What is in the picnic basket?

Graven ImageGraven Image Shipmate
For some of us Spring is in the air and it is time for picnics and camping trips. What are your favorite things to eat when enjoy the fresh air? A bottle of wine, some good bread and cheese, and a handful of nuts and dried fruit makes me happy. Oh and chocolate there is always chocolate.

Comments

  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    Mini scotch eggs (make them with quails eggs, they're delicious); spiced lamb meatballs with mint and yoghurt dressing; potted shrimps and a crisp green salad; all washed down with elderflower presse (if I'm driving) or a glass of really cold Vouvray if I'm not.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    Peeled hardboiled eggs with mayonnaise to dip them in.
  • MiffyMiffy Shipmate
    Bread, cheese, crisps, peaches, bananas, and a nice cup of tea.
  • Potato salad with lots of hardcooked eggs within. Bacon wrapped dates. Smoked salmon. Crackers. Some nice fresh mozzarella or feta cheese. Beer of it's hot. Prosecco for those who don't like beer. Cupcakes.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    edited June 1
    Good lamb chops to be cooked over the coals o fBBQ fire. Potatoes and other veges cooked in the ashes and served with butter and pepper and salt. Fresh fruit. A billy can of tea or water from the creek. Perhaps some sqalad, with greens and ripe tomatoes. And of course my dad whose BBQs were legendary for being delicious.
  • caroline444caroline444 Shipmate
    edited June 1
    Ploughman's lunch, with Quorn cocktail sausages & on the vine tomatoes. Do I have to end with fruit? Nah.... Rather a honeyed plum yoghurt from The Collective. Oh, and a lovely mug of builders' tea.
  • One of my favourite memories... One of my closest friends and I went to Shakespeare in the Park (Tempest) and I brought roasted chicken breasts stuffed with mango chutney; tabouli; green grapes and peaches; two very cold bottles of Riesling. That was more than 25 years ago.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    One of my favourite memories... One of my closest friends and I went to Shakespeare in the Park (Tempest) and I brought roasted chicken breasts stuffed with mango chutney; tabouli; green grapes and peaches; two very cold bottles of Riesling. That was more than 25 years ago.

    That sounds fabulous.
  • The5thMaryThe5thMary Shipmate
    I'm doing the Keto thing, so very little carbohydrates for me. Roast chicken (dark meat preferred), fresh bell peppers with Tzatziki dip or fresh guacamole, perhaps a cup or two of fresh blueberries or strawberries, seltzer water with a squeeze or two of fresh lemon or lime. Dark chocolate with almonds.
  • The5thMaryThe5thMary Shipmate
    Lothlorien wrote: »
    Perhaps some sqalad, with greens and ripe tomatoes. And of course my dad whose BBQs were legendary for being delicious.

    It sounds quite sqalad that you're going to eat your poor dad! Will you be barbecuing him with his own recipes?

  • Only if the paper they're printed on isn't soggy, presumably ....

    I did once go to Glyndebourne with my parents (1971), even then it was fabled for its posh picnicking yet I remember nothing about that at all!
  • FredegundFredegund Shipmate
    Depending on where the picnic was, it had to include either sand or wasps.
  • Years ago Canadair (aircraft company in Montreal) did a part barter deal with Spain for planes, bringing in masses of very cheap, very good Union red wine. With a bottle of the wine and a fresh baguette we took my parents on the ferry from Hudson to Oka, bought cheese at the monastery and had a picnic beside the water that will never be forgotten.
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    Wow. Very posh, you folks are. :astonished:

    These days when I go to summer music programs in the park, it runs to chicken: KFC or one of two kinds of Mexican style, Juan Pollo or El Pollo Loco. And sides of potatoes, cole slaw, biscuits (American style) or corn tortillas. And if it is a warm evening I'll buy ice cream bars there at the park.

    Back in the day at the beach, my mom liked to swing by a a seafood place and get some prepared prawns, some crab chunks, cocktail sauce and breadsticks. She brought the sun tea and cookies. And we feasted in the sun. :sunglasses:
  • DormouseDormouse Shipmate
    We've just had a picnic in the Parc Monjuzet in Clermont ferrand...cold chicken, potato salad, tomatoes; home made houmous, bread, runny Brillat Saverin cheese and crisps. With melon and biscuits to finish. I'd've preferred a crisp white wine, but settled for chilled apple juice.
  • Our picnic choice is fresh bread, a selection of good cheeses, salami, olives, anchovies and cherry peppers stuffed with cheese. Add on some good Scotch eggs and maybe a raised pie. Served with grapes and a nice white wine.
  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    Cold fried chicken. Deviled eggs. Potato salad and macaroni salad. Big hero sandwiches, Italian-style. Fresh fruit, plums, peaches, grapes cherries. For dessert, a fruit pie. Lemonade and iced tea. Maybe a very light sparkling wine. Fruit salad made with Midori liquor.
  • Hate to be picky re picnicd. A picnic and a barbeque are not the same thing in my world. The first involves no cooking on site: cold food, carried with you. We have parks where you may not light up a portable bbq and and which provide for boxes at table height for briquettes or wood. Picnic tables are frequent in city parks.
  • daisydaisydaisydaisy Shipmate
    My picnic must have pork pie and crisps. It can have lots of other things too, but is incomplete without these 2 essentials.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Hate to be picky re picnicd. A picnic and a barbeque are not the same thing in my world. The first involves no cooking on site: cold food, carried with you. We have parks where you may not light up a portable bbq and and which provide for boxes at table height for briquettes or wood. Picnic tables are frequent in city parks.
    Same here regarding the meaning of “picnic.”

    There is no such thing here is “a barbecue/bbq.” As used here, “barbecue” as a verb is a method of slow cooking (as in hours) with indirect heat and usually involving smoke. As a noun, in my particular corner of the world, “barbecue” means a very specific kind of pork that has been barbecued. Barbecue is taken Very Seriously here.* A party where barbecue is cooked and served is called a “pig pickin’.” What others call “barbecuing” or “a barbecue,” we would call “grilling,” “cooking out” or “a cook-out,” and the apparatus used for cooking is a “grill.”

    I have to admit that I’ve never been a fan of picnics. Taking food (and cups and plates, etc.) out somewhere to eat while sitting on the ground, and then having to lug stuff back home has never really been my idea of a good time, especially if you factor in the summer heat here. But seeing some of the menus suggested here is encouraging me to rethink my feelings about picnics.


    * And just in case anyone read the Wiki article to which I linked and is wondering: Eastern style over Lexington style. Always.
  • Lamb ChoppedLamb Chopped Shipmate
    We do picnics at Shakespeare in the Park. Which is always a group effort, and tends to include: a vegetarian orzo salad with dill in it (yum); sugar cookies; wine; mini quiches; various junky snack food, such as chips (crisps); strawberries, grapes, cherries (Bing and Queen Anne), watermelon; and various forms of dark chocolate.
  • daisydaisydaisydaisy Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    I have to admit that I’ve never been a fan of picnics.
    I’m with you there. Or BBQs. Unless someone I trust is in charge of catering. I quite like sitting at my dining table with the patio doors open, enjoying my garden in comfort. Unless I’m camping - then I’m fine with it all - better still if someone else is doing it.
  • Graven ImageGraven Image Shipmate
    Daisydaisy, curious what do you like to eat when camping?



  • Lily PadLily Pad Shipmate
    I often send touring cyclists off in the early morning with a lunch. One of the easiest things is a bread roll filled with bacon, tomato, lettuce, and cheese. Avocado too if I have it in the house. I put the mayo in a small container and store it next to a cold juice box or lemonade in a recycled water bottle. Hard boiled eggs, candies, a piece of fruit and home made cookies round out the lunch. I've had lots of messages back with photos of people having a picnic in beautiful settings. They are easy to please and are grateful to have a lunch sent along with them. For many, it is called, "Second breakfast". I'm okay with that. :)

    I notice that when I want to take a picnic lunch for myself or to share, that I automatically go to this option.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    The5thMary wrote: »
    Lothlorien wrote: »
    Perhaps some sqalad, with greens and ripe tomatoes. And of course my dad whose BBQs were legendary for being delicious.

    It sounds quite sqalad that you're going to eat your poor dad! Will you be barbecuing him with his own recipes?
    Oops.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    Hate to be picky re picnicd. A picnic and a barbeque are not the same thing in my world. The first involves no cooking on site: cold food, carried with you. We have parks where you may not light up a portable bbq and and which provide for boxes at table height for briquettes or wood. Picnic tables are frequent in city parks.

    Pond difference. A BBQ can quite easily be a picnic. Thos in my memory are sitting by a creek in the winter sun while dad let fire die right down to hot coals. Meat went into a wire grill and rested directly on the coals. Mum may have done some salad or perhaps just fresh bread and fruit. We sat on the ground, keeping watch for bull ants.

    A picnic table raised the level of formality considerably and we possibly had cold chicken or similar. BBQs were better as it meant less formality and we were probably by ourselves in the bush somewhere. Tables meant parks and people.

  • I'm not much of a fan of picnics - they always seem to generate an inordinate amount of wasted food - plus I like a nice cup of tea, and tea from a thermos is, well, OK if you're cold and half-way up a mountain. If I'm taking an individual packed lunch somewhere, it'll be sandwiches (two rounds, ham and cheese is my usual standby, but it depends what we have in the house), crisps (salt & vinegar), and probably an apple (don't try to take bananas in a packed lunch. Just don't.) Perhaps some celery or war carrots. I like pork pies, but they don't really exist over here. And usually water, because thermos tea is a bit disappointing.

    Salads, IME, do not travel well.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    When we lived in Belfast, we had a tradition of once a year going out to Castle Ward (a National Trust place with lots of open areas with picnic tables) for a picnic after Evensong on a nice sunny Sunday. We rarely planned it more than a couple of days in advance (Northern Ireland weather being what it was), so the catering was often courtesy of whichever shop happened to be open, and would include pâté, bread, tomatoes and dips.

    Occasionally we'd be able to plan ahead and buy disposable barbecues, steaks and hamburgers, and there was always wine, except on the memorable occasion when my parents were over on holiday, and had been deputed to bring the wine from our house, and they forgot. This was an unmitigated disaster, as in those days you couldn't buy wine on a Sunday ... :flushed:
  • Beyond barbeque and picnic, there's a wiener roast which means things on sticks held in the fire, like wieners and marshmallows. A cookout signifies something big.

    We bbq everything: hamburgers, fish, vegetables, flat bread. Is there anything that cannot be made on a barbeque?
  • Lamb ChoppedLamb Chopped Shipmate
    Icecream
  • RoseofsharonRoseofsharon Shipmate
    My brother's home-made curry patties would be top of my list, but he lives too far away to get those :(
    Not that we picnic much these days. I don't really like outdoor eating.

    But, in my picnicking days, it would probably have been wedges of tortilla (Spanish potato and onion omelette), or frittata if I'd had any leftover cooked veg to use up. Cherry tomatoes, sliced peppers & celery, courgette batons (they travel better than cucumber) garlic mayo, a "French stick", humous, pretzels.
    Tap water to drink - part-full bottles frozen overnight and topped up just before we leave.

  • Packed lunch and so picnic for me often means oatcakes, cheese chunks and crudites - so fingers of cucumber, carrot, peppers, baby tomatoes, celery, peas (mange tout, sugar snap or needing podding), lettuce leaves; or crudites with hummous; or with my daughter, wedges of homemade gluten-free quiche and salad or homemade pizza wedges and salad. Fruit for pudding - grapes, nectarines, apples or pears all work. Crudites work well as a salad alternative and usually last a bit better.
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    We hadn't had a picnic for years, not since the children were quite small. Back then it was sandwiches (ham or cheese), bags of crisps and a selection of chocolate bars with an occasional token piece of fruit.

    A couple of weeks ago we were away and met up with some very old friends who had brought a picnic for us to share. It involved cooked, spicy chicken legs, nice brown rolls, loads of salad stuff (such as unusual green leaves and nasturtium flowers), peppers, cucumber, olives, and several different kinds of fruit. Most delicious and helped me to feel a bit more inspired about future occasions. Frittata is a good idea.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Lothlorien wrote: »
    Pond difference. A BBQ can quite easily be a picnic. Thos in my memory are sitting by a creek in the winter sun while dad let fire die right down to hot coals. Meat went into a wire grill and rested directly on the coals.
    A pond difference indeed, and then some, Lothlorien.
    We bbq everything: hamburgers, fish, vegetables, flat bread. Is there anything that cannot be made on a barbeque?
    Well, we’re on the same side of The Pond, but down here, where there’s no such thing as “a barbecue” to start with, none of those things can be barbecued. (At least, I can’t imagine any of them would taste at all good after being barbecued.). Grilled, however … yum!

    Ah, English. :wink:

  • daisydaisydaisydaisy Shipmate
    Daisydaisy, curious what do you like to eat when camping?
    I’m not sure what I like to eat while camping. Regardless of whether it’s tent or caravan it’s usually several tins thrown in a pan on one ring to come up with “thing”. One of these days I’ll try out the caravan grill and oven. I don’t see the point of a BBQ for one, especially as I rarely eat meat and veggie options are a hassle or limited.
  • sionisaissionisais Shipmate
    The5thMary wrote: »
    I'm doing the Keto thing, so very little carbohydrates for me. Roast chicken (dark meat preferred), fresh bell peppers with Tzatziki dip or fresh guacamole, perhaps a cup or two of fresh blueberries or strawberries, seltzer water with a squeeze or two of fresh lemon or lime. Dark chocolate with almonds.

    Tzatziki is an essential accompaniment to cold chicken. Our most successful was probably a church picnic on the beach. Everyon ostensibly catered for themselves but the gannets descended chez Sioni for our pitta bread, stuffed with tandoori chicken, salad and Tzatziki. There was home made potato salad too. We just about fought them off so we didn't go hungry, but I have fought seagulls off fish and chips more easily.
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