AS: Canada; the first year of the next 50

245

Comments

  • edited April 2018
    I lived in Winnipeg for a while some decades ago. One of my kids was a naturalist at several parks in the area a decade ago. We still visit periodically. The city itself has taken pains to create things to see and do: The Forks, the zoo and Assinboine Forest, Bird's Hill prov park just north, Grand Beach, Gimli area - Hecla prov park in the Interlake, Lake of the Woods on the Ont-Man border. To my way of thinking, Winnipeg is a gateway to the north and to the east the Canadian Shield country. It's country where you really want to have a canoe. Or a boat if on bigger lakes. Mosquitos? Not so big a deal if you avoid mid-June to July. Not the greatest in winter. Better is to go the mountains in winter.
  • sabinesabine Shipmate
    edited April 2018
    Lily Pad, I've been to Ottawa and will probably go elsewhere. But there is a story about Winnipeg.

    Years ago, I planned a trip to Calgary. But I became very sick (Asian flu) and had to cancel. During my recuperation I spent time researching all the Provinces, and something about Manitoba grabbed me and has never let go.

    So it's next on my list.

    ETA: I suspect I won't have to look far to find a Mennonite Church. :)
  • john holdingjohn holding Ecclesiantics Host, Mystery Worshipper Host
    sabine wrote: »
    Hello Canadian Shippies. A friend and I are planning a vacation in Winnipeg sometime in the next couple of years (no date set).

    So, of course I'd like to know if there are Shipmates there.

    I'm spending way too much time on the tourism sites these days. It all looks good, and I wish I had forever to explore. :)

    There are, or at least a couple of years ago there were, as many as half a dozen shipmates in Winnipeg. Four or five years ago we had rather a fine lunch shipmeet, as I recall, and Leaf gave my wife and me a lift to where we had left the car -- as usual, even in my former home town, I had misread the map.

    As for when to visit, try for late August - late September. Mostly the mosquitoes are gone, and the weather should be neither too hot nor too cold. DO NOT, under any circumstances, try to visit WInnipeg in April or May -- potential flooding, late snow, mosquitoes -- any or all of the above.

  • sabinesabine Shipmate
    Thanks for the advice, John. When it's time I'll post a Winnipeg meet and see if anyone responds.

    Aoril May not on the table. We're actually thinking of September, but we also have an interest in Folklorama which happens in July.

    But nothing is happening this year.
  • LeafLeaf Shipmate
    Hey sabine! I'm in Manitoba. I would be happy to advise/assist with your travel here.

    I love living here, and I say that having lived in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Ontario. This is a great place. It's not perhaps the most obvious spot for visitors from the UK - it's rather like a visitor from North America choosing to give both London and Edinburgh a miss in favour of Manchester :smile: Foreign visitors tend to cluster at Niagara Falls or Banff, and Winnipeg is a very long way from either. However, pardon the cliché, it has its own charms.

    Feel free to PM me if you'd like more info/suggestions. Happy travels!

  • sabinesabine Shipmate
    I have PMd you, Leaf. Thanks so much.
  • sabinesabine Shipmate
    Thanks, Leaf
  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    Hope everybody is doing ok with our strange weather across the country. We had shingles going flying in high winds in Toronto yesterday.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Our weather has been making the news for the last few days: the river's higher than it's been for over 40 years, and several dozen people have had to evacuate their houses.

    We're lucky that our place is well above the river, and on the south side, which hasn't been nearly so badly affected as the north. If the floods reached us, the whole of Fredericton would be under water.

    @Caissa , how are things down your way?
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    Just saw your question, Piglet. We are high and dry. My parents live off the Westfield Road and were restricted in how they could get out of their street and into town. I have a sister that lives in Grand bay and she was far away from the water.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Glad to hear you're OK. The water level here has gone down a good bit in the last couple of days, but a couple of our friends have had their cottage flooded - for several days they couldn't even get along the road to find out how badly affected it was.

    Even once the water's subsided, there are all sorts of other issues like contamination of wells, lakes that won't be safe to swim in and that sort of thing; and they're reckoning that the fiddleheads from the lower reaches of the river aren't going to be edible. :cry:
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    The greengrocer's stand at the foot of the road below us opened for the summer yesterday, and he had fiddleheads (from up-river!), so I bought some.

    happy piglet
  • sabinesabine Shipmate
    edited May 2018
    Just popping in to say I'm for the Jets in the NHL playoffs. No teamis representing my area, and let's face it, Winnipeg is the only city remaining in the playoffs where ice occurs naturally in the wild. :)
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    Piglet, we have had two feeds of fiddleheads so far this year. Pricey but worth every former) penny.
  • Fiddleheads are glorious. Had them last year for the first time in decades. Cost was $9 for a two person serving.

    Meanwhile, fire ban in all campgrounds and parks. Smoke in the air. Nice local rain, but not in the north.
  • Re: Winnipeg

    Oh, Jeez, not in winter! I come from northeastern Ontario, and love winter (my favourite season - in high school I sometimes skied to school), but they don't call it Winterpeg for nothing. That corner of Portage and Main is brutal. That said, as an Ontarian and living in the (unfairly!) much loathed Toronto, people from the prairies (though, that's a geographically inaccurate term) are mostly the Salt of the Earth. The ballet company in Winnipeg is superb, or, was (Long time since I've seen them, so I don't know their current state.)
  • OgtheDimOgtheDim Shipmate Posts: 8
    There is something to be said for that short bit of summer in this province before it gets annoyingly humid.


    *******

    Thanks for the actual thoughts & prayers back in April. Unfortunately now every time I see somebody supporting incel type thinking I just want to :rage: Jordan Peterson already was a bastard but now he's doubling down on idiocy.
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    Today, I am ashamed to have been born in Ontario.
  • Caissa wrote: »
    Today, I am ashamed to have been born in Ontario.

    Sometimes I think that democracy is a mistake...
  • Lily PadLily Pad Shipmate
    Seems we're into a time of extreme polarization. No one on my Facebook feed is in the middle. They are either thrilled with the results or devastated by them. I'm glad I don't live there. Over here, it looks like the Green Party had better be ready for governance next time around. No one seems happy with the current bunch and the chatter seems to be that it is time to give the Greens a shot.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Caissa wrote: »
    Today, I am ashamed to have been born in Ontario.
    At least, as you don’t live there any more, it's not your fault.

    Why on earth would anyone want to vote for someone with a reputation like Ford's?

    Or has Mr. Putin been playing silly-buggers again? <paranoid>
  • This is a little happier. Saskatoon honours Joni Mitchell. Her "River" is the South Saskatchewan.
  • The real test for Doug Ford will be his first real Question Period. All politics is local, as Tip O'Neill said, but being premier is more than garbage collection and getting rid of graffiti (which I quite like, if it's good, not mere tagging). How Ford would deal with something, e.g., Charlottetown Accord, or Night of the Long Knives (Canadian edition), I cannot begin to imagine. I wonder what Ford has in the way of any provincial vision (let alone national), given that Ontario is one of the most irrationally configured provinces. Can someone who seems to have trouble thinking himself out of the suburbs understand the vast (NDP controlled) northern hinterland?

    Just out of curiosity, in the event that the law suit launched by his sister-in-law proceeds, would he have to step down, even temporarily? And who would take over the premiership, either pro tempore or permanently? Would caucus vote amongst themselves, as was once the case? Over to you, Augustine the Aleut (or anyone else with actual knowledge of the niceties of this).
  • john holdingjohn holding Ecclesiantics Host, Mystery Worshipper Host
    My own guess is that he has less than 12 months before his party knifes him in the back and calls another leadership convention. He's going to do (or try to do, since he doesn't really know what he can do) so many stupid, non-Conservative things, that any non-policy issue will take him over the top. Not right away, but in a matter of months.

    Best guess for interim leader -- someone who doesn't want the leadership, which rules out most of the obvious choices. We'll have to see who's in the cabinet.
  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    Just out of curiosity, in the event that the law suit launched by his sister-in-law proceeds, would he have to step down, even temporarily? And who would take over the premiership, either pro tempore or permanently? Would caucus vote amongst themselves, as was once the case? Over to you, Augustine the Aleut (or anyone else with actual knowledge of the niceties of this).

    I don't know, but I don't think so. I can't think offhand why being the subject of a civil lawsuit would require him to step down.

    It will be, er, interesting to see what happens in the next four years. I'm not quite a pessimistic as I was when Trump won, but the downside risks remain pretty staggering.
  • On my way home from the dentist this evening, I stopped in for a pint at not-my-local, but conveniently between office and home. Tapping away on my laptop I overheard bartender and regular talking about Trudeau vs Trump. Given the cross-party support for Trudeau (most notably, Stephen Harper defending Trudeau on Fox News, and the unanimous motion of support in the Commons), I was astonished how they felt that Trudeau was stupid, that he probably said one thing in the private meeting and a different thing at the news conference at that end of the G6+1, and that for all our benefits, he should have caved. When the NDP, Conservatives, and Greens line up behind the PM, but the pub convo is still against Trudeau, it demonstrates that there does exist a visceral dislike of Trudeau that can never be "argued out". I suppose that there are those who will never like me, but the nation's fate doesn't hang on how people feel about me.

    It's good to get out of the Bubble. Very educational.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    What is the pub population's beef with Trudeau? The media down here are often fawning and in awe of his every action. Which could annoy people I suppose.

    (I pop in and out so if I missed a discussion upthread just let me know and I'll read)
  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    I think he just gets on some people's nerves -- he's a young(ish), charismatic leader with a definite style and a way of playing to his base that's not going to be everyone's cup of tea. (He gets on my nerves sometimes, and overall I think he's doing a pretty good job.)

    I think the obvious signs of adulation from some parts of the media probably contribute to that effect...
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I get the feeling that Mr. Trudeau is one of the few gentlemen left in world politics, and I think Trump's acting the bully-boy because he thinks he can get away with it (and because he doesn't know any other way of acting).
  • Trudeau's problem (such as it is) is that he is very good at presentation but rather lite (sic) on policy and action. This seems to make him appear a bit of a lightweight who just goes around smiling all the time.

    I actually think, though, that what he is doing is exactly what Canada needed after the Harper years - he is focusing on re-establishing the Canadian psyche. "Canadians are nice and helpful and peaceable. Canadians are naturally peacemakers rather than warmongers. Canadians care about the environment and about refugees." All this seems in contrast to Harper, who appeared to want Canada to become a "big boy", joining in with American military ventures and so on.

    Trump, of course, sees all this as weakness and so something to be exploited and mocked.

    The Doug Ford election in Ontario, though, does show that even Canadians are not immune to the type of mindless nationalist populism that is infecting so many countries at the moment. I truly worry about where our world is going.
  • Climacus -

    For one thing, Trudeau is seen as not being anywhere nearly as bright as his father (probably true), but kind of a "himbo". Trudeau does benefit from having a pretty deep bench in the Commons. When he achieved gender parity in his cabinet, some saw it as tokenism and political correctness, but he chose women of considerable ability, and I can't think of any major misstep by any of the ministers - at least, not at the moment. As pointed out above, he does rub some people the wrong way, and regardless of what he does, they won't like him. I'm sure that had he caved to Trump on NAFTA, the same guys in that pub would have been calling him a pussy, or worse. As with any politician of whatever stripe, there will always be people who won't like you. Walking on water? What a show-off!
  • ... As with any politician of whatever stripe, there will always be people who won't like you. Walking on water? What a show-off!
    What's the matter? Can't he swim?
    :wink:

  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    Trudeau's problem (such as it is) is that he is very good at presentation but rather lite (sic) on policy and action. This seems to make him appear a bit of a lightweight who just goes around smiling all the time.

    Trudeau has the strange talent of appearing to be a lightweight even the considered as a whole I probably wouldn't describe his government that way. They seem to be trying to do some sensible things, though not overnight.
    I actually think, though, that what he is doing is exactly what Canada needed after the Harper years - he is focusing on re-establishing the Canadian psyche.

    Harper always struck me as having some serious anger issues that drove his government's policy to a surprising extent. Whatever his faults, at least that's not the case with Trudeau.

  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Thank you all of you for those insights. Greatly appreciated.

    Sometimes I think politicians are damned in our eyes if they say the sky is blue and damned if they say it's red. A tough gig at times. (Though many don't help themselves much...)
  • The real test for Doug Ford will be his first real Question Period. All politics is local, as Tip O'Neill said, but being premier is more than garbage collection and getting rid of graffiti (which I quite like, if it's good, not mere tagging). How Ford would deal with something, e.g., Charlottetown Accord, or Night of the Long Knives (Canadian edition), I cannot begin to imagine. I wonder what Ford has in the way of any provincial vision (let alone national), given that Ontario is one of the most irrationally configured provinces. Can someone who seems to have trouble thinking himself out of the suburbs understand the vast (NDP controlled) northern hinterland?.

    What do you want to know? It exists because Oliver Mowat (Farley's great-uncle) pushed Ontario's boundaries into the Northwest Territories/HBC Lands and the Privy Council let him.

    It is NDP-controlled because the biggest industry is mining, and the miners belong to the United Steelworkers, and Steel are big NDPers. Scratch an NDP member in NE Ontario and you'll find a Steelworker. Or check out the caucus, federal or provincial. Charlie Angus? Steel. Jamie West? Steel. Etc.

    I just got off my local NDP campaign in my riding, we're closing the office tomorrow. We lost by 1800 votes or 3.5% of the total votes cast. Ah well, next time.

    That's wjy I haven't signed in until now.
  • SPK - I'm from near Timmins. I worked in a mine in the north. Don't condescend. You didn't really address my comment. It wasn't about the NDP, it was about how Ford would understand the northern ridings that went NDP (and have done for quite some time), and what I suspect is his lack of vision extending beyond Muskoka, let alone having a provincial or national vision. Don't lecture me about my "homeland".
  • Missed the edit... And I'm aware of the history of the expansion of the province. And I worked on NDP campaigns in the north, so you're not telling me anything I didn't already know.
  • Polly PlummerPolly Plummer Shipmate Posts: 44
    So nice to hear about other countries' political problems: takes the mind off our British chaos.
  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    We're all together in one gigantic handbasket.
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    It seems that a law school will not be viable at Trinity Western.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/trinity-western-supreme-court-decision-1.4707240
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Happy Canada Day, one and all! :smiley:
  • Happy Canada Day!
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Happy Canada Day!

    From me too.

  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Belated Joyful Canada Day wishes!
  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    But we're observing it today too as the day off in lieu, Climacus, so you're not really belated...

    Hope it's not as oppressively hot and humid for some of you as it is here in Ontario.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    It got up to 30° with a Humidex of 36 here in Fredericton today, with a forecast of 32°/40 tomorrow.
    :sweat: :sweat: :sweat:

    We did, however, have a few goldfinches visit our bird-feeder today, which was lovely. :)
  • Thank you to all the non-Canadians for your very good hearted wishes! The widow of a recently deceased friend of mine resurrected their tradition of a Dominion Day (as it should rightfully be called) barbecue. Delicious barbecued ribs, salads, lemon cake with whipped cream and raspberries, and flagons of good wine, accompanied by much laughter from the ages of 6 months to 64 years. How better to celebrate where I live?
  • A white throated sparrow sang "here here Canada Canada Canada" as I sailed past. Sometimes they only sing "here here here here". It was a fine day for it. The day off for the July 1 falling on a Sunday. Yes, I like the sound of Dominion Day. The 30 year olds want to call it "July long". They also trumpet about colonists and settlers. Forgetting the refugees.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    All those deaths from the heat... :cry:

    What are usual temperatures at this time? My thoughts are with all affected by the death, or hospitalisation, of a loved one.
  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    Depends on where you are, but I think generally 5-10 degrees cooler.

    Your post actually prompted me to look it up -- the Globe and Mail has a good explanation of what's going on in Quebec here:

    https://theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-heat-wave-claims-33-lives-in-quebec/
This discussion has been closed.