What is in their shopping cart and should we care?

One of my son's called yesterday a bit upset by what food he sees other people buying. He is a great cook and health conscious. He said while checking out at the market the man in front of him who was very over weight had a cart filled with soft drinks, chips, and micro-wave burgers. (I did not know there was even such a thing). He went on to say many of his neighbors seem to live on junk heat and eat food. I also noted that my check out basket often looks a lot healthier then others in line. So my question is should we care what others are eating?
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Comments

  • tclunetclune Shipmate
    Of course, you should body shame everyone you can every opportunity you get. It's the only decent thing to do.
  • Well...I suppose if the guy in front was very overweight and had a basket full of fruit and veg, that would have been pretty weird! If your basket looks healthier - does it work? Are you in better shape that the people you're queuing up with?

    I wish I'd kept my lent thing up and not gone back on the sugar.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    I’m sure we should care, but I don’t think the checkout queue is a good place to sort things out.
  • Point taken, but the overweight man might not have been buying junk food for himself...

    It does seem to be the case that many peeps do indeed appear to subsist on unhealthy stuff, but that may be (a) their choice, or (b) all they can afford.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    It’s entirely up to them what they eat. But I can’t help feeling smug about my own trolley full of healthy food. :tongue:
  • It's not too difficult to look at someone's trolley and say to them, "Wow, I see you've got some really healthy stuff there!" It is - ahem! - rather harder to openly criticise what appears to be a less healthy set of choices. I don't think I'd do it (tho' Herself and I would probably say something to each other, later, back in the car and well out of earshot).
  • Graven ImageGraven Image Shipmate
    edited July 11
    tclune wrote: »
    Of course, you should body shame everyone you can every opportunity you get. It's the only decent thing to do.
    I did not see it as body shame, but more of a concern about not just his health and well being. but as a general note of the fact that people in our area are not eating well, and wondering if it they are not having the time, interest, or knowledge to cook well for themselves.

  • We get a weekly organic fruit and veg box delivered, plus we grow some of our own food.

    So you won't see much healthy veg in our shopping trolley.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Point taken, but the overweight man might not have been buying junk food for himself...

    It does seem to be the case that many peeps do indeed appear to subsist on unhealthy stuff, but that may be (a) their choice, or (b) all they can afford.
    And if it’s (b), or a variation on (b)*, then yes, we should care.

    Otherwise, it’s their choice, about which we know nothing other than what we see in their shopping cart.


    * Variations could include things like lack of transportation or mobility to get to places where healthier fresh foods can be bought.

  • We get a weekly organic fruit and veg box delivered, plus we grow some of our own food.

    So you won't see much healthy veg in our shopping trolley.

    The problem with that is especially when you bump into other people from the same organic fruit and veg box group in the supermarket.
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    I am less upset about what people are buying than I am when i see them leave with their food in 10-20 single use plastic bags.
  • tclunetclune Shipmate
    tclune wrote: »
    Of course, you should body shame everyone you can every opportunity you get. It's the only decent thing to do.
    I did not see it as body shame, but more of a concern about not just his health and well being. but as a general note of the fact that people in our area are not eating well, and wondering if it they are not having the time, interest, or knowledge to cook well for themselves.

    The full involvement of you or your son in the life of that person appears to be that you actively focused on his choice of food in a way that sure looks judgmental from here.
  • AravisAravis Shipmate
    I used to go to a local greengrocer twice a week, a butcher occasionally and a health food shop regularly, so my supermarket shop didn’t look at all healthy. Presumably the supermarket thinks I’ve turned over a new leaf since the greengrocer closed.
    My daughter’s boyfriend didn’t really eat vegetables when they first met, but I’ve gradually introduced them when he’s eaten with us over the last two years; he’s looking a lot healthier as a result. (His family don’t eat together, either, which doesn’t help.)
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    It's not too difficult to look at someone's trolley and say to them, "Wow, I see you've got some really healthy stuff there!" ).

    Be a bit weird though. I think you might get a lot of people enquiring in what exact manner you considered it any of your business.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    edited July 11
    I was once in Asda, shopping in the reduced aisle, and a chap who seemed to have some kind of learning disability was asking me oblique questions about the various foods on sale - ostensibly suggesting I buy them, but then I realised he couldn't read and he wanted to know if they needed to be cooked, as he couldn't cook. Yes, I cared, and I then searched for all the reduced food that didn't need to be cooked and pointed them out to him, and he put them in his basket. In future of course he will not always have someone to point things out, and he will struggle on. I thought it was a shame he didn't have a support worker helping him with shopping and cooking, but of course I don't know his full circumstances.

    As for people in Asda who are overweight and buying unhealthy food, there are lots of them, but they are not asking me questions or seeking my help in any way, so although I might generally be concerned at the number of people who eat unhealthily (along with the many people who do all sorts of other things that sabotage their health and wellbeing), I don't consider it my business to say anything to them.

    If it's someone I know personally, I might have opportunity to say something if appropriate, but in all honesty, the people I know personally who eat unhealthily and are overweight are fully aware that they could eat differently and lose weight. Some go to Slimming World, and eat healthy meals throughout the week and binge at weekends. Especially when they are drinking alcohol as well - that stops them caring. And of course there's also the aspect that the older you get, the harder it is to lose weight, so easier to just say 'Sod it!' and eat what you like.

    Personally, for myself, I generally eat healthily, but I don't always eat as healthily as I'd like. As someone who finds it very hard to organise my life, and balance self-care in all areas, there are times when I'm not on top of healthy eating. A lot of people struggle with all sorts of things, and I think if I were buying some unhealthy food in Asda and some random stranger took it upon themselves to give me some 'helpful advice' on my eating habits, I might then tell them that if they really want to help, they can come and tidy my house for me, as that's my primary concern, and they can fix various things in my house while they're at it, and then they can buy me a whole trolley full of healthy food and come deliver it to me!
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    Caissa wrote: »
    I am less upset about what people are buying than I am when I see them leave with their food in 10-20 single use plastic bags.

    Each plastic bag with just one or two items in it.
    :angry:

    And why do I need a plastic bag for my purchase when I just have one item and am taking it directly to my car? Some cashiers practically try to force them on me. (I have noticed this a lot more in the U.S. than when I have shopped in other countries.)

  • tclune wrote: »
    tclune wrote: »
    Of course, you should body shame everyone you can every opportunity you get. It's the only decent thing to do.
    I did not see it as body shame, but more of a concern about not just his health and well being. but as a general note of the fact that people in our area are not eating well, and wondering if it they are not having the time, interest, or knowledge to cook well for themselves.

    The full involvement of you or your son in the life of that person appears to be that you actively focused on his choice of food in a way that sure looks judgmental from here.

    Guess we see things differently. Judgement to me includes some sort of blame. It was to me was a reminder of how many people in our area are unhealthy. A few years ago I volunteered when asked by our local Alliance on Aging to teach an eight week class at our local senior center on healthy eating. They found many seniors did not know ways of eating healthy on a budget. We teamed with the local store and garden center to supply information. ( We are a rural area with small population) The conversation with my son made we wonder what food our children are getting in school, and what programs other then for seniors may be available in our community to help others shop more healthy. To me the shopping carts of others could be a sign of how our community is doing, and where we might need to find ways to help each other.
  • HeavenlyannieHeavenlyannie Shipmate
    edited July 11
    We get a weekly organic fruit and veg box delivered, plus we grow some of our own food.

    So you won't see much healthy veg in our shopping trolley.
    I had the same thought, the other shoppers must think we have a completely beige and pink diet. Supplemented by alcohol.

  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    And why do I need a plastic bag for my purchase when I just have one item and am taking it directly to my car? Some cashiers practically try to force them on me. (I have noticed this a lot more in the U.S. than when I have shopped in other countries.)
    I try to say, very quickly, "I don't need a bag for that, thanks."

    Though as the housekeeper for a number of pets, I can vouch for the fact that the bags generally aren't "single-use." :wink:

  • lilbuddhalilbuddha Shipmate
    tclune wrote: »
    tclune wrote: »
    Of course, you should body shame everyone you can every opportunity you get. It's the only decent thing to do.
    I did not see it as body shame, but more of a concern about not just his health and well being. but as a general note of the fact that people in our area are not eating well, and wondering if it they are not having the time, interest, or knowledge to cook well for themselves.

    The full involvement of you or your son in the life of that person appears to be that you actively focused on his choice of food in a way that sure looks judgmental from here.
    I read the post as being concerned. But the glass we look through is often more mirrored than transparent.
    Most fat people* are fat because they consume more calories than they burn. This is not a judgement, but an evaluation.
    For the same level of activity, a person with a recommended level of body fat is more likely to be healthy than one at the level of obesity. This is also not a judgement.
    The average body fat percentage is going up because people eat more unhealthily and exercise less is also an evaluation, not a judgement.
    One can be concerned with all that and the effect of obesity on people's health without being judgemental about people who are fat by their own choices.

    *There are people who have less control over their weight for various reasons not in their control, granted.
  • fineline wrote: »
    I was once in Asda ...

    As for people in Asda who are overweight ...

    I think if I were buying some unhealthy food in Asda ...
    I think that other supermarkets sell unhealthy stuff too - even the sainted Waitrose! (Says he, who shopped at Asda this morning).

  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    fineline wrote: »
    I was once in Asda ...

    As for people in Asda who are overweight ...

    I think if I were buying some unhealthy food in Asda ...
    I think that other supermarkets sell unhealthy stuff too - even the sainted Waitrose! (Says he, who shopped at Asda this morning).

    Of course. I don't drive and Asda is the shop in walking distance from me, so that is where I shop most often and what I am most familiar with. I also live in quite a poor area - originally a council estate - and so the people shopping in this particular Asda are more likely to be on a low income, of a lower social class, and more likely to be shopping more cheaply and more for convenience, and less focused on healthy living. More so than in Sainsbury's and Marks and Spencer, from what I observe when I go to these shops - which are in less poor areas. The sainted Waitrose has not deigned to make an appearance, though there have been rumours for the past few years of one possibly being built.
  • W HyattW Hyatt Shipmate
    edited July 11
    fineline wrote: »
    <snip>

    If it's someone I know personally, I might have opportunity to say something if appropriate, but in all honesty, the people I know personally who eat unhealthily and are overweight are fully aware that they could eat differently and lose weight.

    <snip>

    Italics mine.

    I don't believe that losing weight is anywhere near that simple.
  • JapesJapes Shipmate
    Frankly, anyone who comments to me on the contents of my shopping trolley, for whatever reason, is opening themselves to my frank comments on their inability to mind their own business.

    Have your opinion on the said contents, by all means, but there's absolutely no need to share it with me.
  • OhherOhher Shipmate
    Well, I'll admit to needing to squelch a burning desire to publicly abuse people with carts-ful of individual plastic bottles of water. Then I recall I'm on a city water system with good tasting water, and many around here have private wells, and some private wells yield Truly Awful-Tasting water (one common local flavor being"Rotten Eggs").

    And then I want to suggest they could get one of those nice filtration pitchers.

    And then I remember that none of this is any of my business.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    W Hyatt wrote: »
    fineline wrote: »
    <snip>

    If it's someone I know personally, I might have opportunity to say something if appropriate, but in all honesty, the people I know personally who eat unhealthily and are overweight are fully aware that they could eat differently and lose weight.

    <snip>

    Italics mine.

    I don't believe that losing weight is anywhere near that simple.

    I don't either, and I don't believe I suggested it was simple. I thought the entirety of my post would indicate that. I was talking here about people on low incomes, working very hard at exhausting jobs, who go to Slimming World, largely because it's a fun social thing to do, but also with the idea that they'd like to lose weight, and they enjoy making the fun recipes, but when it comes to it, they are aware that they also want to party hard, get drunk, eat lots of fun junk food, because it's a release after a hard, exhausting week. My point was that if I suggested to them 'Oh, you know, you shouldn't eat that because it's unhealthy and will sabotage your attempts to lose weight,' they would already know this, and it would be patronising and intrusive of me.

  • W HyattW Hyatt Shipmate
    Sorry, my point is just that there's a lot more involved in losing weight than just eating less. If all I do is eat less, my body will just adjust its metabolism to maintain my weight. In fact, I am much more likely to lose weight if I decide to get more sleep than if I decide to eat less.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    Though I didn't say eat less. I said eat differently. But differently can of course include eating less. A lot of people do lose weight if they eat differently and/or less. I do. All I need to do is eat differently and less, and I will lose weight, and I know many others for whom this is the case. But of course it's not true for everyone, as all sorts of other issues can be at play, and it does get harder the older you get.
  • I'm one of those alluded to upthread who shows up with a cart full of healthy things and then gets either a raised eyebrow or a "congratulations on turning over a new leaf!" kind of response, both of which piss me off. Because that's always how we cook. But I have a) genetic problems, b) thyroid and PCOS, c) at least four necessary but weight-inducing medications, and as a result I defy the laws of thermodynamics. But I simply can't go around wearing a T-shirt with my doctor's name and phone number on it, and the first thing he said to me upon studying my chart: "You poor thing, it's not your fault. If anyone says otherwise, tell them to fuck off!"

    Much as I'd like to.

    And it's no good saying "Ah, but you're a rare one," because I follow the scientific literature, and we don't know as much as we think we do--particularly in view of the massive rise in the obesity rate over the past 40 years, without a corresponding massive change in human nature (e.g. laziness and greed).

    Something is certainly going on besides "if you just tried, you could fix this problem."
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    Japes wrote: »
    Frankly, anyone who comments to me on the contents of my shopping trolley, for whatever reason, is opening themselves to my frank comments on their inability to mind their own business.
    Amen. The world is too full of people, it seems, who never learned how to mind their own business.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    'Lord, I thank you that I am not as that thick fat low class person in front of me.

    I eat only organic vegetables and the healthiest of low fat foods. I exercise twice a week. I support all the right causes. I have two children, spaced the correct 2-3 years apart. I do not let them drink fizzy drinks or ice creams. Their lunch boxes only contain the things their school approves of. All the bread we eat is wholemeal. Usually it is sourdough and sometimes it contains spelt. My stomach does not hang over my belt and everybody can see that I am a healthy person.'
  • CathscatsCathscats Shipmate
    :smile: nice one!

    I once encountered a parishioner in a supermarket and, having not seen him for a while asked after his health. His response was "Look what's in this trolley!" In tones of disgust. Since I was invited, I looked and saw fruit and vegetables and whole meal bread etc. A nice healthy trolley-full. "Looks great," commented ignorant me. "No it's not," he replied. "The doctor says I have diabetes and can't have cake or chocolate, but haven't have all this rubbishy fruit and veg."
  • Jengie JonJengie Jon Shipmate
    edited July 11
    Over the last forty years, there has been no change in human nature but a heck of a lot of change in the shopping experience and the agrifood business and if you add in the increasingly sedentary nature of paid employment you get a picture of where it is coming from you get a dramatic change in the living environments many people inhabit compared with that of their parents and grandparents.

    My Grandfather and Grandmother walked into and out of town every time they went shopping. They did not order over the internet, nor did they own a car and until the last couple of years they did not even own a freezer. That meant food shopping had to be done several times a week. I am, like them, car less but the big shop every week gets delivered to my door. My sister just goes to the supermarket and loads up her car as did my parents until they were too old and frail.

    Humans evolved to cope with situations where living was a struggle and getting things that helped was a good trait. So we learnt to desire the things that were either in short supply or gave us a direct gain: sweetness, fat and salt. In an environment where sweetness and salt were rare and difficult to come by and fat was mainly got from animals and limited because animals are either hunter or hunted it makes sense to desire these. When they are simply a matter of phoning up on your mobile phone and delivered to your door then it is a different story. In other words, our technological development has removed a physical restraint and human nature was not ready for the freedom precisely because it had not changed.

    In some ways, it is useful to care. Social deprivation is a key factor in survival rates and without a doubt, food choice is part of this. There are many factors that lead to poor dietary choices and the common assumption that it is lack of desire is probably only a minor part of it. I would suggest the following play significant roles
    1. Lack of time: many poor people are working at multiple jobs to keep their heads above water
    2. Lack of finance: when you can feed on burger and chips for half the cost of a proper meal and your budget is tight what are you going to do
    3. Lack of skill: cooking from fresh takes effort but even getting the household to sit down together is a practice unfamiliar to many
    4. Lack of adventure: when all you are used to a traditional meal will you really be into the next superfood.
    5. Lack of facilities: cooking from fresh assumes access to an oven, which implies the power is on. Even opening a can implies that you have a can opener.

    The point is that we should care but by caring we should find out why and then seek to find ways to address it.
  • ZacchaeusZacchaeus Shipmate
    On the monthly ‘fill up the freezer with quick fix meals for when I have no time to cook’ Asda shop (other supermarkets are available).
    I look at the less than healthy food in the trolley and do find myself with the need to apologise for my trolley contents and to explain why it is there - just in case the food police are nearby.
  • ThunderBunkThunderBunk Shipmate
    I believe that this question is more nuanced than some people are acknowledging. If the way society is structured is forcing people into eating food that is bad for them, then the structure of society, including the distribution of both wealth and knowledge, is toxic. Equally, so is the snobbery, including inverted, which equates working class with unhealthy. If we're not doing the labour, eating the stodge is a potentially foolish thing to do.
  • I put crisps in the trolley this morning. We don't have them often, so they're a treat. Does that make me a bad person?
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    There’s a Punch cartoon c early 20th C of the ‘prentice fisherman returning to the boat with a basket of supplies - 6 bottles of whisky and a loaf - to the greeting ‘Whit are ye wanting wi’ all that bread?’

    I often think of this when we go to Aldi, which we hit mainly for their wine and own-brand gin. Otoh, if you saw us leaving Lidl you’d think we lived off high-cocoa chocolate, charcuterie and frozen prawns. The Chinese shop - noodles, soy and Tom Yum stock cubes.

    If you want to check up on my fruit and veg consumption, you’ll need to follow me into Sainsburys, Morrisons or Waitrose.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I believe that this question is more nuanced than some people are acknowledging. If the way society is structured is forcing people into eating food that is bad for them, then the structure of society, including the distribution of both wealth and knowledge, is toxic. Equally, so is the snobbery, including inverted, which equates working class with unhealthy. If we're not doing the labour, eating the stodge is a potentially foolish thing to do.

    I don't think it's necessarily snobbery to see links between low income and less healthy eating. I read an article, which I thoroughly agreed with, that said that when you are very tired (which is more likely when you are working hard, often in several jobs, and working class jobs generally are more hard work, and these days not necessarily simply manual labour - life is more tiring, and often you are commuting by public transport, which also takes longer and is more tiring), your ability to think ahead and make wise, non-impulsive choices is compromised. I know that is definitely the case for myself. Also, when you are living hand to mouth, when you can't plan ahead financially, when you can't afford things to improve your life, you often don't have that motivation so much to think ahead, and you live more for the moment. This doesn't mean, of course, that all working class people eat unhealthily, or that all upper middle class people eat healthily, but I'd say as a generalisation it's easier for an upper middle class person to eat healthily. Obviously each individual is different, and there will be plenty of exceptions to the rule.

  • My name is Gamaliel and I am Judgemental.

    I am Judgemental of the lard-arses at the supermarket check-outs with their trolleyfuls of shit.

    I am Judgemental of the blokes who ought to know better who fill their trolleys with cheap and fizzy piss when there are a lot better alternatives available even in discount stores.

    But I keep it to myself. I wouldn't dream of leaning over to the shopper in front of me and saying, 'Oi, fatso ...'

    My brother once did a pizza delivery round in South Wales, difficult when you can drive up and down the Valleys and not across them.

    He delivered to one woman who had ordered practically everything on the menu, pizza, chips (fries), side dishes, sauces, you name it. The delivery bag was bulging. The woman was immense. As my brother stacked the order up and took payment she snapped, 'Where's my drink? Coke, I ordered Coke ...'

    As he reached into his bulging bag and took out a bottle of Coke she cried, 'No, no, Diet Coarke, I en 'avven i' if i' 'en Diet Coarke ...'

    Poverty. Class. Poor life choices. Judgmentalism. Discuss.
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    edited July 11
    Since I have been on the Noom diet and am in the process of losing weight, I have to admit I am more sensitive to the weight of others these days.

    Officially, it is said 35% of Americans are obese. I happen to think it is much more.

    Why should I care?

    Should I care of the health of others? Yes, especially when their obesity impacts my health care costs. But, also, because I do not want to see them die any sooner than they have to.

    Should I care about the impact their eating has on world resources? There is a simulation we have done on World Hunger Day. We invite 100 kids to participate in a Hunger Dinner. 1/3 of the kids will be given less than a subsistence diet. 1/3 of the kids will be given a subsistence mea1 while 1/3 will be allowed, even encouraged to eat anything and everything they want. I have always found it interesting the less than subsistent and subsistence dinners will share what they have quite readily, but those who are given everything they want to eat become rather stingy with what they have

    Should I be concerned about how overeating impacts the environment? The OP mentions microwavable burgers. Beef is one of the most inefficient ways of producing protein. Cattle have a great impact on the environment through the methane they produce, the amount of water it takes to produce their food, and the overall transportation costs involved from when the calf is conceived to the time the consumer will eat it at a meal.

    One of the biggest hoaxes the sugar industry had every pulled of on American society is that we should all become fat-free. In 1960 obesity was around 15%. Then fat-free became the craze. Now it is 35%? We do need some fats to flavor our food. Remove the fats, one has to find another way of flavoring. Sugar fit the bill.

    Me? I admit I was a food junkie with the best (worst?) of them. At 6'3" (1.83 m), I weighed 354 lbs (161 kg). Now I am down to 319 lbs (145kg) My goal is to get down to 230 lbs (104 kg). At the rate I am going, it will take me well into next year.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    What does bother me, and I find myself having a bit of a gut reaction of judgement to, is waste. So many people seem to think nothing of throwing away food - they prepare more than they need, and then throw away leftovers, and can be quite scornful of or disgusted by the idea of eating leftover food. Or they will throw away perfectly good food that has passed its sell-by date. And it often seems to be people who are quite well off, and who think nothing of it, as it makes no difference to them, and I think about how many people could have been fed on the amount they wasted.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    As a fasting church that includes many people at different parts of their journey, we have a saying.
    .
    Keep your eyes on your own plate.
  • We're paying between 5 and 40 cents for some types of packaging and bottles. "Deposit" its called. It encourages recycling. The bottles are handled by an organization province wide called SARCAN. Which provides employment to people with intellectual and physical disabilities.

    Even with this social positivity, the problem with single use plastics really strikes me as awful. We're seeing cucumbers and eggplant (brinjal, aubergine) shrink wrapped in plastic.

    There's talk of additional taxes on sugary junk foods. Seems like a good plan.

    It is standard that people are told they're not having certain surgeries if obese. Risks too high.
  • Apparently there's a real benefit in shrink wrapping cucumbers - it stops them drying out and gives them a better shelf life so reducing food waste. We don't see aubergine shrink wrapped here ever, just loose on the shelf. But the plastic wrapping is scary - plastic boxes for soft fruit (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries), nectarines and apricots. Sometimes, rarely, you can find them in cardboard boxes. Avocados do come loose but also wrapped in plastic trays. Continuing use of black plastic trays that cannot be recycled (the clear and white are not so bad).

    We're having conversations about sugar tax over here in the UK too. Some of the drinks manufacturers have reduced the sugar in their soft drinks ahead of the tax.

    There are a group of us who buy food when it's reduced for quick sale at the end of the day - and we tend to share things out to an extent (we all got raspberries and strawberries last night - but one person grabbed the apricots). And we make sure the older widowers and not so well old boy with Parkinson's gets handed food that doesn't need cooking and is healthy. It means I usually get any rhubarb going and I often get handed any gluten free.
  • ZacchaeusZacchaeus Shipmate
    On the monthly ‘fill up the freezer with quick fix meals for when I have no time to cook’ Asda shop (other supermarkets are available).
    I look at the less than healthy food in the trolley and do find myself with the need to apologise for my trolley contents and to explain why it is there - just in case the food police are nearby.
  • Simon ToadSimon Toad Shipmate
    In the words of one of Catherine Tate's characters, it's a kuffing liberty to advise or criticise someone on the contents of their shopping trolley. I am assuming you are not their dietician on a shopping trip with them.

    You also can't tell people not to smoke where it is lawful to smoke, not to drink booze where it is lawful to drink booze and not to smoke dope in the State of Colorado and elsewhere.

    It really is not on to talk to strangers about their personal habits, and it is barely on to do it to family members

    There are plenty of ways to tackle these issues and they all involve the Government. The Government is the only body authorised to talk to strangers about these issues and only through advertising.

    Really and truly what an extremely rude and potentially hurtful thing to say to someone.
  • The issue is not what people have in their trollies but why the shops feel they have to sell them in the first place.
  • I have to wonder when our general eating habits changed, and why. Just over 100 years ago most of our population were farmers, they raised and grew their own food. They worked hard and yet for the most part, but not always. ate fairly well even if poor. I know for my grandparents generation there was a garden, chickens, a pig, and hunting and fishing to put food on the table. I am old enough to remember in the cities of the USA many having a little victory garden during the second world war. My mother grew some of her food and canned for the winter even though we lived in the city. I am guessing something happened at the end of world war two to make already prepared food cheap, and add that with easy, and good tasting and we end up where we are today. So in several generations people have lost the knowledge to prepare food, the means to purchase it, and a real disconnect with the source. Even though I live in a rural area the crops are grown for profit and very few people have a family vegetable garden or raise any livestock for food, other then chickens for eggs.
  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    fineline wrote: »
    I believe that this question is more nuanced than some people are acknowledging. If the way society is structured is forcing people into eating food that is bad for them, then the structure of society, including the distribution of both wealth and knowledge, is toxic. Equally, so is the snobbery, including inverted, which equates working class with unhealthy. If we're not doing the labour, eating the stodge is a potentially foolish thing to do.

    I don't think it's necessarily snobbery to see links between low income and less healthy eating. I read an article, which I thoroughly agreed with, that said that when you are very tired (which is more likely when you are working hard, often in several jobs, and working class jobs generally are more hard work, and these days not necessarily simply manual labour - life is more tiring, and often you are commuting by public transport, which also takes longer and is more tiring), your ability to think ahead and make wise, non-impulsive choices is compromised. I know that is definitely the case for myself. Also, when you are living hand to mouth, when you can't plan ahead financially, when you can't afford things to improve your life, you often don't have that motivation so much to think ahead, and you live more for the moment. This doesn't mean, of course, that all working class people eat unhealthily, or that all upper middle class people eat healthily, but I'd say as a generalisation it's easier for an upper middle class person to eat healthily. Obviously each individual is different, and there will be plenty of exceptions to the rule.

    This is the same reason that low-income people smoke much more than those who are better off.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Japes wrote: »
    Frankly, anyone who comments to me on the contents of my shopping trolley, for whatever reason, is opening themselves to my frank comments on their inability to mind their own business.
    Amen. The world is too full of people, it seems, who never learned how to mind their own business.

    Miss Amanda, how can you say that????? Graven Image's son was a bit upset, you know, a bit upset. Is this the time for a lesson in good manners?
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