The Beatles! Good, bad, music, lyrics, the lads themselves, conspiracies/hoaxes, etc.

Golden KeyGolden Key Shipmate
edited February 19 in Heaven
We wound up having a side discussion 'bout the Lads From Liverpool on the "Oops - your Trump presidency discussion thread" in Purg. I'd like to continue it, and some of us have Definite Views & Opinions. So I'm importing the posts to this thread, and then we can have at it!
:) (yipee)

[Edited title - Tubbs]

Comments

  • Golden KeyGolden Key Shipmate
    edited February 19
    From the "Oops - your Trump presidency discussion thread" in Purg:
    Golden Key wrote: »
    mt--
    mousethief wrote: »
    Number nine. Number nine. Number nine.

    Ok, I presume this is a quote. From what, please? I'm tempted to say the "Prisoner" TV series, because people were known by numbers. But I don't think that's right.

    Thx,

    Simon Toad wrote: »
    Golden Key wrote: »
    mt--

    mousethief wrote: »
    Number nine. Number nine. Number nine.

    Ok, I presume this is a quote. From what, please? I'm tempted to say the "Prisoner" TV series, because people were known by numbers. But I don't think that's right.

    Thx,

    I read it as being from the Beatles song Revolution 9 a song that attracted quite a number of conspiracy theories in its day.

    Eutychus wrote: »
    Golden Key wrote: »
    mt--
    mousethief wrote: »
    Number nine. Number nine. Number nine.

    Ok, I presume this is a quote. From what, please? I'm tempted to say the "Prisoner" TV series, because people were known by numbers. But I don't think that's right.

    Thx,
    See this page and especially the audio files on it.

    Golden Key wrote: »
    {Slight tangent re Beatles.|

    Thanks for the Beatles and "Number 9" info. I know about the "Paul is a dead man" and "The Walrus is Paul" clues. But I'd forgotten most of the rest of the conspiracy/hoax. Probably partly because I was a Good Little Fundamentalist Christian when George (?) made his "We're more popular than Jesus now" unfortunate comment. I went from being a fan to at least avoiding fandom. I gradually went back, as I grew up, though my appreciation is more of the lads and the music and sometimes the lyrics, than the lore.

    Golden Key wrote: »
    {Slight tangent re Beatles.|... I was a Good Little Fundamentalist Christian when George (?) made his "We're more popular than Jesus now" unfortunate comment...
    Not unfortunate - deliberate.

    And quiet George wouldn't have said it - which one of them had the biggest mouth? It's him. Blaming George. Really.

    Golden Key wrote: »
    {Slight tangent re Beatles.}

    Well, a) ISTM it *was* unfortunate, however deliberate, because it put a lot of people off the Beatles; and b) I did put a question mark after his name. I'm not sure who it was, but I think I heard it attributed to George at some point.

    I just looked it up, and it was John. I'm not sure who was my Beatles crush, back in the day; but I think maybe Ringo, followed by Paul. So I wasn't particularly invested in George or John, except that they were in the group. (No offense to them. I think all the disapproving media about Yoko put me off her and John, way back when. But I grew to appreciate her a little more, and Paul says she wasn't responsible for the lads breaking up.)

    Simon Toad wrote: »
    Poor Yoko. The old evil woman trope.

    {End of import from Purg thread.}



  • Love 'em. Yoko takes too much stick. "Beatles for Sale" was and remains execrable.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Love 'em. Yoko takes too much stick. "Beatles for Sale" was and remains execrable.

    I do like Eight Days a Week, though.
  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    "Beatles for Sale" a rushed recording, and the last before their music started evolving. Six months later would come Yesterday and a year after that And Your Bird Can Sing, Here there and Everywhere and Tomorrow Never Knows. The progression in the Beatles' music was rapid.

    Beatles for Sale was the end of an era, the end of them filling albums with songs from their early days before they wrote songs themselves. The old Beatles died on Beatles for Sale. The new progressive Beatles would be reborn on HELP!*

    But the progression should not have been a surprise, the Beatles for Sale recording sessions also came up with the single I Feel Fine, so they were not a dead loss. The Beatles were touring extensively, producing two albums a year plus non-album singles. Who has an output like that now.
    *All info relates to the British releases and not the US releases which were fucked up by Capitol and United Artists.
  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    Love 'em. Yoko takes too much stick. "Beatles for Sale" was and remains execrable.

    I do like Eight Days a Week, though.

    And No Reply. But two good songs do not an album make.
    But they had nothing else, Paul McCartney admitted that his "I'll follow the sun" would not have been good enough for an earlier album. I'm not just blaming McCartney, Lennon's "I don't want to spoil the party" is as bad.

    At least Ringo was on form.
  • I sang my children to sleep with the B-side of Abbey Road. Grew up on them. Spent lots of time discussing their break-up. Listened to some tracks backwards. I have several records with all the poster and insert bits intact. If you want to do trivia, I'm in.

    Have most of John's and Paul's solo and reconstituted bands' records (on vinyl) as well . Not so keen on Ringo post break-up. George was either genius or awful by himself. Paul turned into a bit of dipstick later and some of his lyrics are terrible.

    I recommend "Across the Universe" which is a movie, and a play, based on Beatles songs. Some of it is terrific. Particularly "He's so Heavy, I Want You". , which turned the songs into a magnificent protest, at about 2:10 the scene when I first saw it- it really meant something as I watched the latest USA invasion of somewhere.
  • If you haven't been to the Beatles Museum in Liverpool, then go. Respect.
  • I have so many favorite Beatles songs, even though they split before I was conscious of them. Today, my favorite is She Came in Through the Bathroom Window. Their music doesn't really connect with life events in the way that live acts in the '90's does, but that's because I was very young when I was listening to them - not even a teenager. But they have hung around in my head, so they did get in.
  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    Golden Key wrote: »

    As if America invented Beatlemania. Huh!
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    Chorister wrote: »
    If you haven't been to the Beatles Museum in Liverpool, then go. Respect.

    Agreed -- it was a high point of our trip to England last year. We took a day trip all the way from London to Liverpool mostly to see a statue, but we added the Beatles Museum and it made the day complete!
  • Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host
    *Dons kevlar*

    I am not a fan of the Beatles. I think they were important at the time - changing the musical scenery as it was then. But now? I think so many others have taken music so much further.

    And looking at what they have individually done since, there is nothing. Lennon did some OK stuff, but it doesn't age. And if you mention Imagine, I will slap you - that is nauseating. McCartney - sadly, I don't think the Frog Chorus is the worst, and that is dispicable.

    So not dismissing what they did. But I think there have been other bands who have been as important. OK, they were the first, but not the best.

    *Runs away*
  • Further?

    We are so obsessed with progress.

    There's an argument to say that music reached its pinnacle with Palestrina.

    This is probably a subject for Purg, but its a fruitless discussion.
  • People have done stuff after the Beatles that built on what they did and took it further? Whoa, I'm going to have a heart attack. I just can't even imagine that being possible. Hold still while I find my flamethrower.

    I get it that a lot of people are a little too Beatles crazy and claim things for them that are just improbable if not impossible, or at the very least way too superlative. But one hardly needs a flame-proof suit to say "the worst of the exaggeraters are exaggerating."

    Bah-ruther.
  • The Beatles was about more than music. Which is basically all music.
  • idjidj Shipmate
    I was a fan of the Beatles at the time, and still rather enjoy a lot of the music (some strictly due to nostalgia and a longing for a simpler time, of course) but what is of greater interest to me is the state of the world at the time. What were we looking for that made so many of us fall into 'Beatlemania'? What made this group unique in the history of modern music and start what amounts to a musical revolution? Now I'm more of a historian than anything, though I'm still a musician.
  • I liked The Beatles from Rubber Soul on. Before that it was The Stones. I like concept albums and The Beatles gave us a few.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    edited March 6
    I was on the bus the other day. Some drivers have the music system on, some prefer to drive in ( relative ) silence. Some Beatles music came on and I thought "I remember hearing this for the first time when it was new."

    I felt very old.
  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    I liked The Beatles from Rubber Soul on. Before that it was The Stones. I like concept albums and The Beatles gave us a few.

    The Stones hit their peak from '69 through to the early '70s after the Beatles had finished recording.

    The Stones were more derivative in their music, never being far from blues rock, the Beatles were far more inventive, except for the White Album.
  • RicardusRicardus Shipmate
    Trudy wrote: »
    Chorister wrote: »
    If you haven't been to the Beatles Museum in Liverpool, then go. Respect.

    Agreed -- it was a high point of our trip to England last year. We took a day trip all the way from London to Liverpool mostly to see a statue, but we added the Beatles Museum and it made the day complete!

    Being from Liverpool, I am now wondering which statue ...
  • aethelstanaethelstan Shipmate
    balaam wrote: »
    I liked The Beatles from Rubber Soul on. Before that it was The Stones. I like concept albums and The Beatles gave us a few.

    The Stones hit their peak from '69 through to the early '70s after the Beatles had finished recording.

    The Stones were more derivative in their music, never being far from blues rock, the Beatles were far more inventive, except for the White Album.

    I heard the White Album again a few weeks ago. Not their best work IMO and seemed to be largely copied from Neil Innes and the Rutles.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    aethelstan wrote: »
    I heard the White Album again a few weeks ago. Not their best work IMO and seemed to be largely copied from Neil Innes and the Rutles.

    This is either chronologically inept or one of the funniest things I've read on the ship in weeks.
  • aethelstanaethelstan Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    aethelstan wrote: »
    I heard the White Album again a few weeks ago. Not their best work IMO and seemed to be largely copied from Neil Innes and the Rutles.

    This is either chronologically inept or one of the funniest things I've read on the ship in weeks.

    Time is an illusion, but listen to the White Album and much of it really does sound as though Neil Innes launched it back through a wormhole. Not his best work, of course - that was the theme song for The Raggy Dolls, a more profound view on the human condition than Lennon ever managed.

  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    Except anything Innes wrote in pastiche of the Beatles is better than fully half of the White Album.
  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    The White Album was rushed.

    The release of the rehearsal tapes show that band members who were not on the final cut did rehearse those songs. In the end Lennon was recording in one studio with McCartney in another in order to get it finished.

    Trying to get a good take without overdubs, and different takes for the mono and stereo pressings did not help either.

    The White Album concept was to show their influences, instead of several influences going into one song each was in the style of the influences. For that reason it is great because it gives an insight into their music.

    If I were limited to one Beatles album, not counting red or blue, I'd be torn between Revolver and Abbey Road.
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