something's goofy in Circus there Piglet

Piglet you have closed a thread we were enjoying "Roses are Red" which specifically was moved to Circus because we were enjoying it. Which could accept of there was another thing as fun.

Then you started a game called Mornington Cres with out instructions. Certainly hosts may do whatever. But it seems quite unkind to exclude people who don't know the rules. Or perhaps some are not meant to play?

Had PMed you also.

Comments

  • Curiosity killedCuriosity killed Shipmate, 8th Day Host
    The whole point of Mornington Crescent are that there are no rules. It's made up as you go along. And I did link to that information on the thread.
  • Colin SmithColin Smith Shipmate
    Chigwell
  • The whole point of Mornington Crescent are that there are no rules. It's made up as you go along. And I did link to that information on the thread.

    Are those the instructions? So I could post "Portage and Main" in Winnipeg and that'd work? Cool if so. Please confirm and we'll go globe trotting.

    I looked at that link Ck. Didn't get the no instructions aspect.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    Mornington Crescent is supposed to be silliness and confusion - possibly caters more to British sense of humour, but anyone can join in. You could try posting 'Portage and Main' and be told it's wrong or be told it's right - there's no consistency, just random whim.
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    Are those the instructions? So I could post "Portage and Main" in Winnipeg and that'd work? Cool if so. Please confirm and we'll go globe trotting.

    I had actually thought about posting "Times Square."



  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    I used to play the New York City subway.
  • I haven't a clue what you're all talking about.

    If I were an angry janitor, I'd be Char-ing cross.....
  • Doc TorDoc Tor Hell Host
    @NOprophet_NØprofit : "Portage and Main" would put you in huff, and is therefore an invalid move.
  • LeafLeaf Shipmate
    Near as I can tell, the actual game is mock-arguing about the rules of the game. In that, it is similar to Calvinball from the comic strip "Calvin and Hobbes." It is definitely British and pokes self-referential fun at the supposed British love of obscure rules in games. Traditionally it has used stops on the London Underground as if there were directions and rules, but there are none. "Huff, Spoon, Nidd" etc. are all nonsense.

    The game has a high degree of whimsy and shared assumptions about what constitutes place and how to argue the rules.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited May 4
    Crikey. Rather above my head, then.

    I'll get me coat.....

    {{prayers ascending for poor Sister Piglet}}

  • agingjbagingjb Shipmate
    Whimsy? Are we saying that the extended and continuing debate over Graham Garden's inspired or invalid play of "Go To Jail", was mere whimsy?
  • Some might say so.

    Or not.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    Back to the Roses are Red thread. Why the hell was it closed? We were having fun. So what if it started as about Valentine's day? Many threads start about one thing and end up going somewhere entirely different.
  • LeafLeaf Shipmate
    agingjb wrote: »
    Whimsy? Are we saying that the extended and continuing debate over Graham Garden's inspired or invalid play of "Go To Jail", was mere whimsy?
    Mere whimsy? Mere? My dear Shipmate, I hold whimsy in the highest regard, and do not think there is anything "mere" about it. It is theologically possible that whimsy is the source of creation, when God said (sotto voce) "Ah fuck it, let there be light!"
  • Jengie JonJengie Jon Shipmate
    Leaf wrote: »
    Near as I can tell, the actual game is mock-arguing about the rules of the game. In that, it is similar to Calvinball from the comic strip "Calvin and Hobbes." It is definitely British and pokes self-referential fun at the supposed British love of obscure rules in games. Traditionally it has used stops on the London Underground as if there were directions and rules, but there are none. "Huff, Spoon, Nidd" etc. are all nonsense.

    The game has a high degree of whimsy and shared assumptions about what constitutes place and how to argue the rules.

    You can believe this or you can go by Mornington Crescent: A complete and abridged guide to the history and rules of this quintessentially British institution. This being from the same programme as brought you all of these.

  • FirenzeFirenze Purgatory Host, Host Emeritus
    Whimsy, n. playfully quaint or fanciful.

    Can be killed by pinning down.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Back to the Roses are Red thread. Why the hell was it closed? We were having fun. So what if it started as about Valentine's day? Many threads start about one thing and end up going somewhere entirely different.

    Yes. This needs to be re-opened.

    I get host and admin prerogative and complete dictatorial powers etc. But really needful to close it.
  • FirenzeFirenze Purgatory Host, Host Emeritus
    But really needful to close it.

    I cannot construe any other meaning out of that sentence other than agreement that it needed to be closed.
  • Lily PadLily Pad Shipmate
    I too was upset to see the Roses are red thread closed. I thought it was a Valentine's thing to start on an 8th Day Board and then got moved to the Circus because it was a good idea. There are tons of threads that have been left open that are similar in nature. This one has legs.

    On the subject of the Mornington Crescent game, it can really only be played by those who have lived in the UK or are extremely familiar with London. I know people love it and I have no problem with it being there but don't think that it is a substitute for a different conversation that was being used by all.
  • RuthRuth Admin Emeritus
    The first time there was a Mornington Crescent thread on the Ship, I downloaded a London tube map and plotted everyone's moves, using different colors for different people. Eventually I figured it out, or someone explained it, I don't remember, and I had a good laugh at the effort I'd put in. I have always thought it would spoil the fun if the "rules" were laid out in the OP.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited May 5
    Piglet you have closed a thread we were enjoying "Roses are Red" which specifically was moved to Circus because we were enjoying it. Which could accept of there was another thing as fun.

    Then you started a game called Mornington Cres with out instructions. Certainly hosts may do whatever. But it seems quite unkind to exclude people who don't know the rules. Or perhaps some are not meant to play?

    Had PMed you also.
    @NOprophet_NØprofit - I replied to your PM this morning, explaining a little about what Mornington Crescent is, and suggested you follow the links posted on the thread by @Curiosity killed.

    Perhaps it was a mistake to start the thread when most of the Brits would have been in bed!

    As for the Valentine verses thread, as there seems to be a clamour for its return, I'll re-open it.

  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    Piglet wrote: »
    As for the Valentine verses thread, as there seems to be a clamour for its return, I'll re-open it.

    Yay! I take back all the terrible names I called you down at the pub.
  • FirenzeFirenze Purgatory Host, Host Emeritus
    Then you started a game called Mornington Cres with out instructions. Certainly hosts may do whatever. But it seems quite unkind to exclude people who don't know the rules. Or perhaps some are not meant to play?

    Tell you what, start a thread on Hockey. That’ll show ‘em.

    Oh! The good ol' Hockey game, is the best game you can name.
    And the best game you can name, is the good ol' Hockey game.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    Something I'd add is that Mornington Crescent comes out of a tradition of a type of game in the UK where most people don't know the rules - and that is the point. I have no idea if these sort of games are played outside of the UK, but they work like this: people join in by saying something they think will fit the rules, and the few people who know the rules will tell them if it does or not, and say a little about how/why it does or doesn't fit the rules, which makes perfect sense to the people who know the rules, and is sometimes funny and makes them laugh, but sounds incredibly confusing and complicated to the people who don't know the rules. People try to work out what these rules are and say things to test their hypotheses, and are told if it works or not. Gradually people, in turn, realise what the rules are - generally something way simpler than they thought, and quite unrelated to the rules they were hypothesising - and there are lots of 'aha!' moments and laughter, and the few who haven't figured it out are frustrated in a fun way. These games are a lot of fun. Mornington Crescent arose from a culture of those sort of games, and takes it a step further.

    An example: someone will start by saying 'I can go to Manchester but I can't go to London.' People have to take turns saying where they can go and can't go and are told if that is right or not. These sorts of games were really popular years ago when I was at university. I think Mornington Crescent makes more sense, and is more entertaining, if you have a background of playing and being familiar with these sorts of games.
  • FirenzeFirenze Purgatory Host, Host Emeritus
    Possibly. But I think Mornington Crescent owes more to Stephen Potter’s Gamesmanship and Lifemanship books.

    The invocation of arcane rules and references to eg what happened in Poona in ‘22 is very characteristic.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Thanks, all.

  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I'm sure you're right. I haven't read them. I think also the whole concept of humour around arcane rules and references is wrapped up in British culture in general. And so such games don't easily translate across the pond. It's something I've noticed from reading books about British and American humour, and also from living in Canada for a few years. British humour often involves the concept of rules - daft rules, complicated rules, taken very seriously - and also just sheer whimsy, that can't be explained, and is very different from, say, American wisecracking humour.

    When I was living in Canada, I remember watching British comedies and realising they were no longer funny to me in the same way as they'd been funny in the UK, because Canadian culture operates around different norms and values and mindsets. Not that they were no longer funny - but funny for different reasons. The humour my Canadian friends found in them was quite different from the humour I'd been used to finding in them in the UK, because they are bringing a whole different culture to them.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    Ah, I was just thinking this sort of thing should be the topic of another thread, and I see you've created one, Firenze.
  • Firenze wrote: »
    Tell you what, start a thread on Hockey. That’ll show ‘em.

    Oh! The good ol' Hockey game, is the best game you can name.
    And the best game you can name, is the good ol' Hockey game.

    Hoser. Curling maybe.



  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    fineline wrote: »
    Something I'd add is that Mornington Crescent comes out of a tradition of a type of game in the UK where most people don't know the rules - and that is the point. I have no idea if these sort of games are played outside of the UK, but they work like this: people join in by saying something they think will fit the rules, and the few people who know the rules will tell them if it does or not, and say a little about how/why it does or doesn't fit the rules, which makes perfect sense to the people who know the rules, and is sometimes funny and makes them laugh, but sounds incredibly confusing and complicated to the people who don't know the rules. People try to work out what these rules are and say things to test their hypotheses, and are told if it works or not. Gradually people, in turn, realise what the rules are - generally something way simpler than they thought, and quite unrelated to the rules they were hypothesising - and there are lots of 'aha!' moments and laughter, and the few who haven't figured it out are frustrated in a fun way. These games are a lot of fun.
    The card game “Mao” works that way, except if you violate the rules you don’t get any explanation, just a penalty from the dealer. Generally, if you win the game, you’re the dealer for the next round, and you get to add a new rule that only you know.

  • sionisaissionisais Shipmate
    Firenze wrote: »
    Possibly. But I think Mornington Crescent owes more to Stephen Potter’s Gamesmanship and Lifemanship books.

    The invocation of arcane rules and references to eg what happened in Poona in ‘22 is very characteristic.

    Very true, but it would be so very wrong to say what happened in Poona in '22.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    sionisais wrote: »
    Firenze wrote: »
    Possibly. But I think Mornington Crescent owes more to Stephen Potter’s Gamesmanship and Lifemanship books.

    The invocation of arcane rules and references to eg what happened in Poona in ‘22 is very characteristic.

    Very true, but it would be so very wrong to say what happened in Poona in '22.

    Well, true aficionados would know, and more casual players can always look it up.

    Anyone would think that professional matches and tournaments aren't notated in great detail and published.
  • Lamb ChoppedLamb Chopped Shipmate
    Fizzbin. We have those kinds of games.

    Or at least we WILL have it, some day when James T. Kirk gets here.
  • RooKRooK Admin Emeritus
    Now that everything has been cleared up, it is time to close this thread before I convert to Voodoo specifically for the purpose of creating dolls of all of you and stabbing them with pins in their assholes.

    -RooK
    Styx Host
This discussion has been closed.