Books that have been influential in your faith

finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
I'm wanting to put together a list of books to read, books related to faith, or that have been influential in people's faith, whether fiction or non-fiction, classic or contemporary. I'm planning to do a kind of do-it-yourself, at-home retreat, for focusing on God and hopefully deepening and broadening my faith and understanding of God. I was thinking other people might also find it useful to have a thread for recommended faith-related reading. I realise people's lists will be quite personal, and not everyone will find the same books helpful, but I'd love to hear about any books people have found influential in their faith, if you are willing to share.
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Comments

  • ThunderBunkThunderBunk Shipmate
    edited April 22
    H A Williams "The True Wilderness". I'll go into the influence at some point if that would be helpful, but for the moment, I'll just say that word for word, it's the most powerful book I've ever read.

    ETA: except Dame Julian of Norwich's "Revelations of Divine Love" of course - I'd go for the modern Penguin or Oxford editions - avoid the original Penguin Classic though - edited by an idiot who didn't seem to believe women capable of profound thought.
  • Soren Kierkegaard Fear and Trembling - The idea that one can be an existentialist and a Christian, and that the father of existentialism was a Lutheran minister ... a radical juxtaposition of ideas and a call to intellectual honesty and personal responsibility for what-is.

    Martin Buber - I and Thou - a practical primer on approaching relationship with divinity through right relationship with creation.

    AFF

  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    One of the strongest influences on my understanding was the published text of Dorothy Sayers' radio plays,The Man Born to Be King It convinced me that the characters in the Bible were real human beings with individual characteristics.

    Up until the time I read those plays, I had a gut level feeling that the Bible characters lived on a plane far removed from the rest of us.
  • Jengie JonJengie Jon Shipmate
    edited April 22
    C.S. Lewis - Narnia Chronicles, These were the books that made me into a reader with the actual trigger one being Prince Caspian. However, if there is one that resonates with me it is A Horse and His Boy. I know it can be interpreted as racist. What I got from it however was the idea of God travelling with us. I would also have to include Screwtape Letters which for a number of years I read every Lent.

    Vincent J Donovan - The Church in the Midst of Creation - I have read Christianity Rediscovered since but it did not speak to me in the way his second book does. Something about the call to be reformed spoke to my heart. If you want to contextualise that then alongside it put the early Alt.Worship book Prodigal Project by Mark Pierson, Cathy Kirkpatrick and Michael Riddell.

    Two other books to consider Subversive Spirituality by Eugene Peterson and Dangerous Wonder by Michael Yaconelli.

    A fiction book that I found profound was "The Owl Called my Name" by Margaret Craven.

    Poetry-wise then there is Wildgoose by Mary Oliver. I also read R.S Thomas and am trying to find time to read some Thomas Traherne.

    Oh and probably most recent is Aelred of Rievaulx Spiritual Friendship.

    I can go on but I had better stop
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    Thank you. Really appreciate these recommendations.

    Good to know about which translations are best, Thunderbunk. I've been wanting to read Julian of Norwich for a while and had no idea about translations. Also, Thunderbunk, yes, if you want to talk about the influence of that first book, I would find it interesting and helpful, but only if you want to.

    Do go on if you have more, Jengie Jon - if you want to, that is. I'm very happy to hear lots of recommendations.

    The only ones I've read out of all mentioned so far are the CS Lewis ones. I've read all his books except the Perelandra ones, and have found his books very influential in my faith - enjoyed his logical questioning and curiosity, I think because I went to churches where such logical questioning and curiosity wasn't encouraged! Though I think for me the most powerful of his is A Grief Observed, because of his complete honesty in expressing his doubts and anger to God.
  • DafydDafyd Shipmate
    Open to Judgement by Rowan Williams is the most important for me.
  • Curiosity killedCuriosity killed Shipmate
    edited April 22
    Gerard W Hughes God of Surprises and his Walk to Jerusalem - the first one is a book to work through thinking through faith issues, the second is an account of his own explorations of faith.

    Dave Tomlinson Re-enchanting Christianity - which is a way of considering Christianity in a changing world.
  • RublevRublev Shipmate
    If you like vocational stories of faith recommend 'Touched by God: Ten Monastic Journeys' edited by Laurentia Johns. Also 'The Seven Storey Mountain' by Thomas Merton. In fact, anything written by Thomas Merton. Among the spiritual classics, 'The Cloud of Unknowing' and 'The Imitation of Christ' by Thomas Kempis.

    A book that keeps being recommended to me is Searching for Sunday by Rachel Held Evans so I have just ordered a copy of it.
  • Jengie Jon wrote: »
    A fiction book that I found profound was "The Owl Called my Name" by Margaret Craven.

    Until a few years ago, I would have said the same thing. In fact, this was a book that was recommended to me when I was first thinking about ordination.

    Then I met a priest who knew a lot about the specific village where the story was based. The place is notorious among First Nations people for how the children were systematically sexually abused by Anglican priests over a long period of time. The impacts of this abuse still linger. Craven's book may be "fiction" but it portrays an utterly false image of how things were.

  • H A Williams is important to me in two respects: he was a gay man who did not repress his sexuality to make it acceptable to the Church - until he entered the community at Mirfield of course, but the story of that is in his autobiography "Some day I'll find you" - it was more about adapting to his apparently implacable singleness than repressing his sexuality. More importantly, though, the True Wilderness is the account of his own wilderness - his breakdown, and recovery from that breakdown through therapy, and how that was achieved by a slowly incrementally won self-acceptance.

    It's actually a collection of sermons, in which there are many gems, and it means you don't ahve to read it all the way through.
  • H A Williams is important to me in two respects: he was a gay man who did not repress his sexuality to make it acceptable to the Church - until he entered the community at Mirfield of course, but the story of that is in his autobiography "Some day I'll find you" - it was more about adapting to his apparently implacable singleness than repressing his sexuality. More importantly, though, the True Wilderness is the account of his own wilderness - his breakdown, and recovery from that breakdown through therapy, and how that was achieved by a slowly incrementally won self-acceptance.

    It's actually a collection of sermons, in which there are many gems, and it means you don't ahve to read it all the way through.

    That is to say, he tried, but it drove him to the breakdown of which this is in large part an account of his recovery.

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Soren Kierkegaard Fear and Trembling - The idea that one can be an existentialist and a Christian, and that the father of existentialism was a Lutheran minister ... a radical juxtaposition of ideas and a call to intellectual honesty and personal responsibility for what-is.

    When I took existentialism through the mainstream, secular philosophy department at my university, roughly about a third of the lectures were taken up with Kierkegaard, even though the larger focus of the course was on the atheistic thinkers(Nietzsche and Sartre, plus theoretically Heidegger, but the prof didn't get around to that last guy).

    Interestingly, though, when I took a class on Christian existentialism via the Catholic philosophy department, Kierkegaard wasn't part of the curriculum at all. I found that a rather surprising omission, though I guess the prof didn't consider him all that important for the development of Christian existentialism in particular.

    The impression I got from the secular course was that the prof basically just viewed Kierkegaard's Christian concerns as the background for his elevation of the individual against "the crowd", much in the same way that Nietzsche elevated the individual against "the herd".
  • tclunetclune Shipmate
    I'm not sure many folks will share my perspective, but I have been more and more drawn to exploring the text of the Bible. I have been trying to learn enough Hebrew and resurrect my long-neglected college Greek to appreciate the written word of scripture. With that as background, let me recommend a new small book by Robert Alter, The Art of Bible Translation.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    The Idea of the Holy by Rudolf Otto
    The Way of the Pilgrim and The Pilgrim Continues His Way tr. French
    The Orthodox Way by Kallistos Ware
    The Myth of Certainty by Daniel Taylor
    The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    James Kavanaugh's A Modern Priest Looks At His Outdated Church is the one that started it all for me -- that taught me that what the nuns drilled into us in Sunday school -- that "the Catholic Church is the One True Church" -- was simply not true!
  • Corrie ten Boom’s The Hiding Place, a humbling testimony of faith and how to selflessly love others not matter what the cost.
  • Of all things, a book about The Cambrian Explosion and invertebrate anatomy. Wonderful Life, Stephen Jay Gould.

    And a novel, The Cunning Man, Robertson Davies.

    Both of which expanded my views, challenged my narrowness and confirmed nothing. Far too much religious writing waters a reverent flower which doesn't get visited by bees, doesn't set seed, and is confined to the same pot in perpetuity. No challenge.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    edited April 22
    Rublev wrote: »
    A book that keeps being recommended to me is Searching for Sunday by Rachel Held Evans so I have just ordered a copy of it.
    I understood she is in hospital right now, in a rather serious condition.

    :votive:

  • Jengie JonJengie Jon Shipmate
    which is her accou
    Jengie Jon wrote: »
    A fiction book that I found profound was "The Owl Called my Name" by Margaret Craven.

    Until a few years ago, I would have said the same thing. In fact, this was a book that was recommended to me when I was first thinking about ordination.

    Then I met a priest who knew a lot about the specific village where the story was based. The place is notorious among First Nations people for how the children were systematically sexually abused by Anglican priests over a long period of time. The impacts of this abuse still linger. Craven's book may be "fiction" but it portrays an utterly false image of how things were.

    The difference may be that I am not a Priest but a Social Anthropologist of religion and you know the caricature of a social anthropologist that occurs in the book, believe it or not, that is one of the reasons I value that book. It became for me a story against which I could face the big debate of in social anthropological research with a certain moral compass. I am also a missionary kid if only just and with a cross-cultural background. The result of which is that I have been aware of how there is really no single narrative in many situations. I have always seen it as idealised and mythical not reality. After all, if it was true why would a white woman be telling it. Social anthropology has its own internal debate about the relationship between the researcher and the researched and the authority of the text produced by the researcher. It is not a resolved debate. It is quite clear from your comments that Margaret Craven has not lived up to the ideal she herself has espoused. I am not sure whether that reflects on the ideal, that is to take seriously the culture of those we are among.

    Further books include Poustinia by Catherine de Hueck Doherty which I am reluctantly admitting has been more influential than I tend to give it credit for being. It is, I suspect idiosyncratic, look by a Russian immigrant to the US or Canada about her understanding of the Hermit and Peregrine tradition within Russia. Then it is placed within her own lived experience. It is probably thirty years since I read it but there is something there that echoes with the way I have lived my life.

    John Baillie's prayer book A Diary of Private Prayer was from my teens to my thirties my prayer book. It built for me the habit of morning and evening prayer which continues to this day. It is very old fashioned today and very high Reformed in tone but still there is something in it.

    I have been to look this up but I suspect out of Jim Wallis' books it was "The Call to Conversion" that really challenged me to think about social justice and the demands that that had on my life. I am not as good a Christian as Jim Wallis but it is a persistent call. I have not got my response right yet. For the liberal Christians in the generation before me the equivalent text was "Naught for your Comfort" by Trevor Huddleston. I would also add Bob Holman's book "Towards Equality: A Christian Manifesto". There should be Iona stuff but I imbibed Iona by going there and have read widely and I cannot place it down to any singular text.


    *

  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    LeRoc wrote: »
    Rublev wrote: »
    A book that keeps being recommended to me is Searching for Sunday by Rachel Held Evans so I have just ordered a copy of it.
    I understood she is in hospital right now, in a rather serious condition.

    :votive:
    Yes, she is. Reliable updates here.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    For me, it has to be The Way of the Pilgrim and The Pilgrim continues on his Way, translated by R.M. French

    Long ago, I also gained a lot from a book that I suspect is forgotten now, Quoist's Prayers of Life. I also gained a lot from Hilton's Ladder of Perfection. A book I've found enlivening more recently is The Mountain of Silence by K.C. Markides.

    But it has to be the two Pilgrim books that I'd advocate for the essential list.

    I'd also go with what I think @tclune might be implying and say daily, disciplined and repeated reading of scripture, following a lectionary and not just picking the easy or familiar bits.
  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    When I mentioned The Man Born to Be King, I failed to mention that the introduction and the notes about each play were extremely important to me. She discusses the problems of presenting each character as a unique individual; she did a superb job.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I have found this Man Born to Be King book in my public library catalogue, and have reserved it. :smile:
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    Oh, and I should add I was taking the Bible as a given - maybe should have mentioned this. In my do-it-yourself retreat, I am planning to read one of the gospels in detail - I was thinking of Matthew, but not sure yet. Might at some point make a thread in Keryg asking which gospel people would select for reading in detail, and also reading contemplatively as lectio divina, though there may already be such a thread I can find.
  • The Openness of God by Clark Pinnock et al really changed the whole way I look at the world and God.

    Living the Sermon on the Mount by Glenn Stassen changed the way I look at ethics and Christian living.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Yes, she is. Reliable updates here.
    Thank you, Nick.


  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Shipmate
    What appealed to me when I first began reading the Revelations of Divine Love by Julian of Norwich, was that there are two texts. The Short Text was written as a response to the visions she received when she was 30 years old, very ill and believed herself to be dying. For the next two decades she meditated on the visions and then wrote the Long Text when she was 50.

    I was 30 when I read Julian's narratives for the first time and struggled with the medieval concepts and extreme imagery, in part because of my ignorance of medieval theology and mystical writings. I came back to read Julian again as a prayer discipline each morning when I was in my early 50s and it was like discovering a new text, so much resonated and moved me. This opened the door to exploring the writings of medieval women mystics like Hildegard of Bingen, Mechtild of Magdeburg and Marguerite de Porete (there's a fascinating secular and poetic study of her by the poet Anne Carson in Decreation: How Women Like Sappho, Marguerite de Porete and Simone Weil Tell God).

    For anyone wanting an introduction to Catholic women mystics, I'd recommend a book published a while ago by Carol Lee Flinders titled Enduring Grace: Living Portraits of Seven Women Mystics.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    I have so many. Books have been my best and most reliable guides, and my dearest spiritual mentors are writers I have never met in real life.

    When I was a teenager and a young adult it was all C.S. Lewis and Madeline L'Engle for me. I found a combination of rationality and mysticism in their Anglican/Episcopalian spirituality that I rarely found in writers of my own tradition, through there were a few from within my own church that shaped me a great deal, too. Of course Mere Christianity and the Screwtape Letters were the key Lewis texts (after having read Narnia as a child). L'Engle, too, I came to first through A Wrinkle in Time and her other novels, but her nonfiction, particularly Walking on Water, a book about the intersection of faith and art in the artist's life, were very important to me.

    Later into adulthood, after more or less growing up, having children, and questioning lots of things about faith, I've mostly found myself drawn to writers whose approach to Christianity is a bit more unconventional or arrived at by a more circuitous route. Anne Lamott has been the most important writer in shaping my faith as an adult -- not so much her recent books as the early collections of essay/memoir pieces like Traveling Mercies, Plan B, and Grace Eventually.

    In the same category as Lamott, other sort of "spiritual memoirs" that have helped me map my own path have included:
    • Things Seen and Unseen, and Practicing Resurrection, by Nora Gallagher (I'm sad to note in her more recent writing that she is moving away from Christianity)
    • Evolving in Monkeytown (later retitled Unraveling Faith), The Year of Biblical Womanhood, and Searching for Sunday, by Rachel Held Evans (prayers for her recovery)
    • Pastrix and Accidental Saints, by Nadia Bolz-Weber
    • Take This Bread, Jesus Freak, and City of God, by Sara Miles

    Two other writers that have been helpful in other ways -- for thinking through some of the more theological aspects of what I do and don't believe, N.T. Wright*. The book he co-authored with Marcus Borg, The Meaning of Jesus: Two Visions, was probably the most important text for helping me think through different aspects of how we understand Jesus and the gospels (and also a model for how people of faith could disagree with love and respect). Then, in thinking about the intersections of faith, politics, and justice issues, Shane Claiborne has been a huge influence, especially The Irresistible Revolution.

    *It's also perhaps worth noting that it was about 15 years ago when I was doing a lot of reading, discussing in online forums, and wrestling with hard questions about Biblical criticism and historical Jesus research and what all that meant for my faith, when I posted what I'm pretty sure was my very first ever post on Ship of Fools, which I had just discovered via a friend on another discussion board telling us about the Mystery Worshipper. That very first post was to ask for book recommendations -- specifically, whether there were any Christian writers who combined a more small-o orthodox faith with rigorous scholarship and intelligence. Several of the replies suggested I check out N.T. Wright, so in my mind he is always tied up with my early days on the Ship.
  • When I was about 16, David Wilkerson's The Cross and the Switchblade and Ernest Gordon's Miracle on the River Kwai had a great effect on me.
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    The John Spong canon along with The Communist Manifesto.
  • CaraCara Shipmate
    What a wonderful thread. Many books mentioned here have been ones I've also been touched by/found helpful. Much of what Trudy, especially, says goes for me too:
    C. S Lewis, Madeleine L'Engle (in exactly the same order as for Trudy), Anne Lamott, and Nora Gallagher. Plus many many more. Poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins, George Herbert, and e e cummings; Elizabeth Goudge (her novels, in childhood and teens, plus her anthologies like Book of Comfort etc). Julian of Norwich. Testament of Devotion by Thomas Kelly. Sister Wendy Beckett. Frederick Buechner. Kathleen Norris. I should revisit some of these now that my faith is so feeble and flickery.
    Here is a wonderful contemporary book by the poet Christian Wiman that is brilliant and beautiful: My Bright Abyss: Meditation of a Modern Believer. I got halfway through and for no particular reason put it aside, this thread has prompted me to pick it up again.
  • I will offer, quite seriously, Giovanni Guareschi's The Little World of Don Camillo. Don Camillo was a fictional country priest who was completely at ease communicating with God, often using the crucifix in his church as his focus. The beauty of the books lie in the two way communication; the humour is a bonus.
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    I will offer, quite seriously, Giovanni Guareschi's The Little World of Don Camillo. Don Camillo was a fictional country priest who was completely at ease communicating with God, often using the crucifix in his church as his focus. The beauty of the books lie in the two way communication; the humour is a bonus.

    Oh, yes! I totally agree and must revisit soon.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I am appreciating all these recommendations - lots of books I'd never heard of. I have ordered a couple of them used from Amazon Marketplace - Quoist's Prayers of Life and and Williams' The True Wilderness, and also the Dorothy Sayers one I reserved from the library and will collect today after work.
  • Bob Two OwlsBob Two Owls Shipmate
    An odd one here, Phil Barker's De Bellis Antiquitatis (DBA), a set of fast play wargames rules which use a small table and tiny armies. The small armies involved led me to investigate some of the fringe armies, it only takes a few weeks to paint the figures rather than the couple of years or so for a normal wargames army. I ended up collecting armies such as Early Hebrew, New Kingdom Egyptians, Maccabean Jewish, Hussites, Papal States and so on, source reading inevitably led to coming into contact with a lot of Biblical and early Christian history. This rekindled my interest in Christianity after a couple of decades away, I'm a sort of Christian now rather than a radical atheist/atheist Buddhist. Without DBA I would still be playing with the same Republican Roman army I have been working on since the year dot and happily ignoring anything outside of Livy or Plutarch.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I don't think Brother Lawrence's The Practice of the Presence of God has been mentioned yet. I read that in my early 20s and liked it a lot. Just read it again, and still like it.

    Another book I found influential in my early 20s was Hannah Whitall Smith's The Christian's Secret of a Happy Life. I was especially interested in what she said about her Quaker upbringing, and how it had influenced her faith, and what she had accepted and rejected from it. I hadn't known anything about Quakers before I read it, so I was fascinated, and her thought processes resonated with me.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    LeRoc wrote: »
    Rublev wrote: »
    A book that keeps being recommended to me is Searching for Sunday by Rachel Held Evans so I have just ordered a copy of it.
    I understood she is in hospital right now, in a rather serious condition.

    :votive:
    Yes, she is. Reliable updates here.

    Rachel died this morning, aged 37. May she rest in peace and rise in glory. Her writing was an inspiration to me and to so many others.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I was just reading about that on FB. Very sad. I haven't read her books - hadn't heard of her before this thread - but from what people have posted, both here and on FB, about how her books influenced them, I really want to read them.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    Currently re-reading The Way of a Pilgrim, which is out in a new translation via Penguin Classics. Seeing what I saw in it 40 years ago. Even for non-O's I think you might get something from it.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Oh no! That really is sad to hear.

    For all in her that was good and faithful and kind, thanks be to God. May she find rest and welcome.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited May 4
    I nice obituary for RHE from Slate can be found here.

    And another from Religion News Service (via Presbyterian Outlook) is here.
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    RHE 🙏
  • I read RHE’s Year of Biblical Womanhood and loved it. I heard her interviewed on a podcast about her book on the Bible so may start my further reading with that....

    Another vote for Don Camillo from me.

    More recently (10 years ago?) Jesus for president and the Irresistible Revolution by Shane Claiborne were very influential, though I now find Claiborne a bit annoying.
    I’m fairly fond of Richard Rohr - his enneagram book was interesting (if rather wide of the mark at times) and Divine Dance was alright, though I think I’m going to like Universal Christ better.

    Just realising you can trace my faith in this post - ha ha ha. Though I can’t remember many of the books from my old, more certain, days.
    Finding God in the Waves by Mike McHargue is amazing. Very easy to read, very funny, very moving. And, er, bit specialist this but Sin Bravely by Maggie Rowe is brilliant. One woman’s story of what sounds like religious anxiety / OCD / scrupulosity, and how she is admitted to an Evangelical treatment centre, the people she meets there, and what happens next. My next Godly book is likely to be Jamie Lee Finch’s You Are Your Own, I think.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I am now reading The Way of a Pilgrim, recommended here by both mousethief and Enoch. I like this kind of book, where a person is seeking and experimenting and writing about their experience. In an odd sort of way, it reminds me of Thoreau's Walden. And it makes me curious to try for myself what the pilgrim does, in saying the Jesus prayer 3,000 times a day, and see how it influences my prayer and my focus on God.

    It seems this Way of the Pilgrim book is also a key theme in Salinger's Franny and Zooey, which is this month's book group book here in Heaven.
  • TubbsTubbs Admin
    Dave Tomlinson. Post-Evangelical is a bit dated now, but it came along at just the right time for me. I've just started reading the two Bad Christian books and they're resonating in a similar way. (Essential message is God and Christ are fab, church not so much, media portrayals and mental images may be unhelpful).

    Rob Bell's book about the Bible is good as well.
  • Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host
    Tubbs wrote: »
    Dave Tomlinson. Post-Evangelical is a bit dated now, but it came along at just the right time for me. I've just started reading the two Bad Christian books and they're resonating in a similar way. (Essential message is God and Christ are fab, church not so much, media portrayals and mental images may be unhelpful).

    Rob Bell's book about the Bible is good as well.

    Post-Evangelical was really good and important (for me), but I have moved on from there too. It was a good opportunity to rethink.

    Rob Bell was important to me with Love Wins. His understanding of hell as being here on earth, not in the future, has stuck with me.

    Jurgen Moltmann is another author who has been important. I think his understnading of a God who suffers alongside us, with us, has helped me.
  • MoyessaMoyessa Shipmate
    "Boundaries" by Dr Henry Cloud.
  • caroline444caroline444 Shipmate
    Rob Bell was important to me with Love Wins. His understanding of hell as being here on earth, not in the future, has stuck with me.

    Jurgen Moltmann is another author who has been important. I think his understnading of a God who suffers alongside us, with us, has helped me.

    I have been delighted to find I can put Rob Bell's Love Wins on my wishlist at the library, to order in the future. Would like to do the same with Jurgen Moltmann. The library carries several of his books. I'm a real newbie with fairly liberal tendencies - is there any particular title you would recommend?
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    Sinners in the Hands of a Loving God by Brian Zahnd
    Sarah Laughed by Trevor Dennis
    The Gospel beyond the Gospels by Trevor Dennis
    A More Christlike God by Bradley Jersak

    (I think you’ll see a theme here 😉)
  • SirPalomidesSirPalomides Shipmate
    Despite them both being heretics William Blake and John Milton probably did the most of anyone to bring me to Christianity.
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