So, how was YOUR day?

jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
I have tears coming out of my eyes, and my nose is running, and you all must hear this story, too.

Daughter-Unit was on her way to the hardware store and stopped at a red light. All of a sudden, pieces of dirt start to fall out of the sky onto the cars ahead of her. She looked up, and there was a big hawk carrying a 2'X2' piece of sod. D-U could see the people in their cars jump and look around as dirt was hitting them. As if that wasn't bad enough, the hawk must have gotten tired of carrying the sod, because she (I'm assuming it was a female going to carpet her nest) dropped the whole thing on one of the cars.

I'd love to get the thoughts of that particular driver!

I needed a good laugh. I'm so glad D-U shared this special event with me!

So, how was your day?
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Comments

  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    :lol: :lol:

  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    Brilliant!
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate
    Not nearly as good as that!
  • I went to our new bookless public library today to use the photo scanning equipment. I scanned some slides I took in the summer of 1967. It was like a trip in a time machine - it felt wonderful! Only another thousand or so to go.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    Wow, Stercus Tauri! I'm fascinated by a bookless library, and the fact that you have slides from '67!
    A trip down memory lane sounds delightful!
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    How was my day? I was having a nice quiet breakfast, reading our local newspaper on my tablet. My yard crew showed up much earlier than usual, and making much more noise than usual, and in the middle of that my handyman showed up an hour earlier than expected to do some repairs inside my house. My dog did not like the excessive noise outside, or the hammering inside, and took a flying leap into my lap -- knocking over my iced coffee, splashing it on her and on me, as well as the table, the floor, and my tablet. And of course the commotion from all of that got her even more upset. Eventually I got my dog calmed down, the coffee mopped up, the yard guys left, and my handyman seemed amused by the whole situation. The rest of the day was quite peaceful.
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    My day yesterday started with another failed attempt to make successful porridge in the microwave. I followed instructions but end result was boiled over porridge all over the inside of the microwave.
    In the afternoon a salesman came to give me a quote for a walk-in bath in case I have to have one later on.
    In between those two, there were 7 of us at tap and a good time was had by all!
  • The only way I can make porridge in the microwave is start with a huge bowl and only fill it a quarter or third full. I also find it works better if I cook for a minute, stir, cook again for a minute, if it's done then cook more in 30s intervals, or leave to thicken on its own.

    Yesterday was all about trying to stay positive looking at good walking through the window but not able to go out because my daughter's breathing wasn't stable enough.
  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    When I make porridge in the microwave, I cook it at 50% power for a longer period of time. It took me a few tries to work out the timing.
  • I cook porridge the same way as Curiosity killed.

    Yesterday was a quiet day of yoga class and reading for work. Alas, today is a day of marking essays (on values and principles when working with children or young people).
  • Fawkes CatFawkes Cat Shipmate
    I cook porridge the same way as Curiosity killed.

    I've recently started making porridge for lunch at work. I thought it would be a good idea to make sure that I was doing it right, so started googling 'make porridge in microwave'

    I got as far as 'make porridge in', and Google offered 'make porridge interesting'...
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    After Ash Wednesday service, I was driving home. It was dark. I was about a half block from home and ran over a piece of paper. "Hmmm", said my brain, "that looked suspiciously like a $5 bill." So I backed up and got out of my car. It was indeed a five, along with a ten and four ones!
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    The only way I can make porridge in the microwave is start with a huge bowl and only fill it a quarter or third full. I also find it works better if I cook for a minute, stir, cook again for a minute, if it's done then cook more in 30s intervals, or leave to thicken on its own.

    Yesterday was all about trying to stay positive looking at good walking through the window but not able to go out because my daughter's breathing wasn't stable enough.
    Re porridge: I'll try that. Do you cover the dish with clingfilm and make a few holes in it? I was using my Tupperwave dish (with proper lid, but to use a larger bowl, I'll have to use a casserole dish.

    I do hope your daughter's breathing improves enough for a walk this weekend.


  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    My husband makes porridge in the microwave - also in a really big bowl, but he doesn’t cover it.

    :smile:
  • Tree BeeTree Bee Shipmate
    I make porridge every morning in the microwave. I have 2 large plastic jugs and I find that porridge cooks much quicker in the lighter one.
    For two portions I find it cooks well at 1000 for 2 and a half minutes, stir then another minute. If still a little sloppy I pop it back for another 30 seconds. As I measure the oats and milk by eye, the time taken does vary. I never cover it.
  • I do cover my porridge, but loosely - I use a plate that fits on top of the bowl (no clingfilm in this household)
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    My thanks for further hints on porridge - I'll have another try and see what happens!
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    Ah! Ash Wednesday! My roommate and I were going to get up for 8AM ashes but took a look at the pouring rain and decided to stay in a while, then get manicures at a strip mall shop if the rain calmed down (it did) and then go to the noon service. Manicures all done, we headed back to her car to drive to church. Suddenly beside me there was a shriek! My friend was face down flat on the ground with her pant cuff caught on a metal plate bolted to the asphalt. Her nose and eyebrow were bleeding; her head, back, and neck hurt; her knees hurt like hell. She was afraid to get up in case of spine damage, so I called an ambulance. Then I called another friend get me and to fetch home her car. Then we had to take an Uber to get his car (I can't drive because of an eye situation right now) and then he dropped me off at the hospital before he went to work. After several hours getting x-ray and CT scans, the upshot was that she didn't break anything -thank God!- and her nephew came and took us home. It has been pretty miserable for her these last two days. I've been feeding her comfort food and getting her to take her pain killers on time. Poor thing!
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Some months ago I broke a tooth on a piece of toast (really). Yesterday, same tooth, different toast.

    Fortunately I could to see dentist immediately. Got tooth comprehensively re-engineered. Came home to find screwdriver bit had arrived in the post, so spent the rest of the morning finishing the pine table I’d been assembling.

    So a day of drilling.
  • After work yesterday I met my daughter for a quick dinner, then we went to a talk on "Polar Women" at Dundee's Discovery Centre, for International Women's Day.

    The speakers were Wendy Searle, who is planning to ski solo to the South Pole this winter, and Anne Strathie who visited the Antarctic as research for two books.

    The audience seemed to be full of women who had had adventures of their own. Both speakers and audience were fizzing with enthusiasm for life. I'm not an adventurous sort - I prefer a good book, a mug of coffee and a large supply of chocolate - but my daughter is.

    It was great.
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Shipmate
    Went out to admire a bright pink kalanchoe flowering on the small porch (stoep). Looked up and discovered yet another magnificent paper wasps' nest attached to the corrugated iron roof with at least a dozen black wasps simmering with rage and circling their grey edifice protectively. Thought of the poet Elizabeth Bishop's Santarem:

    In the blue pharmacy the pharmacist
    had hung an empty wasps’ net from a shelf:
    small, exquisite, clean matte white,
    and hard as stucco. I admired it
    so much he gave it to me.


    Day put on hold while I call wasp destroyers. Why do they keep coming back? Why can't we get along?
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    A reasonably successful bowl of porridge this morning! The next thing I need to do is to find a container wich will hold just the right amount of oats.
  • Lily PadLily Pad Shipmate
    Re. microwaving porridge. The heavier the bowl, the better it works. Never ever use a plastic container - toxic stuff. Here I make it by microwaving for one minute - stir - then thirty seconds - stir - let sit for at least a minute - stir - eat.

    My day, so far, has consisted of waking up later than usual despite the fact that the clocks had to be moved forward by an hour. I think the "nasty dog encounter" at the beach yesterday must be taking its toll. My dog is fine but my friend's dog was hurt and the woman who could not control her dog is going to be paid a visit by the authorities. Sigh. Looking forward to a quiet day.
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    Lily Pad

    Interesting about the heavier the bowl - I used a fairly large pyrex casserole dish, so will continue to use that!
  • I bought myself a big*, deep ceramic soup bowl, specially for porridge. It's almost hemispherical, about 6"/15cm in diameter. I find a fistful of oats just covered with milk works fine in this and only fills it to a quarter to a third full.

    * by my reckoning - too big for soup or normal servings unless less than half full.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    I went to our new bookless public library today to use the photo scanning equipment. I scanned some slides I took in the summer of 1967. It was like a trip in a time machine - it felt wonderful! Only another thousand or so to go.

    I'm sorry to go back a few days but I really have to know how public library (especially a new one) can be bookless? This requires explanation.

    Also I wonder if someday I need to take on scanning my parents' THOUSANDS of slides! I can still remember the ritual of setting up the screen and putting the projector on the ironing board for a slide show ... a big part of my childhood! We definitely have slides going back to the early 60s.
  • Trudy wrote: »
    I went to our new bookless public library today to use the photo scanning equipment. I scanned some slides I took in the summer of 1967. It was like a trip in a time machine - it felt wonderful! Only another thousand or so to go.

    I'm sorry to go back a few days but I really have to know how public library (especially a new one) can be bookless? This requires explanation.

    Also I wonder if someday I need to take on scanning my parents' THOUSANDS of slides! I can still remember the ritual of setting up the screen and putting the projector on the ironing board for a slide show ... a big part of my childhood! We definitely have slides going back to the early 60s.

    Here you go: https://ideaexchange.org/oldpostoffice. The one with books is a five minute walk away.
    I am not sure that I'll live long enough to scan all my slides, but at least I've started. The scanner will also scan negative strips to produce positive images, which will be very useful, as I have many of those, too. It's a slow process, though there are companies that will do it for you.
  • Stercus TauriStercus Tauri Shipmate
    edited March 11
    deleted duplicate post
  • Coffee and cereal around eleven. Called in at the public library in Glastonbury (home) to use the wifi. Then off to the Library of Avalon (Europe's only esoteric library) for an afternoon volunteering among tomes on astrology, divination, magic, Jung, homeopathy, classic science fiction (no idea why that's there) and Mein Kampf (I really have no idea why that's there) and now in the George & Pilgrim for a pint. Later there will be curry and rice or potatoes and chorizo, catching up on the weekend's football on the BBCiPlayer, some writing, and last night's Top Gear.
  • Firenze wrote: »
    Some months ago I broke a tooth on a piece of toast (really). Yesterday, same tooth, different toast.

    I sympathise. I managed to break a tooth on a piece of bread. Got it fixed, then broke the same tooth on chocolate. Now that tooth is bright and shiny and will outlive me.
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    edited March 12
    I bought myself a big*, deep ceramic soup bowl, specially for porridge. It's almost hemispherical, about 6"/15cm in diameter. I find a fistful of oats just covered with milk works fine in this and only fills it to a quarter to a third full.

    * by my reckoning - too big for soup or normal servings unless less than half full.
    Yes, I have made a mental note to find and buy a bowl for the express purpose of breakfast porridge! Also, I used my talking weighing scales on the failed porridge day, but rough guesswork for successful ones!
  • Thanks for all the nuked porridge tips! I’m doing the Tearfund mean beans campaign so this info is most useful.
  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    Today would have been my mothers 90th birthday, so down to see my father at his home, he is also 90 and has virtually no short term memory, but today he was in a good mood. It is good to see him happy.

    Late afternoon my daughter and two and a half year old granddaughter were round.

    All told a good day.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate
    I spent the morning reading a book I'm supposed to review. At noon I was collected by a friend, and spent much of the afternoon getting my weekly chemotherapy infusion. I came home and rested for a bit (I was a little woozy, and really had no choice); then a pair of other friends came by with dinner. I supplied a rather nice bottle of Bordeaux. They just left, and I am ready to collapse. The cats approve of my decision to head to bed.


  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    Pursuing the perfect porridge quest, I called in to local Kitchen Shop this morning where they have a bowl - dark blue which means I would be able to 'see' the white porridge against it! - which is 15 cm diameter and 8 cm deep. Anybody know if its volume would be enough to make the porridge without it boiling over the edge? There was no indication on the bowl of its capacity.
  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    SusanDoris wrote: »
    Anybody know if its volume would be enough to make the porridge without it boiling over the edge?

    If you microwave at a lower setting for a longer time, it won't boil over. I microwave mine in a bowl that holds about twice the amount that I'm cooking. I cook it for nine minutes at twenty percent power, and it comes out just fine.

  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited March 13
    If my maths is correct, the volume would be about 1.2 litres if it were a simple cylinder in shape. But it obviously won't be, and you won't want to fill it to the top, so the useful volume is probably about 0.7 litres.
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    If my maths is correct, the volume would be about 1.2 litres if it were a simple cylinder in shape. But it obviously won't be, and you won't want to fill it to the top, so the useful volume is probably about 0.7 litres.
    Many thanks for working that out. Actually, I think that means that it might wwell be very suitable. The amount of liquid required for one portion is, according to the instructions on the packet, 300 ml, so that the liquid would be less than half-way up the side. The side of the bowl curves outwards slightly too. I'll pop in and purchase tomorrow or Friday.


  • LandlubberLandlubber Shipmate
    @SusanDoris I have very recently let one portion of porridge overflow a bowl that size in a category E microwave: 900 watts. So judging by my mess I think you'd still need to stop it and stir or use a lower power as suggested above.
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    Landlubber wrote: »
    @SusanDoris I have very recently let one portion of porridge overflow a bowl that size in a category E microwave: 900 watts. So judging by my mess I think you'd still need to stop it and stir or use a lower power as suggested above.
    Thank you. For the two edible portions I have made, using the pyrex casserole dish, I did one minute, stir, then 55 seconds - an 850 microwave. I then ate it while the going was good, although it was still a bit runny! :smiley:

  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    Leave it to stand a few minutes takes care of porridgey runniness.

    Those wanting to cut down on the amount of meat in their diet and have porridge oats in their cupboard can do what I do. Buy half the amount of minced beef or lamb, put it into a bowl and add the same volume in oats. Add an egg to bind it and salt and chilli powder to taste. Mix together. Roll into meatballs and chill.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    If your bowl is pudding bowl shape, then the volume of a hemisphere would give a better idea of its capacity. From the figures you’ve given I’d say about 880 millilitres or a pint and a half.
  • May I ask, why not just make oatmeal on a stove, it only takes 5 or so minutes? It seems so much less involved then using the microwave.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    When I make porridge I usually do it in the microwave. We have a scoop (reused from long ago washing powder) which holds just the right quantity of oats for one person, and a small to medium sized mug which holds just the right amount of liquid. Both get tipped into a one pint measuring jug and stirred together then one and a half to two minutes at full power in the microwave gets it almost there. Then stir and back in for another 30 seconds to a minute -watched in case it tries to boil over. That usually does it.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    May I ask, why not just make oatmeal on a stove, it only takes 5 or so minutes? It seems so much less involved then using the microwave.

    My thoughts too, Graven Image. Less chance of boiling over . It also means I use proper rolled oats, not the pulverised oats available in individual serve packets. Some texture to the porridge which I much prefer to smooth liquid.

  • I use proper rolled oats in the microwave - bought in big bags, hence my handful measure.

    The reasons for making porridge in the microwave are that you can put it on and walk away in the morning - to get bathed and ready for work, or whatever, rather than stand over it and stir it. And it saves on washing up - just the bowl and spoon, rather than a bowl, spoon, wooden spoon and pan.

    Mine gets to stand and thicken most days, as I start it off then go away and do something else while it cooks.
  • PuzzlerPuzzler Shipmate
    Some days things just work out.
    Today at Citizens Advice where I am a volunteer advisor, my booked client did not turn up. As well as appointments we also have a drop-in. A man turned up needing help with two long and tricky forms to fill in. He has severe mental health issues, and it had taken him all his courage to come today, to try to get help. An appointment was made for next week, but one form was due back tomorrow. As I was unexpectedly free I was able to see him straightaway. I was able to gain his confidence, so he asked if I could do his second form next week. A few swaps were made to enable this to happen and he was over the moon with gratitude.

    Although we are not a non- religious charity, I firmly believe that this is a way I can serve God as well as my fellow human beings. Today was an extra special way.
  • edited March 14
    Re porridge. No quick oats here. Large old fashioned type. I put usually 1/2 cup oats, a tablespoon of ground flax, some raisins, 1 cup water. 250 ml is 1/2 cup. 2 mins on high in 2600 watt microwave then 5 mins at 40%.

    It's really lovely to put it all in a bowl the night before. We also mix 50/50 oats with Sunnyboy or Red River cereal which are porridge made of cracked wheat, rye, flax. Perhaps you have such things where you are? Gives additional flavour and interest.

    Other things I'm known to add is a few nuts, various spices such as cinnamon, ginger, cloves, a few hot peppers, any sort of fruit. No sugar ever.
  • MMMMMM Shipmate
    At work, which is where I make my breakfast porage, we’ve only got a microwave. I use 2/3 mug of porage oats, a mug of milk and water and cook it for 2 mins on high, stir and then another 2-3 mins. I use a big bowl with a plate over the top. This gives me time to make my tea, turn on my laptop etc. Then I decant it into a cereal bowl, add fruit (at the moment, last year’s soft fruit from the garden, lightly stewed and frozen (but defrosted!)) and a handful of nuts.

    Yum!

    MMM
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    balaam
    Yes, I should be patient and let it stand for a minute!

    BroJames
    Thank you for the calculations. I’ll buy that blue bowl and try it, I think!
    Interesting you were saying about the scoop – I was wondering whether I could find and use one I know is in a cupboard somewhere.

    Graven Image
    Apart from the fact that my non-stick saucepan is many years past it’s use by date, it is the lack of ability to see what I’m doing that is the main reason for using the microwave.

    Lothlorine
    Yes, I too use the Tesco *original* Scotch porridge oates. I tried the packets of instant stuff years ago and it was okay but a bit bland I think.

    Curiosity killed
    I don’t think I’ll try walking away from the microwave until I’ve got it down to a fine art!!

    NoProphet
    Er, um, just wondering - could I book you in to pop in every day for a week or so for a porridge training course?! Souns delicious.
    Actually, I usually add sultanas, and stewed fruit when I have it in the fridge.
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