Far flung southern lands 2019

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  • Got it:IKEA APOLOGIZES FOR LEAVING NEW ZEALAND OFF WORLD MAP AFTER ANNOUNCING PLANS TO EXPAND INTO THE ISLAND NATION.
  • IKEA - they hit the news (link) for selling a map missing New Zealand. It apparently happens regularly - but this one was particularly enjoyable as IKEA are about to open their first store in NZ.
  • On that, do you know about the NZ government's not found page?

    e.g. https://www.govt.nz/shipoffools

    ---

    So sorry to read, MaryLouise. Please keep us updated as you can. Love and thoughts from NZ.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    GG - It was sold by Ikea, who have recently announced intentions to build a store in Auckland. They have apologised, probably because it was a PR blooper.

    Personally I think they should be made to sell the Wizard of Christchurch's map of the world that shows NZ at the top to show true repentance. :wink:

  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I have enough trouble getting my head round your seasons and ours being backwards and your north being warmer than your south - if they start putting you at the top of the map I'll be really confused.

    :confused: :blush: :confused:
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    I came out of my room this morning to find nasty yellow light, similar colour to bushfire smoke. Dust, heavy dust. Very strong winds from west here yeserday. Combine them with drought and exposed earth and many tonnes of good earth are now probably in Tasman Sea, if not enriching NZ lands.
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host
    Thanks for the supportive comments --

    @Gee D this isn't easy to put in a nutshell. Here's a compressed and partial explanation, others please scroll on by.

    It’s an election year in South Africa (8 May) and political tensions are running high, but we should be careful about attributing to a conspiracy what could be explained by incompetence. The unbundling and restructuring of state-owned power utility Eskom is long overdue and it is in calamitous debt.

    This week Eskom cut electricity supplies to prevent total collapse of the grid as unscheduled maintenance reduced output. Load-shedding (power black-outs) at stage 4 is a measure of last resort to protect the power system and this is shutting down the economy, disrupting essential services and causing traffic gridlock.

    Eskom’s plants are in breakdown due to neglect, skimping on paying for maintenance or upgrades, shocking project management, unskilled mangers running power stations etc. The coal-fired generating plants Medupi and Kusile, supposed to add 9 600 megawatts to the grid and be fully operational by 2015, are still years away from completion and have substandard flaws in construction. There is not enough power being generated to keep the country connected and live.

    So we have another day of eight or nine hours without electricity. And even if there’s a major bail-out of Eskom and power is restored for a while, the problem (like water shortages and food insecurity) isn’t likely to be resolved any time soon.

    As a freelancer I can't afford to hire a generator, so am missing print deadlines for international clients and will struggle with delayed or cancelled payments. Minor compared to what others are facing.
  • Oh my, MaryLouise. One does not realise how lucky one is until reading what you and your fellow citizens are going through. I am sorry, and hope for a quick resolution.

    I attended my Welcome to the University session today, which started with a Pōwhiri. I found it very moving, and it made me more determined to undertake some Māori culture and language studies. I was a bit nervous about the Hongi (pressing noses), but apart from one miss it went okay.
  • Piglet wrote: »
    I have enough trouble getting my head round your seasons and ours being backwards and your north being warmer than your south - if they start putting you at the top of the map I'll be really confused.

    :confused: :blush: :confused:

    Piglet, I've stayed in a substantial brick farmhouse built for a sheep station owner who came out in the 19th century and had it designed for him by an architect back home. The local builders followed the plans exactly, not thinking to alter the orientation, which had the biggest windows and verandah facing south.

    This equates with an equally inexcusable but entirely local misorientation where a new house was designed for the principal of a school; before it could be built the Education Department sold the section and bought another on the other. side of the road. The two bedrooms and lounge with their big windows around a verandah (never used) faced south and the scullery (not even the big kitchen) alone got the sun.

    And while we're on the subject: I love to show off a street in our suburb which had been drawn on a map with a ruler in the UK, and laid out as drawn: right down the side of a high steep hill. The bottom part is a path by a stream; above that less than 100 metres of straight flat roadway, after which it does a dog-leg up the hill and then goes straight up as one of the steepest streets in the city (a friend teaching another friend to drive, many years ago, took her there to practise hill starts), and finally it zigzags up to the top of the hill.

    I love my city. Yes, I was born here.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Climacus wrote: »
    I was a bit nervous about the Hongi (pressing noses), but apart from one miss it went okay.

    Fascinating in that it echoes much of the biblical "breathing life into" (Genesis and post resurrection-John). I find it helpful to understand it as sharing the sacred space between two souls.

    MaryLouise ... such difficult times. :cry:

    The rexories have just floated past my window. Off to see them shortly.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    {{{MaryLouise and your countrymen}}}
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Thank you MaryLouise - I can't remember seeing anything in the press here about it.
  • Neither do I. And I don't recall it on the World Service either (I listen each night).
    Zappa wrote: »
    Climacus wrote: »
    I was a bit nervous about the Hongi (pressing noses), but apart from one miss it went okay.

    Fascinating in that it echoes much of the biblical "breathing life into" (Genesis and post resurrection-John). I find it helpful to understand it as sharing the sacred space between two souls.

    Indeed. Reading about it more after I posted I was struck by that. The text on the uni website says, "The tradition of the hongi recalls the Māori legend of the creation of the first earthly woman, Hineahuone. Creator god Tane, formed her from clay and then breathed life into her nostrils."

    Hope you had fun with the rexories!

  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Tell him he is missed.
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host
    It's always a mystery what makes it to international attention and what doesn't.

    Some local links from reliable enough sources. Here we go for anyone interested enough to follow up --
  • I was just about to post here asking if Zap made the jump to the new ship, when I saw he is not only here, but an Ecclesiantics host! I clearly don't come here enough.
    I thought I saw Foaming Draught was back. Still here? Is Clarence? And rexory?
    Really good to see Climacus posting here, I remember you from ye olde times on the ship.
  • And I you.

    FD came back with the same initials but a different name, and soon stirred the pot up. 🙂

    I'm sure I've seen Clarence.
  • MaryLouise wrote: »
    It's always a mystery what makes it to international attention and what doesn't.

    Some local links from reliable enough sources. Here we go for anyone interested enough to follow up --

    Forecast losses of 20.2 billion? Wow. Not to mention all the pain and suffering you and the residents are going through. Thanks for the information and the links.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Thanks MaryLouise, I'd not seen any of that in the paper here. Scary times ahead.
  • MaryLouise wrote: »
    It's always a mystery what makes it to international attention and what doesn't.

    Some local links from reliable enough sources. Here we go for anyone interested enough to follow up --

    {{{Thinking of you, and your country}}}
  • The numbers are.....sobering. I have no idea how such circles can be squared, but my heart and prayers go out to those caught in the middle. Sounds like, as always, you may be forced to pay more for less, which, well.....
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Thanks for posting the links MaryLouise. Our international news had nothing I could find - too busy reporting on the latest reality show.
  • Spent 6.5 hours walking, sorry, tramping 😉, up in the Ruahines yesterday (Rangiwahia Hut for those who know the area). Absolutely stunning. No idea what they are all called -- need to research -- but it is amazing to see the different sorts of shrubs and trees. The scenery was amazing to see, especially when I was walking along the tops of the hills. A bit rough on the feet coming down the longer path, but worth it.

    Some people I met told me come back in winter when there is snow.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    If you want to find out more about flora and fauna, Andrew Crowe has written some helpful books which are not to big to put in your pack (and not too expensive if they fall out). My youngest brother is a tramper and has also had a voluntary job showing people around an area of untouched native bush near his home and he recommended them to me.
  • Thanks Huia -- I'll look them up.
  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    I was staying in a hotel with a posh gym this weekend. I really enjoyed some virtual 'tramping' in New Zealand's national parks. I.'do love to do it for real one day.
  • rexoryrexory Shipmate
    Home yesterday after almost a fortnight cruising around NZ, including a wonderful day with Zappa and his (far) better half. Trouble is that we're now on NZ time in our heads. It's 3 am and we're wide awake and drinking tea. I guess we'll readjust soon.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    I hope you manage it Sarasa. Because I grew up with it, the smell of a lowland beech forest after rain is one that always raises my spirits. (and because beech grows in areas of relatively high rainfall that seems to be most of the time).

    After I got hearing aids I remember the absolute joy of hearing a bell-bird yelling at us from a nearby branch, a sound I had missed for years.


    I wish I was walking in that cool moistness today rather than the 31c forecast here today.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I could offer you some coolness, Huia - it's -8° here. Maybe we could metaphorically meet in the middle - whoever had the idea of evening out the temperature a bit around the globe was on to a good thing!
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    Back up around 40°C here in much of Sydney yesterday. We have had some cooler nights , so the increase again was unwelcome.
  • Sounds wonderful, rexory. Welcome home.

    O-week here. Lots of students milling around and making the place look untidy. 😉 No, good to see the place buzzing. I became a student also (Masters) and start this Friday with a visit to Wellington.
  • Sarasa wrote: »
    I was staying in a hotel with a posh gym this weekend. I really enjoyed some virtual 'tramping' in New Zealand's national parks. I.'do love to do it for real one day.

    That sounds very posh! As per Huia, hope you get to make it here too. It is a beautiful country.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    edited February 20
    An entertaining start to the work day...

    A colleague came back from Malaysia and brought back some durian-flavoured popcorn (those of you familiar with the durian and its intense odour know where this is going...). Within a minute of it being opened, people in the (large) office were asking if there was a gas leak. I walked past someone with several popcorns in my hand (they were delicious) and they identified it as durian immediately with a disgusted look on their face.

    My colleague instantly sealed up the packet in a plastic container and put it in a cupboard.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host

    I was just about to post here asking if Zap made the jump to the new ship, when I saw he is not only here, but an Ecclesiantics host! I clearly don't come here enough.
    I thought I saw Foaming Draught was back. Still here? Is Clarence? And rexory?
    Really good to see Climacus posting here, I remember you from ye olde times on the ship.

    Hello DK!

    Yeah I'm here but not as often as I would like - life gets in the way. I know Clarence posts from time to time - surely the bubbly beer didn't get into trouble again?

    Posting from NZ's Tasman region right now, and often on the road all over the place.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Hi Zappa, does that mean you have been near the fire zones?

    The grass here is tinder dry and I'm hoping we don't get a repeat of the Port Hills fire. We do have some possible heavy rain forecast (fingers crossed) but every time I look at the long-range forecast is seems less is expected. I'd settle happily for a couple of days steady, but not heavy rain as the Council hasn't finished dredging the river and it still floods upstream.
  • rexoryrexory Shipmate
    Climacus wrote: »
    An entertaining start to the work day...

    A colleague came back from Malaysia and brought back some durian-flavoured popcorn (those of you familiar with the durian and its intense odour know where this is going...). Within a minute of it being opened, people in the (large) office were asking if there was a gas leak. I walked past someone with several popcorns in my hand (they were delicious) and they identified it as durian immediately with a disgusted look on their face.

    My colleague instantly sealed up the packet in a plastic container and put it in a cupboard.

    Wonderful, Climacus! I remember the hotels in Singapore all had notices warning "No durian allowed".
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I'm glad that the durian is missing from my culinary education - why on earth would anyone want to eat something that smells like a gas leak?

    I know people eat some fairly pungent cheeses*, but I'm not sure I understand that either ... :confused:

    * my own whiff-tolerance stops at mild Stilton.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    edited February 21
    It is an odd fruit -- though it stinks to high heaven I've been told the fruit is very pleasant to the taste and creamy in texture (I've only had it in flavoured sweets in which the taste is pleasant).
  • When I was up north we had fine days and some rain at night. Just the way it should be.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Huia wrote: »
    Hi Zappa, does that mean you have been near the fire zones?

    Just over the hill, though smoke was blowing away from were I was (Nelson first, then Roto-iti) most of the time. A few monsoon buckets still flying, and local word was the fires were generally burning beneath the ground now ... which is a bit of a problem.

    With my Australian background it was something of a shock to head back south yesterday and drive past whole paddocks of golden wheat stubble burning merrily, no one present to supervise (near Oamaru).
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    PS ... we had durian growing in our Darwin garden.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    When I was up north we had fine days and some rain at night. Just the way it should be.

    Camelot weather.

    As to durian - the stench is incredible, but the taste very pleasant and sweet. A brave person who first ate durian
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Yay, rain! Not very heavy yet, just enough to wet the concrete. Today's forecast maximum temperature is 15c . :grin:
  • A bit warmer here, but not much, and the lovely rain was falling in the morning.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    edited February 24
    Actually I misremembered the forecast here: warmer, by 1° -- 16°C.

    And the rain has returned.
  • The best they can offer us is 13° but we haven't got there yet; meanwhile it's 11° and "wear 4 clothing layers and one windproof"
    I had difficulty choosing clothes for church, not having worn anything other than light summery stuff for so long.
  • Zappa wrote: »
    I was just about to post here asking if Zap made the jump to the new ship, when I saw he is not only here, but an Ecclesiantics host! I clearly don't come here enough.
    I thought I saw Foaming Draught was back. Still here? Is Clarence? And rexory?
    Really good to see Climacus posting here, I remember you from ye olde times on the ship.

    Hello DK!

    Yeah I'm here but not as often as I would like - life gets in the way. I know Clarence posts from time to time - surely the bubbly beer didn't get into trouble again?

    Posting from NZ's Tasman region right now, and often on the road all over the place.

    Hi Zappa,

    I was looking for Welease Woderwick last night. Has he joined the new ship? The WW name doesn't come up in searches apart from seeing prayers for him on the prayer thread.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    Wodders has been ill. He is much missed in host lounge and on general boards. Will send you PM
  • Back from an excellent weekend in Wellington, Te Matatini on Saturday and the Terracotta Army at Te Papa today. I hadn't realised that the TA includes not only soldiers of all ranks, but also terracotta bureaucrats. For some reason, that tickled me no end.

    The performances at Te Matatini were glorious, and the history of the event was fascinating. So glad I got the chance to go.
  • Sounds wonderful!

    I headed down to Wellington Thursday night for an all-day class for my Masters (predominantly online). I looked for accommodation before I left and there was almost nothing. Managed to secure a hostel room for Thursday night. A google revealed the The Matatini Māori performing arts festival. I'll have to book early for 2021!

    Agree with the fascination of the terracotta bureaucrats!
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