On Screen Now! The 2019 Movie Thread

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  • I've just been to see Downton and revelled in the scenes involving Maggie Smith She is a wonderful actress and I would happily have watched the whole film with her as the only actress.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    Oh, rhubarb, me too!
    She is a marvel with attitude!!
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    jedijudy wrote: »
    Oh, rhubarb, me too!
    She is a marvel with attitude!!
    Yes, but she needs Penelope Wilton/Isobel's rejoinders for maximum effect.

  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    Downton Abbey and, as JJ says above, it is wonderful.

    I saw it last night with a couple of friends and really enjoyed it. Great to see Tom take a strong part in the storyline, and liked the way things went for Thomas.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited September 30
    snafu, delete
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited October 5
    The Tree Of Life

    Going by the trailers for this, as well as having seen Mallick's earlier Thin Red Line, I was expecting a bombastic, self-indulgent exercise in pseudo-spirituality, wallowing in its own self-proclaimed profundity.

    Let's just say I was NOT pleasantly surprised. Though I will admit that the first 45 minutes or so, up to the end of the "creation of the universe" sequence, were a little better than what came afterwards.

    And, yes, it was expertly filmed, and maybe if my Existentialism prof at university had managed to complete the syllabus and get to Heidegger, I might have a better handle on whatever Deep Insights this had to offer, but to be brutally honest, it really just seemed like little more than "The Lord Works In Mysterious Ways".
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Ad Astra

    I think I dozed off, or was at least in a waking trance, toward the end of this. That was probably more due to my physical condition than anything else, but still, the film didn't do much to garner my rapt attention.

    The plot is something to do with an astronaut going into space to see if his lost astronaut father is shooting death rays(or something) back to earth. Somehow this connects to the issue of the rest of the universe being lifeless. I think.

    Given how insignificant a role manned-space travel has really had in the world of discovery, much less our everyday lives, it's kind of funny how Hollywood continues to use it as a fallback motif for allegedly profound meditations on this, that, or the other thing.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited October 13
    Paul

    Yeah, I'm a bit late to the party on this one: I'd put off watching it for years, cuz I thought it would be just a bunch of obvious gags about a shopworn topic(ie. space aliens), but I was pleasantly surprised at how good it was(ie. by the standards of raunchy bromances).

    Likable slacker anti-heroes, some amusing cross-cultural shenanigans(Brits vs. Americans), and a modicum of philosophical depth, mostly around issues of religion(seems very much a product of the "New Atheist" era of about a decade ago). Heavy on the bodily humour, but that's to be expected.

    Don't think I was getting all the pop culture references, except for Close Encounters, Star Wars, and E.T. And I understand why Sigourney Weaver was cast as a government agent trying to kill aliens.

  • Joker

    Recommended. I'd avoided spoilers for this and only knew that Joachim Phoenix turned in a storming performance. Superb exploration of the disintegration of a mind. Socially telling too.
  • stetson wrote: »
    Crazy Rich Asians

    Okay, I liked this, because rom-coms are one of my preferred genres, and they don't seem to make a lot of them anymore, or at least, none that come to Korea. Some negatives, though...

    - Apart from the socioeconomic angle promised by the title, it really is just a typical rom-com. The culture clash, while taking place between an American-raised person and her boyfriend's family in Singapore, has more to do with "rich" than "Asian". Though the script does manage to get in the usual thing about how Asians think westerners are too individualistic, Asians are more family-oriented etc.

    And for a film that bills itself as being about "Asians", almost all the Asian characters are of Chinese ethnicity. I get that "Asian" is often used to mean something like "East Asia" or "countries influenced by Confucianism", but even that constricted definition would also include Koreans, Japanese etc.

    All that said, if you like rom-coms, this will likely fit the bill for you.

    I felt the same way- I enjoyed it but it was a very standard rom com. And yeah, it does depict almost entirely Chinese characters and, except two Sikh guards, ignores the other communities in Singapore (a lot of it was actually shot in Malaysia). Though to be fair the communities really are quite segregated for the most part.

    And yeah, these people live on a different planet- the average Chinese Malaysian doesn’t have much more in common with them than the average American.

    A term I’ve seen a lot for “countries influenced by Confucianism” is “Sinosphere.” There’s a Sinosphere group on Facebook, where most of the participants are Vietnamese.

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Joker

    Recommended. I'd avoided spoilers for this and only knew that Joachim Phoenix turned in a storming performance. Superb exploration of the disintegration of a mind. Socially telling too.

    And fans of 1970s/early 80s cinema will appreciate the references to films of that era, specifically Socrsese classics Taxi Driver and King Of Comedy.

    As for the plot to Joker itself, I have to say, I don't buy the idea that it's some sort of woe-is-me rant for the white male "incel" demographic. The script does an ample job, I thought, of showing that the same social forces victimizing Fleck are also victimizing women and non-white members of society, eg.
    the black social-worker is losing her job due to budget-cuts(granted, Fleck is probably hurt more by that), and the woman being abused by the asshole stockbrokers on the subway.

    And point of question for anyone more familiar with superhero flicks than I am...
    I know this film isn't supposed to be part of the DC cinematic universe, but I'm quite sure that the scene where the young Bruce Wayne sees his mother robbed and murdered during the riot is also in another Batman movie, possibly one of the Nolans or maybe Batman Vs. Superman? If anyone can confirm or refute that, I'd be grateful.

  • I think your latter question's answer is Nolan's Batman Begins.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Thanks. I wanted to make sure I wasn't experiencing some sort of deja vu in the theatre.

    But that leads me to this question...
    Would I be correct in thinking that this overlap qualifies Joker as part of the DC Cinematic Universe? Or is Batman's mother getting murdered an origin-story predating all these films?

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Sir Palomides wrote:
    A term I’ve seen a lot for “countries influenced by Confucianism” is “Sinosphere.” There’s a Sinosphere group on Facebook, where most of the participants are Vietnamese.

    I'm curious. Do most of these Vietnamese participants identify with Chinese culture? Or do they just participate there because it's a place where issues of relevance to the region are discussed?

  • A Clockwork Orange

    Some films transcend time, whilst other are stuck in them. A Clockwork Orange cannot decide which one it is. Similarly, it did not choose whether it was stylised or realistic.
    Though reasonably well made,¹ I find it difficult to see why it was ever considered a masterpiece. And that is before one considers the problematic approach to rape.
    Tits! Look at the pretty lady with TITS! oh, and she is getting sexually assaulted, in preparation for a gang rape, but TITS! And Kubrick attempting to make Alex sympathetic?
    As for the rest of the film, it is obviously trying for stylized, but looks more like a minimalist play which doesn't work on the actual sets. Somehow the bright colours manage to look drab. (Thank you 1970's!) It feels like Kubrick took a stage production's sets and costumes and dragged them into the real world.
    On the stage, I can ignore a few bits of trash representing urban decay. Doesn't work so well in a film where the obvious real world is not altered to fit.
    It would not be so bad if the visuals were not a reflection of the acting and direction. Some bad acting, whether chosen or directed, spoil key bits of the film.


    ¹Though, some of the set dressing was decidedly amateur and the mix of character styles pulls one out of the film. But, hey, cool camera work!
  • stetson wrote: »
    Thanks. I wanted to make sure I wasn't experiencing some sort of deja vu in the theatre.

    But that leads me to this question...
    Would I be correct in thinking that this overlap qualifies Joker as part of the DC Cinematic Universe? Or is Batman's mother getting murdered an origin-story predating all these films?

    I think this is meant to be a standalone film and is perhaps all the better for that.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited October 13
    lilbuddha wrote: »
    A Clockwork Orange

    Some films transcend time, whilst other are stuck in them. A Clockwork Orange cannot decide which one it is. Similarly, it did not choose whether it was stylised or realistic.
    Though reasonably well made,¹ I find it difficult to see why it was ever considered a masterpiece. And that is before one considers the problematic approach to rape.
    Tits! Look at the pretty lady with TITS! oh, and she is getting sexually assaulted, in preparation for a gang rape, but TITS! And Kubrick attempting to make Alex sympathetic?
    As for the rest of the film, it is obviously trying for stylized, but looks more like a minimalist play which doesn't work on the actual sets. Somehow the bright colours manage to look drab. (Thank you 1970's!) It feels like Kubrick took a stage production's sets and costumes and dragged them into the real world.
    On the stage, I can ignore a few bits of trash representing urban decay. Doesn't work so well in a film where the obvious real world is not altered to fit.
    It would not be so bad if the visuals were not a reflection of the acting and direction. Some bad acting, whether chosen or directed, spoil key bits of the film.


    ¹Though, some of the set dressing was decidedly amateur and the mix of character styles pulls one out of the film. But, hey, cool camera work!

    LilBuddha:

    You might find that Pauine Kael's extremely negative review of Clockwork Orange parallels a lot of what you're saying in your own.

    Personally, I think Kael sums up Kubrick's style perfectly(her description of him as a "clean-minded pornographer" took on added pertinent after Eyes Wide Shut came out), the difference being that I actually like that style.

    And Kael can't seem to decide whether she's disgusted by Kubrick's wallowing in porn and violence, or disappointed that he didn't do it with more flare.

  • stetson wrote: »
    Sir Palomides wrote:
    A term I’ve seen a lot for “countries influenced by Confucianism” is “Sinosphere.” There’s a Sinosphere group on Facebook, where most of the participants are Vietnamese.

    I'm curious. Do most of these Vietnamese participants identify with Chinese culture? Or do they just participate there because it's a place where issues of relevance to the region are discussed?

    They are genuinely interested in Chinese culture, mostly pre-modern, both in itself and as it is filtered through Vietnamese culture. Dress, painting, and calligraphy are frequent topics. There are also Koreans and a few Japanese. I don’t know much about it but it seems that each of these countries have preserved some elements of Chinese culture better than China itself and that’s a frequent topic of discussion/ debate. I don’t know know if this interest represents a real trend in Vietnam,or if these people would be considered weird hobbyists.

  • stetson wrote: »
    lilbuddha wrote: »
    A Clockwork Orange

    Some films transcend time, whilst other are stuck in them. A Clockwork Orange cannot decide which one it is. Similarly, it did not choose whether it was stylised or realistic.
    Though reasonably well made,¹ I find it difficult to see why it was ever considered a masterpiece. And that is before one considers the problematic approach to rape.
    Tits! Look at the pretty lady with TITS! oh, and she is getting sexually assaulted, in preparation for a gang rape, but TITS! And Kubrick attempting to make Alex sympathetic?
    As for the rest of the film, it is obviously trying for stylized, but looks more like a minimalist play which doesn't work on the actual sets. Somehow the bright colours manage to look drab. (Thank you 1970's!) It feels like Kubrick took a stage production's sets and costumes and dragged them into the real world.
    On the stage, I can ignore a few bits of trash representing urban decay. Doesn't work so well in a film where the obvious real world is not altered to fit.
    It would not be so bad if the visuals were not a reflection of the acting and direction. Some bad acting, whether chosen or directed, spoil key bits of the film.


    ¹Though, some of the set dressing was decidedly amateur and the mix of character styles pulls one out of the film. But, hey, cool camera work!

    LilBuddha:

    You might find that Pauine Kael's extremely negative review of Clockwork Orange parallels a lot of what you're saying in your own.

    Personally, I think Kael sums up Kubrick's style perfectly(her description of him as a "clean-minded pornographer" took on added pertinent after Eyes Wide Shut came out), the difference being that I actually like that style.

    And Kael can't seem to decide whether she's disgusted by Kubrick's wallowing in porn and violence, or disappointed that he didn't do it with more flare.
    Not more flare, more brutality. Kubrick's rape scenes play down the horror of rape. There is more titillation in those scenes than violence. And that is part of the problematic representation of rape in film. Even Kubrick's violence seems tame and more of an annoyance than actually damaging.

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited October 14
    lilbuddha:

    I know what you're saying, though it's debatable whether the muting of the horrors of rape in ACO is symptomatic of the general representation of rape in film, or rather Kubrick's own background as a magazine photographer engendering a style that sucks the life out of everything he filmed.

    Kael in that review theorized that the ham-acting of the people playing Alex's victims was a deliberate attempt to make it easier for audiences to like Alex and even cheer on his crimes, though it's also the case that, throughout his career, Kubrick went for maniacal facial expressions in his actors(see Jack Nicholson in The Shining).
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    There are also Koreans and a few Japanese. I don’t know much about it but it seems that each of these countries have preserved some elements of Chinese culture better than China itself and that’s a frequent topic of discussion/ debate.

    The ROK still very much identifies as a Confucian country, it's the general fallback explanation for why the culture exhibits this, that, or the other tendency. And Chinese characters(Hanja, I believe they're called) are still taught in the schools, I THINK as a required subject, and you still see them on some publications and businesses trying to project a formal or traditional image.

    That said, Korean culture is still seen as clearly distinct from Chinese culture, as I would guess is also the case in Vietnam and Japan. Not a lot of identity-confusion(as maybe in Taiwan or Hong Kong?) on that front.

  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    lilbuddha wrote: »
    A Clockwork Orange

    Some films transcend time, whilst other are stuck in them. A Clockwork Orange cannot decide which one it is. Similarly, it did not choose whether it was stylised or realistic....
    Loved the soundtrack; loathed the movie. Violent sexist crap. Oh, it DID have an Anglican priest who was the only character in the film with a working moral compass, so that's something.


  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Rossweisse wrote: »
    lilbuddha wrote: »
    A Clockwork Orange

    Some films transcend time, whilst other are stuck in them. A Clockwork Orange cannot decide which one it is. Similarly, it did not choose whether it was stylised or realistic....
    Loved the soundtrack; loathed the movie. Violent sexist crap. Oh, it DID have an Anglican priest who was the only character in the film with a working moral compass, so that's something.


    A couple of points about that priest...

    I assume he was somewhat High, given the crucifixes and candles on display in the preaching scene, and at one point, he indicates that he is celibate. However, he seems to preach in a manner I would associate with evangelicals, maybe even Pentecostals(personal visions of hellfire and whatnot), and seems very much rooted in the Bible.

    Also, given that he is supposed to be viewed as some sort of moral authority, it's kind of odd that Kubrick rather undercuts this status, in an early scene in which Alex confesses to having bad troubling thoughts, and the priest, assuming the most salacious interpretation of that, gets a big leering grin on his face, and practically begs Alex to tell him about his sexual fantasies(this is also where the priest admits to being celibate).

    But then, we're supposed to take the priest as the voice of morality when he lectures everyone about free will later on. Of course, in real life, it's possible for someone to be both a dirty old man and an expounder of general moral insight, but is seems an odd way to portray someone in a film narrative of this sort.
  • stetson wrote: »
    Rossweisse wrote: »
    lilbuddha wrote: »
    A Clockwork Orange

    Some films transcend time, whilst other are stuck in them. A Clockwork Orange cannot decide which one it is. Similarly, it did not choose whether it was stylised or realistic....
    Loved the soundtrack; loathed the movie. Violent sexist crap. Oh, it DID have an Anglican priest who was the only character in the film with a working moral compass, so that's something.


    A couple of points about that priest...

    I assume he was somewhat High, given the crucifixes and candles on display in the preaching scene, and at one point, he indicates that he is celibate. However, he seems to preach in a manner I would associate with evangelicals, maybe even Pentecostals(personal visions of hellfire and whatnot), and seems very much rooted in the Bible.

    Also, given that he is supposed to be viewed as some sort of moral authority, it's kind of odd that Kubrick rather undercuts this status, in an early scene in which Alex confesses to having bad troubling thoughts, and the priest, assuming the most salacious interpretation of that, gets a big leering grin on his face, and practically begs Alex to tell him about his sexual fantasies(this is also where the priest admits to being celibate).

    But then, we're supposed to take the priest as the voice of morality when he lectures everyone about free will later on. Of course, in real life, it's possible for someone to be both a dirty old man and an expounder of general moral insight, but is seems an odd way to portray someone in a film narrative of this sort.
    You have the scene order wrong.
    However,
    I do not think Kubrick is painting the priest as a moral authority, but as having the pretence of being one. IMO, the salacious nature of his interaction with Alex is part of Kubrick's characterisation, not undercutting anything. This motif is underlined by the way the guidance councillor interacts with Alex, especially the scene in his flat.
    @Rossweisse
    I think you've misunderstood how Kubrick intends the priest to be received. I do not see the priests as anything positive even without the subtext of the scene following the sermon, but then I do think the Hellfire and Brimstone type of preaching that he does to be a negative in every sense, so perhaps I am reading into that part of it.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited October 14
    lilbuddha wrote:

    You have the scene order wrong.

    I don't think so. The scene in which the priest tries to get some sex talk out of Alex is at the beginning of Alex's prison stint, just before the possibility of the Ludovico treatment comes up.

    The scene where the priest gets up in front of the assembled dignitaries and talks about free-will is much later, after Alex has undergone the treatment and is being presented to the public(with the guy slapping him around and the naked woman).

    Maybe you thought the lecture I was talking about was the first scene in prison("What's it gonna be, then, eh")? That DOES come before the scene in the library, but it's not really that focused on the issue of free will vs. conditioning.

    This motif is underlined by the way the guidance councillor interacts with Alex, especially the scene in his flat.

    Yeah, there is an ongoing anti-gay theme in the film, with most of the adult male characters being portrayed as either outright homosexual(eg.the social worker, the interrogating cops) or at least emasculated(eg. Alex's hapless father, the foppish politician).

    In fact, about the only adult male who doesn't come off that way is the prison warden, who delivers what seems like a pretty straightforward lecture on the virtues of punishment over rehabilitiation. You could actually make a case that he, and not the priest, represents the true authorial voice in the film, and for what it's worth, his stated views on law-and-order line up very much with the right-wing opinions that Kubrick professed in real life.
  • stetson wrote: »
    There are also Koreans and a few Japanese. I don’t know much about it but it seems that each of these countries have preserved some elements of Chinese culture better than China itself and that’s a frequent topic of discussion/ debate.

    The ROK still very much identifies as a Confucian country, it's the general fallback explanation for why the culture exhibits this, that, or the other tendency. And Chinese characters(Hanja, I believe they're called) are still taught in the schools, I THINK as a required subject, and you still see them on some publications and businesses trying to project a formal or traditional image.

    That said, Korean culture is still seen as clearly distinct from Chinese culture, as I would guess is also the case in Vietnam and Japan. Not a lot of identity-confusion(as maybe in Taiwan or Hong Kong?) on that front.

    The “Sinosphere” idea isn’t to say that Vietnam, Korea, and Japan are just different flavors of Chinese, just that they inherited some important Chinese traditions into their own cultures, in some cases preserving it better than China. For instance traditional Japanese court dress has Tang Dynasty elements that were largely forgotten in China.

    The idea of Sinosphere I guess is comparable to one historian’s idea of a “Byzantine Commonwealth” where a number of different cultures (eg Bulgars, Serbs, Georgians) absorbed important Byzantine influence while retaining their own identities.

  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    lilbuddha wrote: »
    ... @Rossweisse
    I think you've misunderstood how Kubrick intends the priest to be received. I do not see the priests as anything positive even without the subtext of the scene following the sermon, but then I do think the Hellfire and Brimstone type of preaching that he does to be a negative in every sense, so perhaps I am reading into that part of it.
    This is entirely possible. I saw the movie only once, in a cinema when it was new, and I don't remember details except for (a) thinking the priest, with his emphasis on free will, was a positive force, unusually for clerics depicted in that era; and (b) how much I disliked it overall.

  • lilbuddhalilbuddha Shipmate
    edited October 15
    stetson wrote: »
    lilbuddha wrote:

    You have the scene order wrong.

    I don't think so. The scene in which the priest tries to get some sex talk out of Alex is at the beginning of Alex's prison stint, just before the possibility of the Ludovico treatment comes up.

    The scene where the priest gets up in front of the assembled dignitaries and talks about free-will is much later, after Alex has undergone the treatment and is being presented to the public(with the guy slapping him around and the naked woman).

    Maybe you thought the lecture I was talking about was the first scene in prison("What's it gonna be, then, eh")? That DOES come before the scene in the library, but it's not really that focused on the issue of free will vs. conditioning.
    My bad, I though your were referencing the preaching scene. Personally, I do not think the preiest is represented in any way positive and I am not convinced Kubrick is making him the moral voice at any point.
    stetson wrote: »
    This motif is underlined by the way the guidance councillor interacts with Alex, especially the scene in his flat.

    Yeah, there is an ongoing anti-gay theme in the film, with most of the adult male characters being portrayed as either outright homosexual(eg.the social worker, the interrogating cops) or at least emasculated(eg. Alex's hapless father, the foppish politician).
    Yeah, not a fan of that,
    stetson wrote: »
    In fact, about the only adult male who doesn't come off that way is the prison warden, who delivers what seems like a pretty straightforward lecture on the virtues of punishment over rehabilitiation. You could actually make a case that he, and not the priest, represents the true authorial voice in the film, and for what it's worth, his stated views on law-and-order line up very much with the right-wing opinions that Kubrick professed in real life.
    I think that is a fair assessment.

  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    Just saw the new Adams Family animated movie. It was better than I expected, rather nice actually. Quite enjoyable.
  • Just seen Dark Phoenix, which was much better than I expected. I liked the plot, and there was a strong supporting cast. Sadly the central three characters (Jean, Charles and Scott) were all extremely flat, which pulled it down. I'm told they all famous actors, which makes me wonder - what does it take to be famous these days, and why aren't I a celebrity?
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Wild Rose

    Scottish film about a young Glasgow woman trying to earn money to move to Nashville and start a musical career.

    Apart from the man-bites-dog aspect of a country-themed movie set in the UK(replete with scenes of Glasgow life scored to Nashville sounds), this one pretty much follows the standard playbook for struggling-young-musician flicks. We're pretty much rooting for the young woman all the way, even when she makes personal decisions that don't seem to add up to good judgement.

    There are a number of ways that a story like this usually ends up, pretty much all of them cliche, and this film doesn't exactly break new ground. Still, if you're in the mood for a bit of feel-good, or you just like hearing hurtin' music and/or thick Scottish accents, this is recommended.

    (Cameo by Bob Harris, who I gather is a big deal on the BBC.)
  • EigonEigon Shipmate
    Now I've seen Michael Sheen looking angelic as Aziraphale in Good Omens, I discovered that he had also been in a werewolf/vampire film called Underworld, playing Lucien the head werewolf - quite a different role, all long black hair and staring eyes (like Gowron the Klingon!)!
    I've just seen the film, with Kate Beckinsale playing a Black Widow-like vampire looking out for a confused looking human in Prague who was allegedly carrying a virus, or something. It was a bit too violent for me, but Michael Sheen and Kate Beckinsale were actually a lot of fun, with Bill Nighy as vampire elder Viktor.
    Apparently there's a whole series of these films, including a prequel called Rise of the Lycans where Michael Sheen takes his shirt off a lot.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited October 27
    Birdman

    From a few years back. I'd put off watching this for a while, because, based on just reading a few snippets of reviews, I figured it would be a pretty cliche art-house film with predictable motifs.

    And I was right. Has-been Hollywood actor trying to redeem himself on the New York stage, dealing with dysfunctional family members and asshole collaborators, with his erstwhile superhero alter-ego(and of course this is Michael Keaton in the role, adding an extra layer of po-mo irony) whispering taunts and inspiration into his mind's ear.

    Total cocktail napkin stuff. But still, once you get past that, and the slightly unjustified pretensions it brings to itself, this is a rather enjoyable ride, helped along especially by a pretty good script with rapid-dire dialogue, mostly of an acerbic nature.

    And it's not so ensconced in the rarefied world of the theatrical life to avoid some amusing digs at contemporary concerns like social media etc. Low hanging fruit, for the most part, but still comfortingly current.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited October 27
    Rambo: Last Blood

    (I don't think this film warrants the courtesy of spoiler shields. Read at you own risk.)

    This was bad, even by the standards of the series. Given the title, I thought it might be some sort of return to First Blood's relatively thoughtful and nuanced portryal of a Vietnam vet struggling against the wider American society, but it's like a non-thinking man's version of Taken.

    Rambo exacts revenge on the human-traficking Mexican pimps who abducted and killed his niece, by luring them back to his farm in Arizona and killing them all in a booby-trapped underground tunnel. The main girl has already died by the time the revenge scenes kick into high-gear, so there isn't even a hopeful ending to root for, and we don't get the pleasure of seeing the other women from the sex-dungeon escape. Thus, the final carnage is little more than just ten minutes or so of torture porn.

    Unlike recent incarnations of Stallone's OTHER character, which do in fact seem to be concerned with personal growth and new situations, the Rambo series is now officially sub-cocktail napkin. Though I suppose if you can get yourself worked up into hatred against cartoon caricatures of murderous Mexican pimps, you might enjoy seeing them all get tortured and disembowelled at the end.
  • SirPalomidesSirPalomides Shipmate
    edited October 27
    On the subject of grotesque revenge/torture oriented thrillers, I’ve seen some amazing films from Korea in this vein, particular the films of Na Hong-Jin- The Chaser, the Yellow Sea, and the Wailing. These films are actually good, not senseless exploitation, but very very nasty nonetheless.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Yeah, I know I've seen The Chaser, because I remember the scene where
    they go to the church and the clergyman points out the killer's artistic handiwork. It was good, but like with a lot of Korean crime films, I found the plot a little convoluted.

    Have you seen the Vengeance trilogy, by Park Chan Wook, who went to Hollywood and did Stoker, and recently a TV version of Le Carre's Little Drummer Girl? I wasn't a huge fan of the trilogy(Oldboy in particular I found incomprehensible, I prefer a straighforward Maguffin where you don't need to follow plot details), but I suspect you'd like it, if you like brutal revenge films.
  • I did see Old Boy, which I liked though I thought it was a bit cartoony. If you haven’t seen Netflix’s Daredevil series, a bunch of the action sequences are inspired by Old Boy.
  • all the adverts for the Rambo film made it look like a grown up, bloodier version of Home Alone
  • Wet Kipper wrote: »
    all the adverts for the Rambo film made it look like a grown up, bloodier version of Home Alone
    Which has been a common, comic observation.
  • actually I've just seen that you and I both mentioned this same point back in September in the previous page of this thread :blush:
  • Wet Kipper wrote: »
    actually I've just seen that you and I both mentioned this same point back in September in the previous page of this thread :blush:
    O.M.G. How very meta.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    Daughter-Unit and I saw Maleficent: Mistress of Evil yesterday. We are both big Maleficent fans, so we went planning to be happy with the movie, and we were!

    I just want to say, I would love to have those wings!!! And the horns, too.

    It's a family story, so the drama is there, like it is in any family. Beastie does an OOPS, and her fairy godmother just goes with the flow. But...evil is there, disguised as
    a queen,
    but that's telegraphed a mile before we get to the castle!!

    I did see something I never thought I'd see in a movie. I take it back. There have been
    evil organists...what a terrible thought!
    in other dark comic films. But the very nerve of them using Bach's (my man) music to accentuate the evilness. How very dare they.

    Anyhow, it was cute, and clever, with excellent special effects!!

    Has anyone else seen it?
  • Re: Stetson on Ad Astra

    I rather enjoyed it, the more I reflected upon it. I found it gratifying that the crux of it was a father-son relationship rather than it being a space opera. It reminded me to some degree of Solaris (Lem/Tarkovsky - I haven't seen the Soderberg version) and of Sunshine (Boyle). I've said it before, and I'll say it again: if Brad Pitt weren't so pretty, he'd be taken more seriously as an actor.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    A friend and I went to see "Judy," on the last months (with flashbacks to her youth) of Judy Garland. It's a bit depressing - well, Garland's life was a bit depressing - but it's very well done, and the performances, starting with Renee Zollweger in the title role, are outstanding.
  • Official Secrets
    I don't think this got the attention it deserved - got a bit lost in the Downton hype. I'll admit I put off going to see it, only went in the end because I was badgered into it by the family thesp. Anyway, its a really good film and, much to my surprise, Keira Knightley was brilliant: I've usually found her performances rather two dimensional (at best) but she's terrific in this. Even better, they've teamed her up with Matthew Goode (surely one of the most under-rated actors of his age group) who she was with in The Imitation Game and a roll call of some of the best British male acting talent around (only Rhys Ifans is miscast, and he's just terrible). Track it down because its worth it.
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