Proof Americans and Brits speak a different language

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  • Stove and oven are interchangeable where I live. The word cooker is never used.
  • rhubarb wrote: »
    Stove and oven are interchangeable where I live. The word cooker is never used.
    Not quite interchangeable where I live, in that the oven is a specific part of the stove. One cooks food on the stove, but in the oven.

  • mousethief wrote: »
    Zacchaeus wrote: »
    Gramps49 wrote: »
    A "stove" burns things. Funny. Nearly every American calls the appliance upon which we cook our meals a stove. Once in a while, the term "range" is used.

    We call our cooker a stove - I believe that Stove was an original make of cooker

    Not so.

    it was in the uk though

    https://www.stoves.co.uk/
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    Zacchaeus wrote: »
    Gramps49 wrote: »
    A "stove" burns things. Funny. Nearly every American calls the appliance upon which we cook our meals a stove. Once in a while, the term "range" is used.

    We call our cooker a stove - I believe that Stove was an original make of cooker

    Not so.

    Tangent: Thanks for sharing the etymology dictionary, mt. It was love at first sight!
  • Zacchaeus wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    Zacchaeus wrote: »
    Gramps49 wrote: »
    A "stove" burns things. Funny. Nearly every American calls the appliance upon which we cook our meals a stove. Once in a while, the term "range" is used.

    We call our cooker a stove - I believe that Stove was an original make of cooker

    Not so.

    it was in the uk though

    https://www.stoves.co.uk/

    It was a brand name, but that the brand was named after the item, rather than the other way round, was I think MT's point.
  • Gramps49 wrote: »
    I tried to find out why a cooking stove is sometimes called a range. In so doing I came across this list of the top ten words of the year that Americans had to look up.
    How we use the words in western Canada.

    The range is the top of the stove where you put things in pots and pans and heat them from beneath. A range top is installed into a counter (or counter top) with no oven underneath. I believe a skillet is a frying pan. Not sure.

    The oven is the heated part with a door that you open and put in things you want to bake.

    The whole appliance is a stove. They are almost all electric these days, mainly because, I think, electricity is cheaper than natural gas. I have a convection oven which is also steam injectable. I bake using cup, teaspoon and other measures. When I bake bread, I weigh the amounts of dough in grams if I need uniform size loaves. 680g is a 1½ lb loaf.
  • Kittyville wrote: »
    I'm tempted to ask what it tells us about a nation whose outstanding cultural icons consist purely of an animated health warning, Barrie Humphreys, R*lf H*rr*s, one hit wonders Men at Work (cracking hit though), Sidney Nolan and the late and very much lamented Clive James ...

    But I hope to return to Australia for my first visit since 1966 sometime in 2020 and want to ensure I receive a cordial welcome.

    Good to see it’s not just pond wars you try to start.

    I do my best to be equitable ...

    ;)

    If I do get to go I would very much look forward to revisiting and getting to know the place for the first time ...
  • KarlLB wrote: »
    It was a brand name, but that the brand was named after the item, rather than the other way round, was I think MT's point.

    Cheers.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    rhubarb wrote: »
    Stove and oven are interchangeable where I live. The word cooker is never used.
    Not quite interchangeable where I live, in that the oven is a specific part of the stove. One cooks food on the stove, but in the oven.

    Basically the same here. But there are slow cookers.
  • Crock pots.
  • I believe "Crock Pot" is a brand name for a slow cooker, which has come to be used generically.

    A "crack pot," however, is something totally different. :wink:
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Crock Pot is a brand name, which is why I used the generic slow cooker.

    A tangent. A friend talked about cooking a terrine in a large oval slow cooker. Make your mix as usual and put into a heatproof dish that will fit into the cooker. Some water to come halfway up, just as you'd do in an oven, and turn it onto low heat. Leave 6 to 8 hours. Saves using an oven in hot weather.
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    NpNp: "They are almost all electric these days, mainly because, I think, electricity is cheaper than natural gas."

    Perhaps in Canada, but in SoCal I do much better with a natural gas stove and heating systems than my friends do with all-electric homes.
  • It is so much easier, for me at least, to cook on a gas stovetop.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    We have a gas stovetop and electric ovens. The stovetop is easier to control than an electric one - you get an instant response to raising or lowering the heat. Given the solar panels on our roof, it makes sense to use electricity for the ovens where there is not the same need for an instant response.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    We have a gas stovetop and electric ovens. The stovetop is easier to control than an electric one - you get an instant response to raising or lowering the heat. Given the solar panels on our roof, it makes sense to use electricity for the ovens where there is not the same need for an instant response.

    Same here. My wife grew up using gas and never liked electric stoves, so when we bought our current house we installed a gas stovetop, but the space for an oven was too small for a gas oven, and we had to opt for an electric oven.
  • That's the best combination in my opinion.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    'Stovetop'? What about 'hob'? They are perpendicularly adjacent in my kitchen, but are in fact different appliances. The hob is gas, the grill/oven and (fan) oven electric.

    A range would be something which combined the two, and be powered by either electricity, gas or solid fuel.
  • Never heard "hob" in the states. As far as I know it's strictly a British thing.
  • Where I live we all know what a hob is - its a male ferret.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    We have a gas stovetop and electric ovens. The stovetop is easier to control than an electric one - you get an instant response to raising or lowering the heat. Given the solar panels on our roof, it makes sense to use electricity for the ovens where there is not the same need for an instant response.

    We have solar panels too and use a totally electric cooker that does offer instant control on the stovetop and also much easier to keep clean than gas burners as it's a totally flat surface. It's called an induction cooker. Are these not popular in the USA? The only downside is you need particular types of pans so we needed to replace some of ours when we got it. I wouldn't want to cook on anything else now!
  • edited December 2019
    Natural gas is used here for home heating and water heating. Far cheaper than heating with electric. In locations like our's with very cold winters it's far cheaper to heat with gas (-32°C today). Where natural gas lines run it is required to use it, and illegal to use oil. Rural gassification brought it everywhere in this Siberian part of Canada. We've one government run natural gas utility, no private companies are interested in gas, electric, internet, cable TV, phones, water provision except in lucrative city markets so they're not allowed. We're also required have very well insulated houses. Furnaces are very efficient also.

    I haven't seen the numbers for a while but if memory serves the efficiency of modern electric stoves is very high- convection oven, induction burners.
  • Where I live we all know what a hob is - its a male ferret.

    :lol:
  • Minus 32 degrees Celsius!

    I can't even begin to imagine that.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Gracious Rebel - no idea about the availability of induction stove tops in the US. They are readily available here but friends who have them advised against them (they bought having succumbed to advertising material).
  • I have an induction stove and love it. It is second one as we moved. They are readily available in US. I love the easy clean up and find it simple to use after a few days.
  • I have an induction stove and love it. It is second one as we moved. They are readily available in US. I love the easy clean up and find it simple to use after a few days.

    It's a bugger for erroring whenever you spill water over the controls, which I do a lot.
  • edited December 2019
    Bad design puts controls at the front of the range. The idea was to set up a barrier at the front. I like the controls where spillage isn't a problem.
    Minus 32 degrees Celsius!

    I can't even begin to imagine that.

    -32°C is cold but not bad. There's a line at about -40 where it really stings to touch things metal. It is usually still, no wind, and moisture in the air begins to crystallize in the sunshine. At night many stars and the northern lights. Humans adapt to any thing. You have to shift bicycle gears slowly. Things behave differently. Cars get plugged in: electric heater for the engine block. Booster cables ubiquitous for helping frozen car people. Such things put everyone on first names and break down barriers between people from all walks and stations in life. Cold weather is probably the biggest influence on culture and being informal with each other here.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Hell Host, 8th Day Host
    mousethief wrote: »
    That's the best combination in my opinion.
    It's the one preferred by Julia Child. I find that even I prefer it, and I'm no Julia Child.

  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Rossweisse wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    That's the best combination in my opinion.
    It's the one preferred by Julia Child. I find that even I prefer it, and I'm no Julia Child.

    Are you a Beck or Bertholle?
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    edited December 2019
    "Hob" also means hobgoblin.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    "Hob" also means hobgoblin.

    Best ale on earth!
    :smile:
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Gee D wrote: »
    Gracious Rebel - no idea about the availability of induction stove tops in the US. They are readily available here but friends who have them advised against them (they bought having succumbed to advertising material).

    Stayed in a holiday let in Scotland once which had one - but no instructions. I worked out how to switch it on, but then it would just flash 'F' endlessly. I could indeed think of a word beginning in F but that seemed not to help. Eventually a helpful neighbour decoded it as 'Ferrous'. However, none of the pots and pans were accepted as such - bar one Le Creuset oven dish.

    OTOH, a gîte we took in France had one which was a) simpler and b) came with the proper cookware.

    But nevertheless, in the absence of a gas hob, I'd rather cook over an open fire tbh.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Cooking over an open fire is great (I'm going to this evening) but you need an alternative, at least here. We've had many days recently with a total fire ban, and that includes bbq fires, fuel stoves etc. Even a gas bbq can only be used with great precautions.
  • Sometimes, US ovens are built into a wall. You don't have to bend over to use them, 'cause they're roughly at chest height. Very nice.
  • We don't say hob or stove top, but rather the common term here is hotplates.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    That brings to mind a whole bygone era (possibly the 60s) of hotplates, hostess trolleys and fondues.

    We had a cookbook once in which all the recipes were food you cooked at table (probably in a cocktail dress and bouffant hairstyle). There was a lot of flambéeing involved as I recall.
  • hostess trolleys

    Had to look this one up. I guess you mean a buffet cart--some of them have warming elements.
  • Firenze wrote: »
    That brings to mind a whole bygone era (possibly the 60s) of hotplates, hostess trolleys and fondues.

    We had a cookbook once in which all the recipes were food you cooked at table (probably in a cocktail dress and bouffant hairstyle). There was a lot of flambéeing involved as I recall.
    Please don't forget your pearl necklace.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Yes (though I had to look up buffet cart). Although in UK usage a hostess trolley would be strictly for domestic rather than commercial use.

    Incidentally ‘cart’ is another difference in usage. In the UK a cart would be something large of the kind that you should remember to put behind rather than before the horse. (Even the traditional means of getting to hell -the handcart - tends to be a larger outdoor item.)

    Smaller things for your shopping, desserts in a restaurant, golf clubs*, sacks etc. tend to be trolleys.

    (*Unless it is big enough to ride on in which case it is a buggy.)
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    I was thinking about 'buggy' the other day, and how it has morphed from small horse-drawn vehicle* to being either beach, golf or baby - with, I think, the last usage becoming dominant.

    Which also made me think of the demise of prams.

    *though I think in Ireland/Britain it would have been a trap. But there's a whole vehicle vocabulary that has disappeared. Who now would be impressed by a barouche-landau?
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    You show me yours… :wink:




  • Firenze wrote: »
    I was thinking about 'buggy' the other day, and how it has morphed from small horse-drawn vehicle* to being either beach, golf or baby - with, I think, the last usage becoming dominant.

    Which also made me think of the demise of prams.

    *though I think in Ireland/Britain it would have been a trap. But there's a whole vehicle vocabulary that has disappeared. Who now would be impressed by a barouche-landau?

    Speaking of disappearing language. In some parts of Ireland they have jarveys. And across Britain dog-cart was used a lot. You still get a few Brougham Streets here and there, too!
  • Pull cart for golf clubs. You walk and pull by a handle.

    A hotplate is a small plug in appliance with 2 electric burners.

    "Let" isn't a noun. We're more specific with what's being rented: rental cabin, renting a condo. Cabins are never cottages in western Canada and are universally beside a lake or in a wilderness area. Condos are units owned in a multiunit building. "We rented a condo to go skiing in the mountains." is a typical way of saying things.

    We say "zoning permission" in place of "planning permission". Mostly you cannot legally rent a cabin or condo out as owners because zoning will say it's not a commercial development. Thus people rent out illegal rentals.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Golden Key wrote: »
    Sometimes, US ovens are built into a wall. You don't have to bend over to use them, 'cause they're roughly at chest height. Very nice.

    That was very fashionable here from the early-60's to mid-80's. The Sydney part of the movement started with the now-defunct building firm of Pettit and Sevitt, well known as a major contributor to the expansion of the suburb of St Ives. The houses were well designed and well built.
  • Something I hate is "new build" rather than "new building". My hatred is influenced by the first person I heard using the phrase, who was a hypocritical bully. Yes, I'm that shallow.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Hell Host, 8th Day Host
    Gee D wrote: »
    Rossweisse wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    That's the best combination in my opinion.
    It's the one preferred by Julia Child. I find that even I prefer it, and I'm no Julia Child.

    Are you a Beck or Bertholle?
    Alas, no. But I was a pretty good cook when motivated and when I had the time.
    Golden Key wrote: »
    Sometimes, US ovens are built into a wall. You don't have to bend over to use them, 'cause they're roughly at chest height. Very nice.
    Yes, they are, but they're pretty hard to find, compared to an ordinary oven/range. (I replaced mine a few months ago, so I know whereof I write.)

  • Firenze wrote: »
    Who now would be impressed by a barouche-landau?
    Most people because there's no such thing!

    A barouche only has a hood - usually collapsible - over the rear part because the coachman's seat is at the front end. A barouche was the model for the earliest types of perambulator.

    A landau has passenger seats at either end, a separate seat for the coachman on the exterior of the front end of the carriage, and collapsible hoods over front and rear. When HMQ attends Royal Ascot she and the rest of her party drive down the course in a series of landaus.
  • From PublicationCoach.com
    A barouche-landau is mentioned in Jane Austen’s 1816 novel Emma, as something combining “the best features of a barouche and a landau.”

    The vehicle was fashionable throughout the 19th century. It provides seats for four passengers, two of them sitting behind the coachman’s high box-seat. A leather roof can be raised to give back-seat passengers some protection from the weather.

  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Apparently a barouche landau is a thing. A little internet searching throws up the fact that it is described in Jane Austen’s Emma (1816) as something combining “the best features of a barouche and a landau.”
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