Proof Americans and Brits speak a different language

1373840424385

Comments

  • LC's pronunciation is the one I know. Growing up elsewhere, I think it was called just "chili" (CHILL-ee).
  • Sure. But when the people I grew up with in Southern California ordered chili con carne, that's the way they said it: "Chillay cone carnay." I expect it comes of being closer to the border, but nobody ever said con in a way that made it rhyme with John or Don. It was "cone", or people would figure you were from out of state.

    I am from out of state.
  • I've actually decided that it's interesting that we're generically comparing Brits and Americans here. There are plenty of both countries that I simply cannot understand, but both have core areas of dialects that are quite clear. I defy you to compare the incomprehensibility of a Cumbrian accent with one from Georgia, a Yorkshire one versus Alabama. And up here there's Newfoundland, where the dialect also gets a bit hard to understand. The "English" language is very diverse.

    And yet mutually understandable as a written language. Which is why the idea of spelling based on pronunciation is madness.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Sure. But when the people I grew up with in Southern California ordered chili con carne, that's the way they said it: "Chillay cone carnay." I expect it comes of being closer to the border, but nobody ever said con in a way that made it rhyme with John or Don. It was "cone", or people would figure you were from out of state.

    I am from out of state.

    Yep. Though if I were up there, it would be me saying it funny, and I would be the one out of state.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Sure. But when the people I grew up with in Southern California ordered chili con carne, that's the way they said it: "Chillay cone carnay." I expect it comes of being closer to the border, but nobody ever said con in a way that made it rhyme with John or Don. It was "cone", or people would figure you were from out of state.

    I am from out of state.

    Yep. Though if I were up there, it would be me saying it funny, and I would be the one out of state.

    At least some people here would recognize the Spanish pronunciation and assume you spoke Spanish (or were being pretentious).
  • PhilipVPhilipV Shipmate
    Americans don't value the public sector and don't understand non-commercial public service. Example: Meghan Markle's disdain for her new role as one of the top public servants in the UK. This is demonstrated in her dilemma: How can I make money out of this resource that I have cleverly engineered using my entrepreneurial opportunities (ie getting married) so that I can take personal advantage and live my American dream birthright of selfrealisation?
  • Wow. That’s a pretty massive, and fairly offensive, generalization.

  • RuthRuth Admin Emeritus
    Over 300 million of us, all misunderstanding the same thing in the same way. It's kind of impressive that in this highly polarized age we've achieved agreement in this one area.
  • And I said, what about
    Breakfast at Tiffany's?
    She said, I think I
    Remember the film.
    As I recall, we said,
    We both kind of liked it--
    And I said, Well,
    That's one thing we've got.
  • How the hell does Markle Sparkle find her august presence in this thread? Off with his head!
  • And I said, what about
    Breakfast at Tiffany's?
    She said, I think I
    Remember the film.
    As I recall, we said,
    We both kind of liked it--
    And I said, Well,
    That's one thing we've got.
    :lol:
  • Gee D wrote: »

    But how many times does someone here have to say that it is a standard practice before posts such as yours And Golden Key's (not picking on you, but these are the 2 most recent} accept that is is accepted here and works well?

    Indeed. If I were in your beautiful country and enjoying a 'do' I would happily accept the custom, in the same way I would, say, remove my shoes in a Japanese restaurant, or observe any etiquette prevailing in the place I'm eating in! Hence, 'cultural expectations'.

    Is it true that some cultures deliberately belch loudly to express satisfaction for their food? Now, I really would struggle with that?!

  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Anselmina wrote: »
    Is it true that some cultures deliberately belch loudly to express satisfaction for their food? Now, I really would struggle with that?!

    When I was growing up 60 and more years ago, we were told that that was the custom in China, to show that you'd been fed very amply indeed. No idea how true it was then, but on none of the rare and venturesome occasions we visited a Chinese restaurant did we notice it.

    Thanks for the rest of your post.
  • And I said, what about
    Breakfast at Tiffany's?
    She said, I think I
    Remember the film.
    As I recall, we said,
    We both kind of liked it--
    And I said, Well,
    That's one thing we've got.

    Now I'm going to have that song stuck in my head all day long. Jerk.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Anselmina wrote: »
    Is it true that some cultures deliberately belch loudly to express satisfaction for their food? Now, I really would struggle with that?!

    When I was growing up 60 and more years ago, we were told that that was the custom in China, to show that you'd been fed very amply indeed. No idea how true it was then, but on none of the rare and venturesome occasions we visited a Chinese restaurant did we notice it.

    Thanks for the rest of your post.

    When I was growing up (same time frame), we were told it was the custom in Middle Eastern countries. :confused:

  • LeafLeaf Shipmate
    Re the chili discussion: I understand that a colloquial name for chili con carne in Texas is "a bowl of red", which always reminds me of Esau in Genesis 25:30 demanding a "bowl of red" (lentil stew, but still.)
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    @PhilipV , that sweeping generalization is offensive and is entirely inappropriate for Heaven.

    Trudy, Heavenly Host
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »

    When I was growing up (same time frame), we were told it was the custom in Middle Eastern countries. :confused:

    I wonder if it were ever true of some place?

    On the chilli line, the usual pronunciation here is along the lines of chilly. conn (to rhyme with Don or John) karnay. Probably not authentic, but waiters etc would know what you were talking about - and that's what matters.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited January 13
    British English speakers seem to have trouble with distinguishing -ay from -ee endings in words like this, so carnee is quite common. I put this down to spelling; the end result of the GVS is that "long e" is almost always "ee" rather than the long e of most other languages using the Latin alphabet, while we do have words where an I carries the "ee" sound.

    Most UK speakers pronounce the South American country and the spicy vegetable the same way.
  • MMMMMM Shipmate
    Gee D, that’s how I hear it pronounced here (Southern England), and how I would expect the Spanish to be pronounced (‘con’ pronounced ‘cone’ sounds really odd to me). It’s a while since I learnt Spanish, but still.

    I suspect it’s just a matter of different accents. On a recent holiday, I found the accent in Chile really difficult to understand but haven’t had the same difficulties in Argentina or Peru (I’m not pretending my Spanish is that good - perhaps it’s more accurate to say that I found the accent in Chile presented another layer of difficulty).

    MMM
  • Just back from a trip across the US border, mainly to see our granddaughter in a school performance of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night that had been partly, but not completely, bowdlerised. After the play her younger brother was falling about himself laughing at the fact that they had used the word 'ass' several times. It was my happy privilege to explain to him that it was simply another word for 'donkey', and that he should feel free to use it whenever he needed to. Our daughter was glad to see us leave.
  • Perhaps she was afraid that you’d let grandson know that tomorrow is the Feast of the Ass. :wink:

  • orfeoorfeo Shipmate
    Hmm. In my Australian experience, "chill con carne" does not end with any kind of vowel sound whatsoever.
  • orfeoorfeo Shipmate
    By the way, does anyone else listen to the language-themed podcast The Allusionist? Both interesting and very fun.

    The episode about the very different use of the word "please" in the UK and USA is particularly apt for this thred.
  • orfeo wrote: »
    By the way, does anyone else listen to the language-themed podcast The Allusionist? Both interesting and very fun.

    The episode about the very different use of the word "please" in the UK and USA is particularly apt for this thred.

    Number?
  • Never mind, found it.
  • orfeoorfeo Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    orfeo wrote: »
    By the way, does anyone else listen to the language-themed podcast The Allusionist? Both interesting and very fun.

    The episode about the very different use of the word "please" in the UK and USA is particularly apt for this thred.

    Number?

    It's episode 33, and it is just called "Please".
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    BroJames wrote: »
    Time they switched to LEDs. Save on energy cost of lighting, save on air conditioning.

    LED's give off 87.2 degrees F, or 30.6667 C, They do use LED's--actually required, but when you have thousands of them in a building the building stays quite hot.
  • Is "woke" an Americanism? It's an expression I've only recently come across, and it always seems to be used in a pejorative sense: "That program's so woke it's lost all it's viewers".
  • I only see it on the internet, but it wouldn't surprise me. IMHO "woke" in the non-pejorative sense came first, but it sounds so smug that most people hesitate to use it of anything/one they like.
  • One of the problems with "woke" is that you could never actually claim it for yourself. You can say "I am a feminist" and that (should) mean you favor certain policies and believe certain things. If you say "I am woke" it is just bragging.
  • And then there's "virtue-signaling". New-ish to me; but it seems to be purely an insult.
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    This is from the urbandictionary.com
    The act of being very pretentious about how much you care about a social issue.

    Yeah, most people don't care about parking spaces for families with disabled pets. I wish they were woke like me.
  • orfeoorfeo Shipmate
    Urban dictionary is not exactly the most reliable source for... well for just about anything.
  • EirenistEirenist Shipmate
    'Emotionalsupport animals' - the very concept leaves Brits wondering if they live on the same planet as Americans.
  • orfeoorfeo Shipmate
    Eirenist wrote: »
    'Emotionalsupport animals' - the very concept leaves Brits wondering if they live on the same planet as Americans.

    The equivalent would be "stiff upper lip animals".
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    I think the equivalent in our house for our late cat was 'scroggle fodder'.

    Scroggle v. to tickle a cat until it either purrs or bites you
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    edited January 27
    orfeo wrote: »
    Urban dictionary is not exactly the most reliable source for... well for just about anything.

    Never claimed it was, I was just giving an example of how it "woke" used. But it has been used in American courts to understand what a slang word may mean and the Department of Motor Vehicles of various states will use it to screen out certain words on vanity plates. It is probably no more reliable than Wikipedia since it is open-sourced and edited by volunteers. It is definitely more current than many recognized dictionaries.
  • I sometimes use Urban Dictionary if a search engine gives me a link there. I rarely go directly there, because of bad experiences with particular words there. UD definitions can be...crude...in the sexual sense. Disturbing, especially if you're not expecting that.

    It *is* crowd-sourced; but AIUI: unlike Wikipedia, members submit possible definition entries, and their community votes on them. So UD pages may not get the periodic revisions and adjustments that W sites get.

    But I've found some worthwhile definitions at UD with a search engine. I can get a hint of the results before I go to UD, and go elsewhere if necessary.
  • orfeoorfeo Shipmate
    Gramps49 wrote: »
    orfeo wrote: »
    Urban dictionary is not exactly the most reliable source for... well for just about anything.

    Never claimed it was, I was just giving an example of how it "woke" used. But it has been used in American courts to understand what a slang word may mean and the Department of Motor Vehicles of various states will use it to screen out certain words on vanity plates. It is probably no more reliable than Wikipedia since it is open-sourced and edited by volunteers. It is definitely more current than many recognized dictionaries.

    It is actually a lot less reliable than Wikipedia. Many of the example sentences that get submitted are frankly terrible.
  • An odd usage I noticed in some of the opening arguments in the impeachment trial: some speakers said dates in an unusual way. Americans will usually add "-rd", "-st-", or "-th" to the end of the day number. E.g. "March 29" is said as "March 29th".

    But some of the speakers left off the endings, and just said the number only. E.g. said "March 29". To me, it sounded weird and a bit jarring. I've occasionally heard that usage, but rarely.

    Anyone know if that's a regional pronunciation anywhere in the US? These speakers did very well--IIRC, Rep. Sylvia Garcia was one, and she spoke very, very well. I wonder if the speakers who used this format maybe aren't used to reading aloud, and just didn't notice?
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    That's another Pond difference: I'd never say "March 29th" - I'd say "29th of March".

    I find the whole cross-Pond date thing very confusing; in Canada anyway, you can never predict when a date on a form is going to ask for dd/mm/yyyy, mm/dd/yyyy or even yyyy/mm/dd - I've seen all three in various official forms. :confused:
  • orfeo wrote: »
    Gramps49 wrote: »
    orfeo wrote: »
    Urban dictionary is not exactly the most reliable source for... well for just about anything.

    Never claimed it was, I was just giving an example of how it "woke" used. But it has been used in American courts to understand what a slang word may mean and the Department of Motor Vehicles of various states will use it to screen out certain words on vanity plates. It is probably no more reliable than Wikipedia since it is open-sourced and edited by volunteers. It is definitely more current than many recognized dictionaries.

    It is actually a lot less reliable than Wikipedia. Many of the example sentences that get submitted are frankly terrible.
    “Reliability” may be the wrong standard to apply to Urban Dictionary. The purpose of UD is to show how slang words and phrases are used. It’s useful to the extent that, upon encountering a new bit of slang, it may help in figuring out what that slang means.

    BTW, I seem to recall that a 2005 study found Wikipedia to be about as accurate as the Encyclopedia Britannica. More recent studies have found it to be around 80% accurate, compared to the 90–95% range of most encyclopedias.
  • Piglet wrote: »
    I find the whole cross-Pond date thing very confusing; in Canada anyway, you can never predict when a date on a form is going to ask for dd/mm/yyyy, mm/dd/yyyy or even yyyy/mm/dd - I've seen all three in various official forms. :confused:

    When writing the date freeform, I'll always abbreviate the month with letters, to remove the ambiguity.
  • I once replied to a business letter dated 4/5/04 (or something like that), referring to it as being of either the 4th of May or the 5th of April, making the sender beautifully angry, but I think he got it. Legally, it could get interesting if the precise date were important.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    Piglet wrote: »
    I find the whole cross-Pond date thing very confusing; in Canada anyway, you can never predict when a date on a form is going to ask for dd/mm/yyyy, mm/dd/yyyy or even yyyy/mm/dd - I've seen all three in various official forms. :confused:

    When writing the date freeform, I'll always abbreviate the month with letters, to remove the ambiguity.

    Yes, I do that to, because being Canadian I can never guess what format we're supposed to be using, so I always write out the month (or an abbreviation thereof) rather than using all numbers.
  • The federal government in things they send to my office are in the form 2020-01-18. I generally write things 18 Jan 2020.

    Re things like 29th, 3rd etc. Here school grades are grade 5, grade 6 etc. I think Americans say 5th grade, 6th grade etc. In my childhood I would hear year 5, year 6 etc at times.

    I was interested to hear someone say "POTUS" on TV. I had only seen it written and thought it was "pot us", as in the cooking vessel + you and me. They said "poat us" rhyming with goat. I suppose said either way if abbreviates "piece of totally useless sh*t" which is the aforementioned urban dictionary's helpfulness. Though I think this may insult excrement if applied to the current one.

    It got me thinking of useful abbreviations for other leaders, the other blond leader Boris could be PMUK which sounds like swearing.
  • While we're here. There's a thread currently called "Bung a Bob for Big Ben Bong." I understand Big Ben, and I understand the bong=ring, and a bob is a unit of coinage. What's "bung"?
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    While we're here. There's a thread currently called "Bung a Bob for Big Ben Bong." I understand Big Ben, and I understand the bong=ring, and a bob is a unit of coinage. What's "bung"?

    Chuck. Lob. Also often used of bribes, generally as a noun.
  • Gill HGill H Shipmate
    Inspired by watching some US Youtubers...

    In the US, Italian foods seem to be lacking their final e when pronounced.

    Provolone is pronounced provo-loan, for example, whereas in the UK it would be provo-loan-ay (as in the Italian).

    Is that a general thing or just specific to these Youtubers?
Sign In or Register to comment.