Yes, Virginia, politics is a dirty business

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Comments

  • Dave WDave W Shipmate
    According to the article, the caption on the back of the original photo is “Coal Strike Crisis, South Wales Colliers (coal miners) merrily discussing the situation over post of beer. 27.2. 1912.”

    I’m pretty sure the customer in question would have been equally offended by seeing the same picture in a shop selling the Welsh equivalent of Cornish pasties (if there is such a thing.)
  • Dave W wrote: »
    I’m pretty sure the customer in question would have been equally offended by seeing the same picture in a shop selling the Welsh equivalent of Cornish pasties (if there is such a thing.)
    Oddly enough, the first pasty I ever ate was in Cardiff.


  • Simon Toad wrote: »
    Penny S wrote: »
    No coal in Cornwall, and I suspect the undoubted skills of Cornish miners are somewhat different from those of coal miners, for geological reasons, so it isn't appropriate in a pasty shop, anyway.

    they tin miners or sommit? Or English coal miners from elsewhere?

    Looks like coal miners from somewhere else - tin miners get filthy underground too, but not covered in coal dust (link to Daily Mail article with photos from 1890). The other give away is the mirror in the background - Bass & Co Burton Ale - originally made in Burton-on-Trent, several hundred miles to the north. There were and are different breweries in Cornwall.

    It's really inaccurate marketing and nothing to do with Cornish pasties.

    Phwoar... now I know why Poldark is so hot :tongue:
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    It's really inaccurate marketing and nothing to do with Cornish pasties.

    I wonder how many of the customers know or care about the inaccuracy? They are there to buy pasties and that's what they care about.
  • Curiosity killedCuriosity killed Shipmate, 8th Day Host
    So the shop uses a picture that has nothing to do with their wares, that looks, in the context, like an offensive practice in that area and the person who objects is over-sensitive? When the shop could find less ambiguous pictures of actual tin-mining, the reason the pasties were originally eaten, to hang on their walls?

    The knobbly ends of pastry were specific to tin-mining, which is found with arsenic, to give the miner something to hold on to that they didn't eat, so they didn't poison themselves each meal time.

    Cornish pasties are one of the foods with an area mark, like champagne. (Just we've got chains of station booths selling them.)
  • Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    Why do we have Italian restaurants? German restaurants? Middle Eastern, Indian, Chinese, Mexican, French, Thai, etc. etc. restaurants? Arizonans come from all over, and we like to experience different types of food and cultures. I haven't been to the Cornish Pasty restaurant (there are several), but friends rave about it. (They have English ale!)

    This. Restaurants are one of the most important and common ways to get more comfortable around and with people and food from other ethnicities and cultures. If you find out something good about a person, ethnicity, and/or culture, if they do something you value and appreciate, if they help you in some way, you're apt to have a better opinion of them.

    Other sorts of businesses and encounters help, too. But food is pretty neutral. Everyone needs to eat, and eating the same thing all the time can get boring. Plus most Americans don't get the chance to travel out of the country, and may not live in a diverse community, So if they can afford to occasionally eat out, or make foreign food from scratch, or even try a frozen TV dinner of a foreign flavor, it stretches their appreciation of differences.
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    Meanwhile, if we could please get back to the OP, the mad rush to judgment seems to have subsided.
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    In the linked article it identifies the men as Welsh coal miners, with the photo associated with a strike, which makes the coal dust interesting. And may explain why some of the dust does look a little applied rather than acquired in the process of actually mining. Apparently it was done for safety - keeping the owners ignorant of identity.
  • Simon ToadSimon Toad Shipmate
    edited February 19
    Meanwhile, if we could please get back to the OP, the mad rush to judgment seems to have subsided.

    Is the whole thing a bit of a reality check? Purity versus pragmatism, with pragmatism winning out? It is such a pity that the Governor was an arse about exactly what happened. Things would have been easier if he had followed Cliffdweller's sensible series of steps above. In fact Clifdweller's post and Stonespring's gloss represents the position for me concerning historical bad behavior.

    The whole thing reminds me a little of the way we liberal Christians hold things in tension, and live within that space between myth, faith and mystery. We learn to sit with imperfection.
  • Doc TorDoc Tor Hell Host
    It has been drawn to my attention that this thread is just too interesting for Hell.

    So away to another board with your discussions on pastry-encased foodstuffs, and get back to gutting the body politic.

    DT
    HH
  • There's a new investigation out by USA Today into a bunch of college yearbooks. They found blackface and Klan outfits pictured at schools all over the country - of course it was worse in the South, but there was plenty at elite schools like Cornell too.

    In the course of the project USA Today found that one of their own editors had designed a yearbook page with blackface photos at her alma mater, Arizona State, in 1989.

    It is really striking how ubiquitous this stuff is. And of course the frat and sorority types who engaged in it are our leaders now, in government, in business, in the media.

    I'm reminded of how a bunch of people on Twitter pointed out that male reporters who later turned out to be sexual harassers directed a lot of the coverage of the first mainstream female Presidential candidate during the 2016 election. A huge number of our national and local leaders have participated in this kind of ignorant (at best) college behavior and now are making policies and reporting stories that shape all of our lives.
  • In the workplace, I often say that if one person makes a certain mistake, that's the worker's fault, but if 10 workers make a certain mistake, that's management's fault.

    This smells like a systemic problem.

    The issue for the Democrats is purity v pragmatism. I point again to Cliffdweller and Stonespring's series of tests.
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