger of the fire getting away. It's called hazard reduction and minimises the danger of severe bushfires in the summer months. The Blue Mountains have deep ravines and fires race up the steep sides to burn houses along the ridge tops. The area where Lothlorien has moved to has experienced several severe fires over the last twenty years and this sort of burn will reduce risks.

    I am down the better end of the toad. Further towards Richmond had 113 houses destroyed a few years ago in a fire started by timber across the wires. Lack of proper good maintenance by electricity powers that be was the finding by enquire.

    This place was built in 1977 and I can see trees with burns on trunks. A long time ago. Fires are always dangerous, even in a so called safe area. Sparks can be carried by wind kilometres ahead of any blaze. We have both huge rain tank and a pool with pump to service them. Clear area around house.

    Blue Mountains have the gum trees which are responsible for the colour from the oil in their leaves. The area is called mountains but geologically that is wrong. It is a flat plateau thrust up from an ancient sea. Mostly sandstone and as GG says, the ravines are deep. Actually the ravines are cracks. Marine fossils here.

    Fire is part of life here and it is only now that more attention is being paid to Indigenous use of fire for survival. In other words survival of life.



  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Ah - my mistake - I was imagining that it was accidental or environmental fire, and consequently a Bad Thing.

    Thanks for the explanations.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    $5 prescription charges! My goodness. Surely this is a land flowing with pills and potions...

    Doctor was a tad more expensive, but $5 for a course of drugs is pretty good. Thank you NZ.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    If you choose have then dispensed at a pharmacy in a Countdown supermarket they usually charge $3.00. I use stand alone pharmacy because I can talk to the Pharmacist there quietly, besides which they sell my favourite bath salts and shower gel and it's a good excuse to stock up.
  • Climacus wrote: »
    $5 prescription charges! My goodness. Surely this is a land flowing with pills and potions...

    Doctor was a tad more expensive, but $5 for a course of drugs is pretty good. Thank you NZ.
    Once you have had more than 20 prescriptions dispensed in a year the rest are free. In our youth we didn't always get to the free ones, but in later years with spells of serious health problems we got there much sooner. The year starts at the beginning of March.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Barnabas, I somehow missed your post. I hope you are recovering well. I'm glad you had so many competent people around you to help.
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host
    edited May 2019
    (Barnabas)
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    edited May 2019
    Thank you Huia and GG. Not that I'm trying to take all I can get from you NZers 😁, but just so I know: is the after-20-free after 20 in total or 20 of one prescription? I am on 3 medications currently, so it would be easy for me to reach 20 total.

    Continued best wishes Barnabas.

    Anyone want to see an albino magpie? Quite chatty and likes to be handfed.
  • Climacus wrote: »
    Thank you Huia and GG. Not that I'm trying to take all I can get from you NZers 😁, but just so I know: is the after-20-free after 20 in total or 20 of one prescription? I am on 3 medications currently, so it would be easy for me to reach 20 total.
    Each prescription, but repeats as indicated on the prescription don't count. For some of mine I get 3 months' supply; others monthly with two repeats.
    I think I may have made a mistake — The 'year' may end at the end of January,not February.
    In middle age we looked forward to the end of the charges in December or even November; then as we got older and more health issues arose we'd be going free in May or June. Now that there's only one of me and a major problem's been dealt with (spinal stenosis op.) I last longer.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    The way they calculate this has changed since I first learnt the system so I suggest you check it out with your pharmacist, they should have a handy little info sheet. I always go to the same place for continuity of service. I rely on them to keep track for me. You can get a print out of the meds they have dispensed at any time.

    My nephew has just been on the phone raving about the Natural NZ display at Te Papa (National Museum of NZ). Whatever I else I do when I go to Wellington in August this is not to be missed.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    edited May 2019
    Thank you both again.

    Yes, Natural NZ looks great. I just missed it when I was down for last block course. As I'm a tad closer to Wellington than you :wink: , I'm planning a day visit after my last assignment is handed in and before my exam as a treat.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Ouch, Barnabas ... lokk after yourself ... Foaming Draught went through that a couple of years back
  • Thanks everyone for prayers and good wishes. Came home from hospital late Thursday after taking almost all day to be discharged. Still have chest wall pain from 20 minutes of CPR and voice is almost gone from intubation, but they will cure with time. Our local hospital happens to be the rehabilitation facility for the surrounding local health network, so I will be referred to their excellent cardiac rehab program.

    There was no history, except my weight and general fitness, which would indicate this was coming - blood pressure was normal, oxygen saturation was high [only checked the Monday prior]. Some breathlessness which the GP put down to a diagnosis of respiratory syncitial virus some months ago - perhaps that masked the deterioration.

    It appears that a piece of plaque ruptured from the artery wall and blocked the artery leading to the left chambers of the heart causing immediate arrest, with the result already mentioned upthread.

    I am banned from driving for the next six months due to the arrest, pending medical assessments at that time, so lots of community things will go on the backburner. We are meant to travel to the southwestern part of the state for the enthronement of another dear friend, but that will depend on the doctor's permission and Mrs BA's ability to drive the distance. Otherwise, rest and rehabilitation.

    I give thanks to God for all that has happened to allow me to continue to offer a life of service to Him and to my family and community.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Take it easy, BA, and get well soon!
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Overall, that's very good news. Take it easy. Any idea you don't mind sharing as to why the bit of plaque detached as it did?
  • This is apparently the most common cause of sudden cardiac arrest. As to why, I had been doing much lifting and carrying over the previous two days. Whether that additional exertion had caused the rupture I am uncertain.
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host
    Rest and heal well, Barnabus.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    You were very lucky it happened as it did - assuming that it was going to, take it very easy and don't rush.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Take care, Barnabas. Thank you for sharing the news and updates. God bless.

    Sorry to be suggesting things, but is a bus or train a possibility for the travel? Or is the general recommendation to stay at home?
  • Climacus, you know our trains, I guess.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    edited May 2019
    I was a regular on the 8 hour delight that was Sydney to Albury... And then add 2.5 or so hours to Newcastle. I do confess that I sometimes stumped up for the exorbitant (distance vs cost) Sydney to Newcastle Rex flight -- barely enough time to sneeze before you've landed -- and flew from Albury to Newcastle via Sydney.

    There's a whole lot of environmental films being screened around here at locations as diverse as theatres and church halls over the coming month. I suspect they may have a greater pull than my assignments do. :disappointed:
  • Climacus wrote: »
    Take care, Barnabas. Thank you for sharing the news and updates. God bless.

    Sorry to be suggesting things, but is a bus or train a possibility for the travel? Or is the general recommendation to stay at home?

    As you would know from your former residence in the Riverina, Griffith gets one train per week, and the prospect of a connecting coach from Cootamundra does not appeal. We are looking at a two-day trip each way, with about four hours on the road each day, thus reaching our accommodation just about check-in time, so we can both rest after the journey. We'll be there for about four days, so plenty of rest in between.

    All dependent upon my follow-up appointment later in the week. If the advice is stay at home, someone else from the parish will have transport the gift of cope and mitre.

    Taking things very carefully at present, trying to rebuild strength.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Barnabas, I hope you have several good books or that you have some other quiet hobby so you don't get bored.
  • Thanks Huia, I finished a Lindsey Davis Falco mystery while in hospital, and have Howard Jacobson's Shylock is my Name on the table beside me, with heaps of non-fiction to open once I can focus a little more effectively.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    It would not be easy to undertake the Griffith journey from the Hunter, even if in good health. Not only the 8 hour journey from Sydney (does it still entail a change at Junee?) but first you have to get to Sydney Central. Then there's the journey into Newcastle/Broadmeadow to catch a Sydney train, that section of the journey taking 2 1/2 hours. The transport may be public but convenient is not an accurate description of it.
  • @Lothlorien has any of the white stuff made it down as far as you?
  • LothlorienLothlorien Glory
    edited May 2019
    No, Barnabas. Too low . I have seen it to Lawson, once quite a substantial fall, but here is too low. I would rather have the white stuff than the extreme gales we have had.

    This area has a fairly temperate climate but the arrival of cold after such a lot of general heat has been a shock to the system, especially when wind comes north from Alpine snow. It is now 2:38 am and temp outside is just 5.

    Stop laughing, Piglet!
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    The forecast here is for 21C. Very unusual for this time of year. Although I've lived here for almost 30 years I still find warm winds really weird.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Lothlorien wrote: »
    ... It is now 2:38 am and temp outside is just 5.

    Stop laughing, Piglet!
    :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

    It's actually a lovely day here: 16° and sunny. Optimum Piglet Temperature. I think, after having had very nearly six months of snow, we've earned some nice weather!
  • Indeed. I went back to sleep and the temperature went down so more. Not too bad now but I hope the gale does not come back. That cuts several degrees off it.

    New aircon has been tested and works well. Old system seemed to have been installed and ducted by an expert in jigsaws. New system started when the smoke from burning off by RFS left smoke worse than a heavy fog. It cleared the house and kept it clear. We will probably turn it off till solar power is back reinvigorated as then aircon will not use grid power. In the meantime we look forward to relighting the Jotul stove.
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