Far flung southern lands 2019

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  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Oh my! Too much of a good thing...

    Hope you enjoyed the "toxic yellow sludge" (!) MaryLouise.

    I'm having a grand old time in Rotorua. A very beautiful city, if a bit smelly from the geothermal activity :smile: , but plenty to do and see, and learn (a lot of Māori culture/history).
  • Grandson has been away for a week and we served him some venison leftovers. He loved it. He is a foodie as the rest of us here are, so I knew he would like it Best thing is that we have more here to use
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    I lived there for 7 years Climacus and I never really got used to the smell. It was interesting though and I met some lovely people. Moving to Christchurch was so different.

    When I lived in Rotorua it wasn't unusual to sit in a café and hear people speaking Maori, whereas the Christchurch population at the time was more Pakeha - the city was described as "the most English City in NZ" and most of the trees were from England. That was in 1987.

    Since then Christchurch has definitely become more multi-cultural. Also Ngai Tahu* have a much more obvious presence ( and about time too.) In my opinion one of the best changes, which has mainly happened since the quakes is that more native trees and other vegetation have been planted.

    * the local iwi (or tribe - which is the closest word in English).
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    It is a beautiful city, and I have noticed far more Māori than in Palmy. It is lovely to hear it in the streets, and I visited a village (one where some Māori live, but set up for tourists) today and learnt a bit, which was wonderful.

    A blessed and joyous Easter to all of those south of the equator, and any Northern visitors too.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Climacus have you visited Ohinemutu? It is by the Lake. There is an Anglican Church with Maori carvings and an etched glass picture of a Maori Christ that has the lake as a background, so he is pictured as walking on water.
  • That sounds lovely, Huia.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    I did, Huia; I attended St Faith's there on Easter Sunday. The church was stunning, as was its location -- set by the lake and with geothermal steam rising not far away and which you passed on the walk there. The window you mentioned was breathtaking.

    The village itself was closed for tourists on Sunday: understandably. When I return I will go back.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    I had forgotten the name, but St Faith's was it. When wwer on holiday in Rotorua some years earlier they had someone in the Church all the time as tourists had taken the paua shell out of the eyes of the carvings as souvenirs. Disgusting behaviour.

    I'd like to go back there sometime. I did make a quick visit in 1992, and even then there had been quite a few changes.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Huia wrote: »
    ...they had someone in the Church all the time as tourists had taken the paua shell out of the eyes of the carvings as souvenirs. Disgusting behaviour.
    :astonished:

    Wow. That is disgusting behaviour. I cannot believe anyone thought that acceptable. The mind boggles. But thank you for the name of the shell used...I was unaware.

    For anyone interested, here is St Faith's shrouded in geothermal steam and the glass Christ Huia mentioned can be seen at the bottom of this page. Some of the inside can be seen here.
  • AnzacDay tomorrow down here for Australia and NZ.

    A poem by Dame Mary Gilmore written in June 1940 at the beginning of WW II.https://australianculture.org/no-foe-shall-gather-our-harvest-mary-gilmore/

    Seems we may not have lost wars but meekly surrendered resources and wealth. Times have changed

    Lest we forget.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Interesting footnotes to that poem: I didn't realise that "Anzac" had any other meaning than the acronym for Australia and New Zealand Army Corps, but was also a place name.

    You learn things on the Ship ... :smiley:
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    It is informative indeed!

    Lovely poem; thanks, Loth.

    I wandered by the 9am service in the Square. Some encouraging and edifying, and informative, speeches (including one by a secondary school girl whose grandfather served in the Tongan forces) and beautiful music. Very much a focus on solemn reflection and remembrance, and a call to understanding and tolerance -- particularly after the terrorist attacks in Christchurch.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Climacus wrote: »
    ... the Square

    You'll have seen my "church of origin" there .... I believe it is to be restored
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    I have indeed... Shut currently for earthquake proofing, and looking also at some changes to various bits according to the notices. Looks lovely from the outside.

    Just heard about the deadly floods in Durban ... Hope all is well with you and those you know, MaryLouise.
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Thanks, Climacus -- I really enjoyed looking at the images of St Faith's.

    Yes, the floods around Durban in KwaZulu-Natal were unexpected and caused massive damage to homes, roads and bridges. So far a death toll of 60+, with thousands displaced. One of the worst hit areas was the small coastal town of Port St Johns and the severity of flooding there, as in parts of Mozambique, relates directly to large-scale deforestation in recent years. Following flood along the ocean front, beaches are littered with plastic pollution being carried out into the Indian Ocean.

    Nowhere near me -- I'm in the Western Cape, but hoping rescue support services and rebuilding happen sooner than later.

  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Thank you, MaryLouise. In my gross SA geography ignorance I had pictured Durban in the SW.
    A tour of Google Maps gas somewhat informed me. I was also intrigued to see the various mountain ranges scattered throughout...again, I thought they were localised. I need to find and watch a documentary.
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Let me scout around when I have a moment and see if I can put up a good non-touristy link, Climacus. It's always a pleasure to look up churches or walking trails mentioned here, expand my (very limited) knowledge of Australia and New Zealand.
  • Catching up on these boards after a week, as Mrs BA and myself have been deeply involved in both Easter festivities and preparations for this event. Currently resting my aching joints after spending the last two days rising at dawn to help plant over 200 Australian flags as part of a field of honour at the town cemetery and remove them before dusk as an adjunct to the exhibition. Hard work, but emotionally satisfying when we see the reaction from locals and visitors.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    I gather the roads to wankydilla were cut off yeterday ... for those who recall the place to which I refer.
  • Rain in the outback??
  • Catching up on these boards after a week, as Mrs BA and myself have been deeply involved in both Easter festivities and preparations for this event. Currently resting my aching joints after spending the last two days rising at dawn to help plant over 200 Australian flags as part of a field of honour at the town cemetery and remove them before dusk as an adjunct to the exhibition. Hard work, but emotionally satisfying when we see the reaction from locals and visitors.

    I’m glad I watched that. Thank you. I had seen something on ABC site. I noticed in video the Edgeworth David Museum. Have you read the biography of his daughter? I bought a copy but there aren’t many around. Mountain libraries copies as she kived some years at Woodford.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Lothlorien wrote: »
    Rain in the outback??

    I believe so. Not sure how much. When we were there the rain often fell hundreds of kms away in the Carnarvon Gorge area, and the rivers slowly rose in the days, weeks that followed.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Hope the floods around Wankydilla, and other areas, subsidise.

    Thanks MaryLouise.

    NZers: what do you call the device on wheels you use at a supermarket? In Rotorua and Greytown I have seen signs in the carpark referring to them as "trundlers", and upon querying my work colleagues they swore black and blue they were "trolleys" or "carts". What say you?
  • Climacus wrote: »
    NZers: what do you call the device on wheels you use at a supermarket? In Rotorua and Greytown I have seen signs in the carpark referring to them as "trundlers", and upon querying my work colleagues they swore black and blue they were "trolleys" or "carts". What say you?

    We don't call them 'carts'. I have a theory that the supermarkets that call them trundlers do so because they aren't sure whether the plural of trolley is trollies or trolleys. Personally, if I see a sign about leaving 'trollies' in the designated places I'd prefer to shop elsewhere but that is not always practical.

    What do they teach them at school these days?
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    I'm a shopping trolley person myself ... but don't forget that bumps on roads are judder bars :wink:
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    *googles 'judder bars'* -- thanks, Zappa; I hadn't been introduced to that.

    Thanks GG. I like your 'trundler' explanation. :smile:


    Well I am rather pleased with my mark for my first assignment...especially as it involved (Python) programming. But, based on a post from the academic, I continue to marvel at just what people think they can get away with... Various examples of collusion [even thought it was stated if you wanted to work together, just note it; the mark would be out of 90 rather than 100] and some laughable examples of plagiarism from a sample provided last year that used a completely different set of data (rural vs NZ socio-economic this year). People had somehow got a hold of this sample and in their assignments referred to the data as the rural dataset, and copied wholesale explanatory texts. 0 marks. I get it was tough (for me at least), and we're busy, but really -- the academic banged on about plagiarism in coding (and other areas) continually... Yet some people still think they'll slip through. :confused:
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Climacus wrote: »
    it involved (Python) programming

    Monty?

    Your insitution (like most) has good plagiarism-recognition technology. It's not gonna work when students try to beat it.

    Actually I should be on a role of honour there somewhere ... I got a few tickets and have expended much blood sweat and tears on those hallowed grounds (or e-grounds, these days). Check it out. "Zappa - extinguished student extraordinaire" ... it'll be there somewhere on an honours board :wink:

  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Shopping trolleys here.

    I'm surprised at the plagiarism Climacus. Given that they are Masters students I would have thought they would have learned how unacceptable that is in academia, and how easily it can be detected (let alone the ethical concerns).

    I did have a colleague once, in a work, rather than academic setting who joked, "Copyright - that means you have a right to copy it, right?" I was years ago, but I often think of him when copyright issues are raised.

    I remember my older brother reading a car magazine from the UK (I think) and being horrified at someone running over a "sleeping policeman" then finding they meant what we would call a "judder bar" - (no sworn officers were maimed in this story :wink: ). So what are they in Australia?

    Today we sang a Shirley Murray hymn at Church (music by Colin Gibson - if I heard correctly). The title given was ANZAC Hymn.
    As I missed other ANZAC commemorations (some were amalgamated due to security concerns and I seldom do large gatherings), I found it had a good balance of recognising different experiences.
  • Sleeping policemen were called “silent cops” here. Don’t think i have heard the term in years. They seem to have been replaced in many instances by roundabouts.
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    Yes Shirley wrote it back in 2008.
    I like the way she covered the whole spectrum of war - soldiers, the land, Conscientious Objectors, Post Traumatic effects and the world that they "defended" or wanted to build
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I'd call those annoying humps in the road sleeping policemen too. And shopping trolleys (although here in Canada they're referred to as carts).

    Regarding plagiarism, it seems to me that some people will do whatever they think they can get away with; one of the (post-grad) students in the department where I worked was sent down for plagiarism, and I have a vague feeling that D. said one of the students at the theology college where he used to teach did the same thing (also post-grad, IIRC), so it's not as if they don't know it's against the rules.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Huia wrote: »
    Shopping trolleys here.
    <snip>

    I remember my older brother reading a car magazine from the UK (I think) and being horrified at someone running over a "sleeping policeman" then finding they meant what we would call a "judder bar" - (no sworn officers were maimed in this story :wink: ).
    Yes ... in South Africa (or maybe Zambia ... or both ... Mary Louise can clarify) they're sleeping policemen.
    Huia wrote: »
    So what are they in Australia?
    "Speed humps" ... which, given Australians' use of "thongs" for what kiwis would call (inexplicably but sensibly) "jandals" and the rest of the world call (cringeworthily if onamatapoeically!) "flip-flops," begins to generate a Freudian red flag when translated back into New Zealandese.

    Though it's worth recalling that many Australianisms are state-based ... "fritz," anyone? Availaible at the "Deli." (Except I don't think it would be, as "fritz" is iirc South Australian (washed down perhaps with a schooner) and "deli" is iirc New South Welshian (aka Mexican if you come from QLD) ...




  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Zappa the word jandals was coined by the person who introduced and marketed them in New Zealand. It's a contraction of Japanese Sandals, according to information I read at Te Papa some years ago. From memory - which may not be accurate as it was some time ago - he was in J Force, the NZ soldiers who occupied Japan after the war and saw a business opportunity in adapting the design to sell in NZ.

    Galilit, I always enjoy Shirley Murray's hymns, for their theology, inclusiveness and use of language. Sadly our currant Minister uses them less than her predecessor.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Fritz in Sydney when I was growing up. Not to be bought if you cared for your health, with all sorts of ingredients you'd rather not know existed. Fritz and devon were not to be confused. Neither was edible, neither had a flavour of its own, but devon went with tomato sauce on a white bread sandwich.
  • Eldest son was three years old when he was offered a piece of devon by someone making sandwiches for Sunday School picnic lunch. He refused but said if she had salami with flavour, he would like that. Poor woman was astounded.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I had to consult with Professor Google about all that ... :mrgreen:
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Piglet wrote: »
    I had to consult with Professor Google about all that ... :mrgreen:

    :grin:

    Luncheon sausage, btw, in UhnZuhd
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    So I understand (now)!
  • We called them "thongs" here when I was a young 'un. "Flip-flops" sounds stupid to my ear and I never quite made the mental transition.
  • Thongs in Australia too. Then again, back in the day when I wore them, th4ere was only one meaning attached to the word.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    I always think of skimpy underwear when I hear the word 'thongs'.

    High winds and heavy rain causing flooding here tonight. Power is out to large parts of the city including the other half of my street. Aroha and I are going to bed with hot water bottles in case our power is affected, Very unlikely to flood here (fingers crossed).
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Stay safe, Huia.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Well , that was a damp squib, thank goodness. I didn't post anything that was factually untrue, but I think I filtered it through a lens of PTSD and panicked. The rain was unusually heavy, but lasted only a short time, unlike the storms we had last year.

    I was so relieved to wake up to a much calmer day with a dash of sunshine. :smile:
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Hurrah!

    On rain...poor Mozambique. Yet another cyclone. I hope particularly that those you know MaryLouise are okay.

    I shall hunt out your infamy around the campus, Zappa.

    On words, while I am getting an education over here it was interesting also moving to Albury. While on the NSW side of the border, they were definitely Victorian in their word usage. I stuck to my Sydney upbringing and never gave in! :smiley:
  • Huia wrote: »
    Galilit, I always enjoy Shirley Murray's hymns, for their theology, inclusiveness and use of language. Sadly our currant Minister uses them less than her predecessor.
    It gave me an extra thrill on my final visit to Iona to find myself singing one of Shirley's hymns.
    Shirley was my Matron of Honour at our wedding, John was the minister, and the young Murrays kindly unwrapped the wedding presents, separating them from their identifying cards as they did so.

    The minister at St Andrews on the Terrace writes many of her own hymns. Her church is the one to which my generation retreat if they find themselves faced with unacceptable theology in their local parish. The last time I was there I found yet another couple of old friends who had recently fled their local church after the minister had assured the congregation that the first eight chapters of Genesis were actual history. (We had formed an active and long-standing group called Frontiers of Faith in our suburban church many years ago.)
  • Several days ago I mentioned some may be interested in reading of Mary Edgeworth David, the daughter of the famousAntarctic explorer and geologist, among other things. I opened a long packed box today and right on the top was the book. Mary Edgeworth David’s Passages of Time. So letting anyone interested know. My High School was in an avenue in Hornsby named after her father. I have included a council link to him. The council has several links to famous figures. There are plenty more from illustrious scientific societies. https://hornsby.nsw.gov.au/library/catalogues-and-resources/local-history/edgeworth-david

    It has been a good afternoon. Zappa’s two commentaries were also in the box and small boxes of knitting accessories that I have been hunting for weeks.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Edgeworth-David was a great man and contributed enormously to Aust and to NSW in particular. His discoveries of large coal reserves in the Hunter brought great wealth to the colony/infant state. Then his polar exploration added to both our knowledge of Antarctica and how to prepare for exploring that frozen region. On top of that, he successfully mined under German lines in WW I to plant explosives.

  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I confess I'd never heard of him, but what a full and fascinating life - well deserving having a road named after him!
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Lothlorien wrote: »

    It has been a good afternoon. Zappa’s two commentaries were also in the box and small boxes of knitting accessories that I have been hunting for weeks.

    Awwww!
  • Edgeworth David's memory is still strongly held here on the South Maitland Coalfields. The point where he proved the existence of the Greta Coal Measures is just a few kilometres from our home. At one time the collieries in the district provided 55% of Australia's steaming coal. Thirty years following the discovery he was on the Western Front with many of the miners whose livelihood came from his work, and who formed the backbone of the tunnelling regiments for whom he was the technical advisor.

    Gee D refers to his work in Antarctica where his most significant accomplishment was the epic journey with Mawson to establish the location of the South Magnetic Pole.

    He was also on good terms with pioneering Hunter Valley winemakers, often bringing teams of students to the area around Cessnock to undertake soil testing for the vineyards.

    It is a moot point as to whether the national instrumentality now named Geoscience Australia would have come into existence if not for his longstanding and persistent lobbying.

    I believe that he was only the second private citizen after the poet Henry Lawson to be accorded a State funeral in New South Wales, and the news reports indicate that when the hearse reached the southern end of the Sydney Harbour Bridge on the way to Northern Suburbs Cemetery the last car in the cortege had not left St Andrew's Cathedral a distance of just over a mile away.

    From memory, I believe Mary Edgeworth David was born at Maitland Hospital while the family was living in a tent at Farley during her father's explorations. Lothlorien can you confirm whether it was her or her sister?
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