Grandparenting

124

Comments

  • MarthaMartha Shipmate
    It's lovely how little things like that keep the sense of connection.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I'm just back from a lovely few hours of great-auntie-ing with all three of S's grandchildren.
    :heart: :heart: :heart:
  • Tree BeeTree Bee Shipmate
    DaughterErin, her husband, and 3 week old baby E visited us this morning. I had quite a chat with E, I hope for many more.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Aahh - that's lovely, Tree Bee!
  • Granddaughter (1 in September) and parents, plus Other Grandmother, visited for lunch.

    Said granddaughter has brilliant red hair - I mean, really orange - and she absolutely fell in love with my orang-utan puppet, The Librarian, who is slightly bigger and less orange than she is! there are photos in which the two of them look likes friends 'out on the lash', as my son put it - you know 'you're my best mate!' type photos :heart:

  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    This all sounds lovely; what lucky grandparents you all are.

    Nen - still hopeful...
  • Fingers crossed, Nen! Bear in mind that it's only a few years since Master S was announcing to anyone who would listen that he never wanted to get married or have kids... :lol:
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    Thanks, Mrs S. :smile:
  • Tree BeeTree Bee Shipmate
    Yes, there’s always hope. Daughter Erin will celebrate her 14th wedding anniversary in a couple of months time. We expected her never to have children.
  • Nenya wrote: »
    This all sounds lovely; what lucky grandparents you all are.

    Nen - still hopeful...

    My mother had given up all hope of grandparenthood until the North East Loon was on the way. Given that I was only 29 I'm not sure just why she had assumed it wasn't going to happen, other than that she thought the North East Man and I would rather read than procreate. She also thought my younger brother's hobbies (tinkering with old cars, DIY and golf) were unlikely ways to meet a wife and so he was destined to remain single.

    My brother met his wife at work round about the same time as I became pregnant, and within four years of having given up hope of grandparenthood, she had three grandchildren.
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    I think my parents must have despaired. My brother has never wanted children, and I had Captain Pyjamas at the age of 38. Given what a drama Captain P's arrival was, I'm much too high risk to contemplate having another one which means he's the only grandchild they're going to have, but that seems to be working for everyone. They spoil him like there's no tomorrow :innocent:
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    I'm not sure just why she had assumed it wasn't going to happen, other than that she thought the North East Man and I would rather read than procreate.

    :lol:

    My own mum had a very long wait for grandchildren - my two brothers (10 and 12 years my seniors) always made it clear they weren't going to have children and she was 69 when Nenlet1 came along. She never put any pressure on me about it, or even ever asked questions - just made a delighted fuss about it all when they came. I'm taking a leaf out of her book, but rather hoping I haven't got another nine years to wait... :smile:
  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    I doubt that my son will ever have children so I’m gearing myself up
    to be a great aunt as I have seven nieces. Surely at least one of those will produce a child soon.
    Enjoy the grandchildren they sound fun.
  • Tree BeeTree Bee Shipmate
    My tiny grandson is slightly less tiny! After giving concern about his growth rate a feeding regime was put in place which includes formula and he’s put on a pound in the last week.
  • Mr RoS's birthday today. Elder Son & DiL visited with the three grandkids for socially distanced tea and cake in the garden.

    We haven't seen DiL since early March as she came down with Covid19 in mid-March, and is still suffering recurring symptoms - one of the "long-haul" sufferers.

    Eldest Grandson has been visiting regularly for the past few weeks, to re-establish his pre-lockdown routine (he has autism, so his routines are very important for his well-being), but his brother has been too busy doing Home Schooling (he says). It's his GCE year next year. He has shot up during lockdown. At the beginning of March he and his mother were the same height, now he is a full head taller!

    Granddaughter is a very affectionate and demonstrative child (female autistic), and was desperate to cuddle, but had to make do with cuddling her mother and smiling across the table at us.

    However, in spite of the distancing constraints, it was delightful just to be all together on a sunny summer morning, and pretending everything is 'normal'.

    We still have no idea when we will get to see Younger son and family. Youngest ( so far) grandson is 3, and a new grandbaby is due in October. London might as well be on the moon at the moment.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    There are two new great-nieces or great-nephews in the offing for me this year: my niece is expecting in September, and I heard at the weekend that David's niece is expecting her first in December - first great-grandchild for my m-i-l.
  • How exciting, @Piglet ! Congratulations!
  • BrigidBrigid Shipmate Posts: 1
    I had been the grandmother of two teens until a couple years ago when my daughter found out she was pregnant again - and soon we found out the pregnancy was twins! They are so very fun! Energetic (which helped me as motivation for needed weight loss) little boys. Their older brother and sister watch them every so often, but they refuse to change their messy diapers (understandably, since they are teens), so it can't be for too long :sweat_smile: I absolutely adore them and the teens aren't always so wild about spending much time talking to adults atm, so the lil ones keep me busy.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    Brigid, how wonderful!!!
  • PuzzlerPuzzler Shipmate
    My teenage grandchildren are all away on holiday, one lot in the Yorkshire dales, one lot returning from France today. I am longing to hear all about their time in the Alps but daren’t risk seeing them for a while in case of infection.
  • Just in case you all get too envious of my childminding activities, let me tell you that last time, Apprentice Grandson a) climbed over the sofa and turned off the telly during PE with Joe (meaning that No 1 Grandson was deprived of some much needed exercise; b) utterly refused to go down for his morning nap, rendering him Baby Grumpkin for the morning and depriving No 1 Grandson of the hour or so 1-1 attention he would usually get; and 3) produced 3 dirty nappies during the course of my shift :grimace:

    Then, while he was finally consigned to his cot for his lunchtime nap and the adults were snarfing down their lunch in the kitchen, No 1 Grandson came and asked for help. We'd assumed he was playing with his Lego, but he was doing spontaneous Learning Time, making letters with his train track (!).

    'I've made a l and an o and a curly c, but I don't know how to make a kicking k' he said.

    Turns out he was trying to write 'lockdown'.

    He's 4 and a half. How sad is that? :cry:
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Wow. :open_mouth:
  • W HyattW Hyatt Shipmate
    Turns out he was trying to write 'lockdown'.

    He's 4 and a half. How sad is that? :cry:

    Sad, yes, but really impressive for 4 and a half!
  • Yes, I thought that was pretty impressive, too! Also that he had not got the sulks over Baby Grumpkin.

  • 'I've made a l and an o and a curly c, but I don't know how to make a kicking k' he said.

    I reckon he'd need two sets of points(one left handed, one right) to do a 'k', and depending on the type of trainset maybe a gender-changer to join them up. Quite an educational experience, right there :smile:
  • m-i-m, that's what I used!

    Baby Grumpkin (TIG #2) has been very much more cheery recently. His Little Welsh Cousin, at a month younger, has taken to walking as a duck to water, waving her arms above her head for balance. But TIG #2's preference is for climbing - he is so fast on hands and knees that he doesn't feel the need to walk, so his party trick is to get on to the Lego chest (fastened with cable ties) and then to the bench behind the sofa, roly poly over the back of the sofa to get to the seat and hence to the little table where the remotes are kept (see above!). Alternatively to get on to the first bookshelf and use his elbow on the big loudspeaker to lever himself towards the second shelf. But my absolute favourite is that he will take the top turret off the wooden castle and put it on one of the lower levels to give himself an extra step towards the summit! (as his Mum says, he's like the raptors on Jurassic World - more intelligent than he looks...)

    LWC can say choo-choo and wow-wow, but TIG #2 is more the strong silent type :heart:
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    edited September 5
    Our little munchkin is nine months old and confidently walking round the furniture. Her Dad walked at 11 months so I predict the same!

    He said ‘she never stops’ 🤣 she takes after him. 🤣
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    I remember my mother saying of my youngest brother (who would fearlessly climb any where) "I hope he has a son whose antics worry him as much as his worry me," - he didn't.
  • New baby grandson is nearly 4 months old and is now weighing 10lbs. Small but perfectly formed.
  • Huia wrote: »
    I remember my mother saying of my youngest brother (who would fearlessly climb any where) "I hope he has a son whose antics worry him as much as his worry me," - he didn't.

    My mum was quietly pleased when my niece took to sneaking into my sister's bed during the night. It was just the same trick my sister had pulled on Mum.

  • Our six year old grandson likes birds, so I e-mailed a rather fuzzy photo I took in poor light a few days ago of an enormous bird sitting in a tree, over a hundred feet behind the house. Our daughter reported that it took him 1.5 seconds, approximately, to announce, "That's a juvenile bald eagle". Checked with Auntie Google, and he was dead right. At that age I might have been able to identify a cow, but only because they lived on the other side of the back fence.
  • News from the Eyes in the Back of Your Head department (not for the squeamish!)

    Here's the scenario.

    You are on your knees on the floor of a living room (not yours) with a year-old baby supine but wriggling on a changing mat. Her father, a fairly senior civil servant, is on a conference call in another room, as is her mother (slightly less senior, but having a really difficult day) in a third. You remove the baby's pull-up (an experiment, as she so hates having her nappy changed) and a medium-sized item falls from it. You pin the baby down with your left hand and confidently put out your right hand for the baby wipes, only to remember that 'borrowed' them to clean her face after lunch and left them in the kitchen.

    Do you -

    1) yell for help

    2) grab a cotton wool pad and seize the offending item, placing it in the pull-up; then take the baby's drinking cup and sprinkle further cotton pads with its contents, to clean the baby's rear end; replace the pull-up before further tragedies can occur; and finally repeat with more cotton wool, to clean the baby's feet, which have somehow become involved in all the excitement. Ram everything disposable into a nappy bag, wash hands even more thoroughly than usual, put baby's cup into the dishwasher. Remember to breathe.

    Answers on a postcard...
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    *tries to stop laughing and fails

    The second option. While maintaining the air of being totally in control of the situation.

    The feet being involved with the contents of the nappy. I confess I'd forgotten that particular aspect of baby-changing.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    My granddaughter has been held over the loo for poos since she was five months old. Zero pooey nappies since then. Why didn’t I think of that when mine were babies?

    🤔
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    Ah, potty training! Does that become a discussion again once you're a grandparent? :wink: It was my mum's proud boast that my two brothers and I were all "clean and dry at a year." All I can say is, we must have had the potty permanently strapped to our backsides. :lol: I suspect it was something of a trauma because I can remember having to sit on the potty until I performed, and crying because I couldn't. And if what she said is true I was under a year old.

    I'm over it now, of course. Clearly. :flushed:
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    edited September 8
    In this case it’s not potty training - it’s just pooey nappy limitation. Mostly to save the cost.

    I’m sure potty training will happen in due course. My niece had twins, so left potty training until very late. Then it was done and dusted in four days!

    💩
  • Boogie wrote: »
    My granddaughter has been held over the loo for poos since she was five months old. Zero pooey nappies since then. Why didn’t I think of that when mine were babies?

    If you've got one baby, and are hanging out at home within easy dashing distance of a toilet, you can do this. If you've got older kids and are bringing the baby along with you while you're shopping, doing things with your older kids, etc., then it's a lot harder to manage.

    I don't really see how it saves on cost, though - my memory of my kids at even that age is that the majority of nappy changes were just wet, rather than pooey.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Nappies these days hold tons of wee without ever feeling wet - and they are super slim too. Very impressive.
  • How do you know when they might want a poo? I know all mine save them for me, but otherwise?
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    edited September 8
    She lets them know, she has a little sound she makes. 🙂

    (A bit like my puppy does! 🤣🤣)
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    It's conversations like this that make me glad we never had kids!

    However, all three of my nieces* are currently pregnant, so quite a lot of excitement in the Piglet clan!
    :heart: :heart: :heart:

    * well, technically two who are mine and one who's David's (he'd have been so excited). :cry:
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    ((Hugs)) @Piglet

    Conversations like this also make me glad ours are grown up and they are not our decisions to make. We just have the fun!
  • @Piglet , I'm sorry - I'd forgotten that the hosts also have to visit these threads and thought that anyone looking on a Grandparenting thread might know what to expect :blush:
  • Boogie wrote: »
    She lets them know, she has a little sound she makes. 🙂

    The challenge is that the time between the "little sound" and the action is quite short, so you need to be within easy dashing distance...
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    edited September 9
    Boogie wrote: »
    She lets them know, she has a little sound she makes. 🙂

    The challenge is that the time between the "little sound" and the action is quite short, so you need to be within easy dashing distance...

    Oh yes. I’ve never tried it, just witnessed it.

    We are babysitting for a month in June as Mum will be back at work and Dad is going on a cycling adventure in Norway. (He will be on parental leave all year - Mum’s year finishes in February). I forgive him his adventure as he’s a great Dad, and we will enjoy babysitting. But we will have to learn the poo protocol - eek!

    💩

  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Boogie wrote: »
    ... we will have to learn the poo protocol ...
    I can't help thinking that The Poo Protocol ought to be a book by Frederick Forsyth ...

    I'll see myself out. :mrgreen:
  • Nenya wrote: »
    Ah, potty training!
    What has been described in most of the above posts is 'parent training'. The infant is just doing what it needs to do, when it needs to do it. Its the parent that is learning, and responding to, whatever tiny pre-poo signal the child makes.

    Once the child has control of the appropriate muscles, and has the vocabulary to indicate it's need, then potty training is usually easy. I hope your grandchild, Boogie, has developed those skills by June.

    I have noticed that many children are in nappies for much longer than mine were (40+ years ago). I put that down to the very qualities of disposable nappies that Boogie is lauding. The child never feels uncomfortably wet, and doesn't associate wee-ing with being wet, so has no need to avoid the situation by using the potty or loo.

  • I used to be admin on a cloth nappy forum and most people there thought the same; that children in disposables stay in nappies to a higher age because they don’t feel wet when they wee. But I suppose you could argue that it should be more of an unpleasant shock for them when they have the disposable nappies removed.
    I think babies are in nappies longer because both parents are usually working and potty training is labour intensive and stressful. It seems to me that many children are potty trained at nursery or the childminders. Also, most government nursery places start at 3 years so there is a intensive rush of training age 2 1/2.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    My niece’s twelve month old baby is in cloth nappies. Very environmentally friendly, but huge compared to disposables, she has a wide-legged walk!
  • I have noticed that many children are in nappies for much longer than mine were (40+ years ago). I put that down to the very qualities of disposable nappies that Boogie is lauding. The child never feels uncomfortably wet, and doesn't associate wee-ing with being wet, so has no need to avoid the situation by using the potty or loo.

    I think this is true. I think it's also true that modern disposables are easy for parents, compared to the terry squares of yore, which means that "accidents" are much more marginal effort for parents now than they were then.

    @Heavenlyannie points out that it is difficult for working parents to find the time to work consistently on potty training. I'll add to that that older children train faster. You can, with effort, train a fairly young child, or you can wait a year, and it'll be much easier.

    Apart from the fact that preschools generally don't want to take children in nappies, I don't think there are long-term consequences of keeping children in nappies longer.
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