Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson

alienfromzogalienfromzog Shipmate
It has been suggested that a Boris Hell thread is needed; so here goes...

Though, for the life of me, I can't imagine why we're going to need it now the blond, lazy, racist, misogynist, lying arrogant, incompetent has been nominated as Tory leader (and thus our Prime Minister in waiting...

AFZ
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Comments

  • Now he has the blessing of trump to propel him forward, his success is assured. Isn't it?
  • Now he has the blessing of trump to propel him forward, his success is assured. Isn't it?
    Now he has the blessing of trump to propel him forward, his success is assured. Isn't it?

    Nope.

    The UK constitution is an odd thing but basically the Prime Minister has to command the confidence of the Commons. As has been discussed on t'other thread, this is not a given as, even with DUP support, Boris has a working majority of 3, which will probably soon be 1....

    FWIW, whilst it would make me very happy is Corbyn called and won a VONC right now so that Boris doesn't become PM at all, I think it far more likely that he will fall in September....

    We shall see.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    edited July 24
    Now he has the blessing of trump to propel him forward, his success is assured. Isn't it?
    Now he has the blessing of trump to propel him forward, his success is assured. Isn't it?

    Nope.

    The UK constitution is an odd thing but basically the Prime Minister has to command the confidence of the Commons. As has been discussed on t'other thread, this is not a given as, even with DUP support, Boris has a working majority of 3, which will probably soon be 1....

    FWIW, whilst it would make me very happy is Corbyn called and won a VONC right now so that Boris doesn't become PM at all, I think it far more likely that he will fall in September....

    We shall see.

    That confuses his appointment and remaining in office*, in the manner we know, and his success which is what Stercus Tauri was referring to.

    *Not just the UK - it's a feature of parliamentary democracies and quasi democracies.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Now he has the blessing of trump to propel him forward, his success is assured. Isn't it?
    Now he has the blessing of trump to propel him forward, his success is assured. Isn't it?

    Nope.

    The UK constitution is an odd thing but basically the Prime Minister has to command the confidence of the Commons. As has been discussed on t'other thread, this is not a given as, even with DUP support, Boris has a working majority of 3, which will probably soon be 1....

    FWIW, whilst it would make me very happy is Corbyn called and won a VONC right now so that Boris doesn't become PM at all, I think it far more likely that he will fall in September....

    We shall see.

    That confuses his appointment and remaining in office*, in the manner we know, and his success which is what Stercus Tauri was referring to.

    *Not just the UK - it's a feature of parliamentary democracies and quasi democracies.

    What do you mean? I appreciate that I am short cutting a little here. The outgoing Prime Minister advises the Queen on who can command the confidence of the House. It is not clear that Boris does. However, I expect Mrs May to fudge that. But if it was demonstrated that Boris didn't have sufficient support, she wouldn't be able to.

    FWIW, I think he will form a government but he's gonna struggle to keep going for long...

    AFZ
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    1. The outgoing PM does not advise The Queen, they merely recommend that the next be from their own party: it is purely convention that it is the party leader.

    2. Boris does not ask HMQ if he can form a government she asks (or doesn't ask) him to do so.

    Whatever games the Labour Party, SNP or ERG think of playing, they'd be well-advised not to do so: there is no guarantee that any other Conservative, or other party leader, would be any better placed to get through Parliament the necessary legislation either to take the UK out of Europe or to hold another vote. Like it or not, the only way any future government can hope to have a shred of credibility is if they get through legislation to sort out the mess.
  • john holdingjohn holding Ecclesiantics Host, Mystery Worshipper Host
    Anyone, in either House of Parliament or not, can be asked to form a government. The appointment as PM does not rest on having a majority in the House of Commons, at least not at first. A PM can be in power and stay in power until such time as s/he is defeated in the HofC. In past decades that has sometimes meant a government in power for several months before facing a vote of no confidence.

    In the present case, that means Johnson can form a cabinet of ministers who will have full authority upon appointment. He can speak and act on behalf of the UK. Until he meets the HofC and loses a vote of no confidence. Then he probably has to recommend either a replacement PM or an election. If an election, he remains PM and his government remains in power until and unless it loses it s majority in the HofC. And, just for giggles, remember that the Hof C does not have to be called for several months after an election. If an unclear result happens, that could mean Johnson cold choose not to meet the HofC for a good long while, and so avoid facing a vote of No Confidence.
  • Wow. 6 posts and I've already derrailed my own thread... we have hashed this out on the Next PM thread. It was just that I tried to be very precise in the OP...

  • I was trying to be sarcastic. What I meant was that I hope the newly anointed Boris is doomed by the curse of trump.
  • I was trying to be sarcastic. What I meant was that I hope the newly anointed Boris is doomed by the curse of trump.

    D'oh. See it's my fault.
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    He was elected.
    Fair and square.
    By lots and lots of people (didn't just squeak in)
    That should give all you Brits something to think about
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    edited July 24
    I think that the intervening posts have answered largely your query to me. The UK is at best a quasi-democracy, which answers the remainder.
  • 1. The outgoing PM does not advise The Queen, they merely recommend that the next be from their own party: it is purely convention that it is the party leader.

    2. Boris does not ask HMQ if he can form a government she asks (or doesn't ask) him to do so.

    Whatever games the Labour Party, SNP or ERG think of playing, they'd be well-advised not to do so: there is no guarantee that any other Conservative, or other party leader, would be any better placed to get through Parliament the necessary legislation either to take the UK out of Europe or to hold another vote. Like it or not, the only way any future government can hope to have a shred of credibility is if they get through legislation to sort out the mess.

    Trying to stop the blond menace from causing massive damage to the economic and social fabric of the country is not a game. The fact that tories treat politics as a game without real consequences is part of why we're in the mess we're in.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Galilit wrote: »
    He was elected.
    Fair and square.
    By lots and lots of people (didn't just squeak in)
    That should give all you Brits something to think about

    Yes. It tells us that the Conservative Party MPs and membership are not the people we should have deciding our future.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    Galilit wrote: »
    He was elected.
    Fair and square.
    By lots and lots of people (didn't just squeak in)
    That should give all you Brits something to think about
    One hundred and sixty thousand people were able to vote for him. The UK’s population currently sits at 66.87 million. So his electorate was 0.2 per cent of the country (or less than 0.35% of those on the electoral register).

    56 per cent of those 160,000 are over the age of 55, 40% over the age of 65.

    86 per cent of them fall into one of three higher social and economic groups within the country, the ABC1 category.

    They are considerably better-off than most voters – one in 20 put their annual income at over £100,000.

    97 per cent of the party’s members are white – while 70 per cent are men – so ethnic minorities and women remain heavily under-represented in a country where 51 per cent of the population are women, and 14 per cent are from ethnic minorities. (source)

    Of that overly white, overly wealthy, overly male, overly older group 92,153* voted for him. Yes a comfortable majority of his electorate but an unrepresentative less than 0.14% of the population (or less than 0.2% of those on the electoral register).

    (*About the size of the population of Bath or of Hastings.)
  • TinaTina Shipmate
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Galilit wrote: »
    He was elected.
    Fair and square.
    By lots and lots of people (didn't just squeak in)
    That should give all you Brits something to think about

    Yes. It tells us that the Conservative Party MPs and membership are not the people we should have deciding our future.

    92,153 people voted for Boris. UK population is just over 6,000,000. Yup, lots and lots of people all right ...
  • TinaTina Shipmate
    (agreeing with Karl and responding to Gallilit's assertion)
  • RicardusRicardus Shipmate
    Pretty sure Galilit was also being sarcastic ...
  • ThunderBunkThunderBunk Shipmate
    edited July 24
    I am caught up in the general interia which allows these 92,153 gilded people to drag the rest of us to hell, led by a vainglorious, pompous ass.

    Every political system has its dangers, and all are vulnerable to anxious uncertainty. Why this has dragged the UK this far to the right is an interesting question, certainly: my suspicion is that there is something about that kind of thinking which stuns opponents, at least here, or makes its supporters particularly impervious to reason, or both.

    I don't know what is going on, and I'm stunned by it.

    One thing I know, though: as with the Brexit into which this monster is about to lead us, this is very hell and we are in it. Now, this very minute.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    On a BBC post about the lightning in some areas, some comments referred to the Almighty's displeasure at Boris' ascension.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Why this has dragged the UK this far to the right is an interesting question, certainly: my suspicion is that there is something about that kind of thinking which stuns opponents, at least here, or makes its supporters particularly impervious to reason, or both.
    Can you expand this a bit? I may be particularly thick tonight. What do you mean by "stuns opponents"?

    And I do not think the UK is alone here. Granted, you are in a bit of a shit place relative to elsewhere with Brexit, but it does seem a common theme that people can vote against their own interests.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Is Pfeffel really a name?

    🤔🙄😯
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    He is recorded as saying of the Taoiseach Leo Varadkar ‘Why isn’t he called Murphy like the rest of them?’

    So why isn’t he called Arsehole since it’s accurate?
  • chrisstileschrisstiles Shipmate
    It has been suggested that a Boris Hell thread is needed; so here goes...

    Though, for the life of me, I can't imagine why we're going to need it now the blond, lazy, racist, misogynist, lying arrogant, incompetent has been nominated as Tory leader (and thus our Prime Minister in waiting...

    And the truth is that contrary to the protests of many columnists, while he may have been supported by some fairly factional right wing interests, he owes his career to being coddled and protected by the press (presumably because he was chummy with a lot of them).
  • Doc TorDoc Tor Hell Host
    There is one upside to all this, of course. Whoever comes in after Johnson will be hailed as the Messiah.
  • sionisaissionisais Shipmate
    It has been suggested that a Boris Hell thread is needed; so here goes...

    Though, for the life of me, I can't imagine why we're going to need it now the blond, lazy, racist, misogynist, lying arrogant, incompetent has been nominated as Tory leader (and thus our Prime Minister in waiting...

    And the truth is that contrary to the protests of many columnists, while he may have been supported by some fairly factional right wing interests, he owes his career to being coddled and protected by the press (presumably because he was chummy with a lot of them).

    The press (and TV producers) love him becauses he has cabaret value.
  • The UK has been groomed and conditioned by over 2 decades of anti-EU propaganda.

    This website is stunning. You just need to scroll through the index page to grasp the extent to which we have been propaganda-ised.

    And Boris is in large part responsible for starting this.

    There is something very unbecoming of a nation that rewards and essentially talentless dilettante in this way.

    #BorisMustGo
    #BackBorisToBreakRecord

    AFZ
  • Barnabas62Barnabas62 Purgatory Host, Epiphanies Host
    Galilit wrote: »
    He was elected.
    Fair and square.
    By lots and lots of people (didn't just squeak in)
    That should give all you Brits something to think about

    It does. We don't think that the demographics of Tory Party members (who did the voting) are all that encouraging.

    What are those demographics? 97% white, 70% male, average age elderly!

    So that particular subset have managed to convince themselves (by a majority of 2 to 1) that a "lazy, racist, misogynist, lying, arrogant, incompetent" is the right person to lead the UK.

    Might it just be, just possibly be, that the subset needs its collective head examined?

    In the old days of paternalism, the Tory Party grandees would have controlled the selection of the new leader of the Tory Party. But the Tories decided to make the process more open, seemingly more democratic. A popularity poll amongst the party faithful.

    It does seem reasonable to ask if those reforms are a safe way of choosing a party leader of the party in government. Given that the leader will be asked to lead the government of the country. Oh sure, there are theoretical blocking routes. HMQ might not ask him, But that's not going to happen. The Tory Party might not rally around him. But with a few exceptions, that's not going to happen either.

    The US got a dangerous, ignorant, populist, demagogue and now look! We just don't need one of the same over here, thank you very much. And certainly not to determine how we Brexit.
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    edited July 24
    1. The outgoing PM does not advise The Queen, they merely recommend that the next be from their own party: it is purely convention that it is the party leader.

    2. Boris does not ask HMQ if he can form a government she asks (or doesn't ask) him to do so.

    Whatever games the Labour Party, SNP or ERG think of playing, they'd be well-advised not to do so: there is no guarantee that any other Conservative, or other party leader, would be any better placed to get through Parliament the necessary legislation either to take the UK out of Europe or to hold another vote. Like it or not, the only way any future government can hope to have a shred of credibility is if they get through legislation to sort out the mess.

    Trying to stop the blond menace from causing massive damage to the economic and social fabric of the country is not a game. The fact that tories treat politics as a game without real consequences is part of why we're in the mess we're in.

    Actually the real game players in all of the past 2 years of inaction and bickering have been the Labour Party. Labour stood at the 2017 election, under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, on a manifesto that said they stood by the result of the 2016 referendum and therefore would do all they could to help bring it about. After those fine words, they then proceeded to either vacillate (Corbyn and his followers) or give increasingly shrill support to calls for another referendum from those remain supporting people who refused to accept that they had lost the 2016 vote. The behaviour of the LibDems has been no better; Plaid Cymru has, for the most part, kept its head down and while the attitude of the ScotNats might be seen as deplorable from a unionist point of view, it has at least been logical, given the voting pattern in 2016 in Scotland.

    The behaviour of the remain faction has, on the whole, been disgraceful since the day after the 2016 result was announced. Whether or not one voted to remain, it was made absolutely clear before the referendum that the result would be binding on everyone, government and people. The sour grapes exhibited since the referendum has been gobsmacking - such behaviour in a small child would result in being sent to bed with no supper.

    It remains to be seen whether or not those parliamentarians who have heretofore been so ready to see chaos reigning in Whitehall will now have the decency to put the needs of the country before their own political views and prejudices. I won't be holding my breath.
  • This is Hell so...
    Inaccurate assertions
    Misrepresentations
    Strange conclusions
    Illogical reasoning

    Blah blah blah

    There you go, fixed it for you.

    In case, you can't tell, I'm calling your post 100% bullshit.

    AFZ

  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    So typical of a little green man - should the emphasis be on the little?
  • So typical of a little green man - should the emphasis be on the little?

    :lol: if you like?
  • sionisaissionisais Shipmate
    Not sure if this has been mentioned before, but Boris Johnson and Donald Trump were both born in New York!
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited July 24

    It remains to be seen whether or not those parliamentarians who have heretofore been so ready to see chaos reigning in Whitehall will now have the decency to put the needs of the country before their own political views and prejudices. I won't be holding my breath.

    Do you want them to implement the result of the referendum or put the needs of the country first? You can't have both. That's the problem. They know that. That's why it's been a cockup from start to finish which Cameron should never have set in motion.
  • chrisstileschrisstiles Shipmate
    1. The outgoing PM does not advise The Queen, they merely recommend that the next be from their own party: it is purely convention that it is the party leader.

    2. Boris does not ask HMQ if he can form a government she asks (or doesn't ask) him to do so.

    Whatever games the Labour Party, SNP or ERG think of playing, they'd be well-advised not to do so: there is no guarantee that any other Conservative, or other party leader, would be any better placed to get through Parliament the necessary legislation either to take the UK out of Europe or to hold another vote. Like it or not, the only way any future government can hope to have a shred of credibility is if they get through legislation to sort out the mess.

    Trying to stop the blond menace from causing massive damage to the economic and social fabric of the country is not a game. The fact that tories treat politics as a game without real consequences is part of why we're in the mess we're in.

    Actually the real game players in all of the past 2 years of inaction and bickering have been the Labour Party. Labour stood at the 2017 election, under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, on a manifesto that said they stood by the result of the 2016 referendum and therefore would do all they could to help bring it about.

    Based on the government being able to achieve a deal that they assured the public would provide the various benefits that were encapsulated in Labour's Six Tests.
    The behaviour of the remain faction has, on the whole, been disgraceful since the day after the 2016 result was announced. Whether or not one voted to remain, it was made absolutely clear before the referendum that the result would be binding on everyone, government and people.

    Whether you like it or not the losing party is always at liberty to continue their opposition to a particular set of policies after losing - Farage for one was quite vocal about this when the when the boot was on the other foot.

    The closeness of the vote would indicate a softish Brexit path as the most optimal path for a government to follow - May's vote was very far from this. Furthermore, May's deal itself would have passed but for the hard Brexit faction represented by the ERG and her erstwhile allies in the DUP.
  • sionisaissionisais Shipmate
    1. The outgoing PM does not advise The Queen, they merely recommend that the next be from their own party: it is purely convention that it is the party leader.

    2. Boris does not ask HMQ if he can form a government she asks (or doesn't ask) him to do so.

    Whatever games the Labour Party, SNP or ERG think of playing, they'd be well-advised not to do so: there is no guarantee that any other Conservative, or other party leader, would be any better placed to get through Parliament the necessary legislation either to take the UK out of Europe or to hold another vote. Like it or not, the only way any future government can hope to have a shred of credibility is if they get through legislation to sort out the mess.

    Trying to stop the blond menace from causing massive damage to the economic and social fabric of the country is not a game. The fact that tories treat politics as a game without real consequences is part of why we're in the mess we're in.

    Actually the real game players in all of the past 2 years of inaction and bickering have been the Labour Party. Labour stood at the 2017 election, under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, on a manifesto that said they stood by the result of the 2016 referendum and therefore would do all they could to help bring it about. After those fine words, they then proceeded to either vacillate (Corbyn and his followers) or give increasingly shrill support to calls for another referendum from those remain supporting people who refused to accept that they had lost the 2016 vote. The behaviour of the LibDems has been no better; Plaid Cymru has, for the most part, kept its head down and while the attitude of the ScotNats might be seen as deplorable from a unionist point of view, it has at least been logical, given the voting pattern in 2016 in Scotland.

    The behaviour of the remain faction has, on the whole, been disgraceful since the day after the 2016 result was announced. Whether or not one voted to remain, it was made absolutely clear before the referendum that the result would be binding on everyone, government and people. The sour grapes exhibited since the referendum has been gobsmacking - such behaviour in a small child would result in being sent to bed with no supper.

    It remains to be seen whether or not those parliamentarians who have heretofore been so ready to see chaos reigning in Whitehall will now have the decency to put the needs of the country before their own political views and prejudices. I won't be holding my breath.

    What the fuck has this to do with Labour or the Remainers? This Conservative government, with backing from the DUP (spit) has had a working majority and undertook to leave the EU. It failed to do so by the due date. It still has no agreement. The government alone must carry the can.

    You sound like the Daily Mail, without the cogency or literacy.
  • Doc TorDoc Tor Hell Host
    TheOrganist wants to blame the Opposition for failing to vote through government policy.

    The italicised word should give readers an indication as to what's wrong with that.
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    Climacus wrote: »
    On a BBC post about the lightning in some areas, some comments referred to the Almighty's displeasure at Boris' ascension.
    Well, I must say the thought did occur - but only briefly - to me to put in some kind of question here about whether God approves or not, but dismissed it straight away as being extremely unfair. We're all in the same boat on this topic.
  • ThunderBunkThunderBunk Shipmate
    edited July 24
    100 per cent pure unadulterated snowflake bullshit. How dare anyone attempt to hold Brexiteers to account for the impact of their lies?

    ETA I am referring to @TheOrganist 's post
  • SipechSipech Shipmate
    There is something to be said about a weak opposition being a cause that has helped enable the current clusterfuck.

    Conservatives, we have to remember, are The Nasty Party. They don't have the country's best interests at heart. They serve, in order: themselves, their donors, Rupert Murdoch.

    They will get away with what they can, when not held to account by a strong opposition that is a government in waiting. That's pretty much what has happened; only their internal divisions enabled a clutch of sensible Tories (a rare breed) to prevent May's government from getting their plan through parliament.

    Whoever took over after the porcophile waddled off was always going to be supping from a poisoned chalice. That's why Boris 'the Piffle' Johnson dilly-dallied last time round, before hoping that May had drunk most of the poison by now, thus enabling him to fulfil his megalomaniacal fantasy to step in and save the country. Of course, he'll fail. But he's learnt from the orange supremacist that failure is no obstacle to public life, so long as you push through your optimism and lies with the confidence of sociopath after 5 pints.
  • DoublethinkDoublethink Shipmate
    edited July 24
    SusanDoris wrote: »
    Climacus wrote: »
    On a BBC post about the lightning in some areas, some comments referred to the Almighty's displeasure at Boris' ascension.
    Well, I must say the thought did occur - but only briefly - to me to put in some kind of question here about whether God approves or not, but dismissed it straight away as being extremely unfair. We're all in the same boat on this topic.

    Except your are a paying member of the party who trashed this country for a decade and enabled this lying fuckwit to attain power. I’ll be interested in your opinion when you find a principle down the back of the sofa and leave the fucking Tories.
  • The RogueThe Rogue Shipmate
    The behaviour of the remain faction has, on the whole, been disgraceful since the day after the 2016 result was announced. Whether or not one voted to remain, it was made absolutely clear before the referendum that the result would be binding on everyone, government and people. The sour grapes exhibited since the referendum has been gobsmacking - such behaviour in a small child would result in being sent to bed with no supper.

    It was not made clear that the result would be binding on everyone. Nigel Farage himself declared that a vote in favour of remaining by just a few percentage points would not be conclusive.
  • It is comical to see people blaming remain voters and Labour for the Brexit cock-up. Just a small detail that a chunk of the governing party, whose policy Brexit is, voted against May's deal consistently, and really caused her exit. And then the Opposition are blamed!
  • He certainly looks prime ministerial: https://www.moonofalabama.org/2019/05/the-leaden-lady-steps-down.html
    Is this the new way to travel if you're an MP?
    There's also this picture: https://www.buzzfeed.com/sirajdatoo/boris-johnson-has-no-idea-how-to-play-a-guitar
    What song was it? What will he sing with his brother by another mother Donny T?
  • sionisaissionisais Shipmate
    It is comical to see people blaming remain voters and Labour for the Brexit cock-up. Just a small detail that a chunk of the governing party, whose policy Brexit is, voted against May's deal consistently, and really caused her exit. And then the Opposition are blamed!

    I think they know that, but continue to deceive themselves in the hope of garnrring some political advntage. Never forget the power of self-deceit.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    Whether or not one voted to remain, it was made absolutely clear before the referendum that the result would be binding on everyone, government and people.

    I’d have been a great deal less unhappy with, for example, continuing in a customs union, or a Norway style relationship with the EU, both of which appeared to be possible forms of Brexit in the run-up to the referendum. Either of these might also have respected our international obligations under the 1998 Northern Ireland Peace Agreement. I’m not clear on what basis it has been decided that either of these wouldn’t be a fair response to the actual voting in the referendum. But of course we don’t know if any particular version of Brexit would have achieved a majority at all.

    If the nation had been wholly fixed on a hard Brexit, as seems to be the suggestion, then it should have had the wit to return a majority sufficient for Theresa May to obtain that result. The divided state of Parliament reflects the divided state of the nation - there may be a general (52%) wish to be out of Europe, but there’s no general agreement about how that is to be achieved, or even what counts as being kout of Europe’s.
  • EirenistEirenist Shipmate
    My daughter struggles to support herself and her son on her pay from running the cafe in the local Country Park, supplemented by tax credits and housing benefits, which are taken away from her every time she earns slightly more than usual from working extra hours, etc. The resourcesof the bank of Mum and Dad are not limitless, and her ex-husband will not pay more than the minimum towards the maintenance of his son (and, to be fair, he probably cannot afford to do so.) Once we are marooned on Boris Island, with prices rising and the pound sinking rapidly in the west, I do not see how she is going to survive.
  • Doc Tor wrote: »
    There is one upside to all this, of course. Whoever comes in after Johnson will be hailed as the Messiah.

    I'm sure I remember people saying that about May...
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    sionisais wrote: »
    Not sure if this has been mentioned before, but Boris Johnson and Donald Trump were both born in New York!

    So were Bugsy Siegel, Cyndi Lauper, Sean Lennon, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg - what of it? Millions of people have been born in New York.
  • sionisais wrote: »
    It is comical to see people blaming remain voters and Labour for the Brexit cock-up. Just a small detail that a chunk of the governing party, whose policy Brexit is, voted against May's deal consistently, and really caused her exit. And then the Opposition are blamed!

    I think they know that, but continue to deceive themselves in the hope of garnrring some political advntage. Never forget the power of self-deceit.

    Well, the old joke "you won, get over it", has some bite, as some leave voters seem enraged. I suppose it's not so much about winning, as facing the impossibility of enacting Brexit, in the sense of preserving frictionless trade*. Hence, the idea of sacrificing the economy or the union. It seems like a hybrid of the gambler's fallacy and the sunk cost fallacy, we've come so far, we have to go on, fuck the consequences. And there are Traitors about!

    * I think Boris compared this to frictionless re-entry of space vehicles. Err, rly?
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