I've Been Wondering: The 2020 General Questions thread

TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
If you have a question that doesn't fit neatly anywhere else, drop it here!
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  • Wesley JWesley J Shipmate
    Very many thanks indeed once again to all of you for your fabulous advice on varifocals, to which I had posted a question here.

    The new glasses have now arrived, are being worn, and seem rather nice, although they will certainly take about a week to properly adapt to, as the optician says. Due to their clever design (which wasn't exactly cheap, but clearly worth it), I haven't had any significant problems at all getting used to them yet. Looking forward to seeing further (sic!) how this goes. :)

    Thank you!
  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    I would like help in identifying an object. It is two shiny balls in a velvet-lined case When you shake them, they give off a very pleasant musical tone--not the same tone.

    I'm reasonably sure they are Asian, but that's all I know.
  • I was thinking Ben Wa balls, aka Kegel balls.
    :flushed:
    How big are they?
  • IMHO, sounds like the mentioned Baoding balls, which I know as Chinese exercise balls. They sell lots of them in Chinatown here. They're generally a little shiny, and may have some decorative pattern on them. The Wikipedia link has a good pic of them on the right side, maybe 1/2 way down.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    I have been given a 2 litre container full of shelled Brazil nuts (someone over catered an event). I know they can go rancid so was wondering how best to keep them, after sharing some out with friends and neighbours.

    I was planning to freeze them, but I wondered if they would be edible when defrosted.

    Brazils are my second favourite nut , and useful here in NZ where the soil lacks selenium, but I have been told that 2 to 3 a day is the optimum amount if eating regularly.
  • Google suggests they do wonderfully, and can even be frozen and thawed again several times (!) So I wouldn't worry.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Thanks Lamb Chopped. After I have handed some on I was thinking of freezing the remainder in small Ziploc bags so I don't pig out.
  • I fear that wouldn't stop me.
  • Just a thought... I once had a white fish (halibut, perhaps) grilled with a macadamia crust. Could you do the same with Brazil nuts, I wonder. The oil/sweet combination was great.
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    Moo wrote: »
    I would like help in identifying an object. It is two shiny balls in a velvet-lined case When you shake them, they give off a very pleasant musical tone--not the same tone.

    I'm reasonably sure they are Asian, but that's all I know.

    I know those as chime balls. They were quite popular a few years back as a relaxation aid. My cello teacher at the time recommended using them to work on getting your fingers to move independently of one another (rotate the balls around your hand without them touching).
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    I fear that wouldn't stop me.

    It probably won't stop me either to be honest.
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    Wesley J wrote: »
    Very many thanks indeed once again to all of you for your fabulous advice on varifocals, to which I had posted a question here.

    The new glasses have now arrived, are being worn, and seem rather nice, although they will certainly take about a week to properly adapt to, as the optician says. Due to their clever design (which wasn't exactly cheap, but clearly worth it), I haven't had any significant problems at all getting used to them yet. Looking forward to seeing further (sic!) how this goes. :)

    Thank you!

    When I got my first pair of progressive lenses--as they are called in my neck of the woods--it took about a week before I adjusted to them.

    This past summer I went so far as to get transition progressive lenses. Transitions go from clear to dark depending on sunlight. They will get dark pretty fast, but if you go from a bright outside to a dim inside, it is like being blind for a few minutes.
  • Yes I have transition progressive lenses too but over here in UK they are known as photochromic varifocals. Its been wonderful to have one pair of specs to use for everything including reading, driving and sunglasses!
  • A good priest friend of mine (bi-vocational, working a day job) got progressive lenses since in the day job he is always in and out of sunshine. They worked great, until he celebrated Communion and encountered the spotlights shining into the chancel. The lenses darkened as expected, making it very difficult for him to see the altar book. So he is back to the old non-progressive pair, and squints as needed!
  • I am having a strange garage door problem. I can open the door from car or inside no problem, but if it is cold it will not close. It goes down a few feet then stops, and starts back up. As soon as the day warms up no problem. I have checked all around door frame for ice. Nothing. Any clues what might be happening.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    It'll be down to the metal contracting and expanding as the temperature changes.
  • Good thought KarilB, Does not sound like anything fixable.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Good thought KarilB, Does not sound like anything fixable.

    Probably is. Close observation of where it jams and judicious bending might fix it.

    Mechanical engineering is mostly WD40, gaffer tape and careful bending.
  • OffeiriadOffeiriad Shipmate Posts: 29
    My late lamented father, who was reading Quantum Physics on his 98th birthday, believed that WD40 and the 6 inch nail were the two greatest inventions of his lifetime. Everything could be fixed with one or the other.
  • Lily PadLily Pad Shipmate
    I know nothing of the 6 inch nail, but I agree completely with your late lamented father on the multiple uses of WD40.
  • I've always heard that WD40 is for things that should move but don't. Duct tape is for things that shouldn't move but do. (I've never heard of the 6 inch nail either.)
  • WD 40 is next try, my son is coming next week, I am not into standing on step stools. Also after a google search worded "When garage door will not close in the cold," I will be checking sensors to make sure they do now have condensation on them. Amazing what you can find on google. Thanks all.
  • Wesley JWesley J Shipmate
    Offeiriad wrote: »
    My late lamented father [...]
    I read that as 'late laminated father'. But then I would, wouldn't I.

  • daisydaisydaisydaisy Shipmate
    edited February 7
    I know nothing about football so need some help in choosing a football (soccer) that is sturdy enough to withstand long, sharp thorns on trees - it’ll be going to The Gambia where several footballs have met their demise in that way. Any suggestions?
  • I found a thornproof football!
  • Lily PadLily Pad Shipmate
    Get two!
  • WD 40 is next try, my son is coming next week, I am not into standing on step stools. Also after a google search worded "When garage door will not close in the cold," I will be checking sensors to make sure they do now have condensation on them. Amazing what you can find on google. Thanks all.

    WD40 is very good for isolating a problem but will not solve it permanently, because it evaporates and dries. If the problem goes away after the application of WD40, then apply light grease, oil or a silicon lubricant.
  • Noted Stercus Tauri thank you.
  • TelfordTelford Shipmate
    Huia wrote: »
    I have been given a 2 litre container full of shelled Brazil nuts (someone over catered an event). I know they can go rancid so was wondering how best to keep them, after sharing some out with friends and neighbours.

    I was planning to freeze them, but I wondered if they would be edible when defrosted.

    Brazils are my second favourite nut , and useful here in NZ where the soil lacks selenium, but I have been told that 2 to 3 a day is the optimum amount if eating regularly.

    I leave unwanted nuts in a pile in the woods for wild animals in the winter
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    It's summer here. I shared then around and they have all gone :cry:
  • Lily Pad wrote: »
    Get two!
    Great idea - it’s pricier than 2 and can’t be deflated like a regular ball so if I have room in both my case and my budget for another I’ll do that (I’ve been given a wish list as long as my arm!).

  • Unable to sleep (anxiety about Little Beaky) resulted in a night time visit to the kitchen only to discover several Silverfish scurrying about on the floor.......haven't seen one for years and I don't like them at all.
    I clean the kitchen regularly so I feel somewhat affronted by their presence!

    Any ideas about what to do?
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    edited February 12
    Sprinkle strong-smelling spice in cupboard corners, under baseboard of fitted kitchen units, etc. Spray citrus solution on hard surfaces.
  • I think (vaguely) that we used to use Borax in the corners and along baseboards. Though probably not with pets or young children.

    Don't stress--silverfish have been known to eat wallpaper (paste) and old books if they can't find something better. Your housekeeping need not be at fault. (We used to keep everything in glass, and still...)
  • Mom used a powder called diatomaceous earth, as I remember she put it down at night and sweep it up in the morning and then reapplied for several days. You might google it as I do not know just what it is. I think I spelled it right. I do know it worked quickly. This was many moons ago
  • You DID spell it right! :notworthy:

    It's the powdered tiny tiny glassy shells of diatoms, which are sea creatures.
  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    Diatomaceous earth is the ground-up shells of ancient shellfish. It has razor sharp fragments which pierce the exoskeletons of insects, causing them to 'bleed' to death.
  • Lamb ChoppedLamb Chopped Shipmate
    edited February 13
    ...which is why you really don't want to inhale the dust. Use a damp paper towel or something if you clean it up. (Wistfully) but diatoms look really, really pretty under a microscope, like round snowflakes, all different. Google them.
  • carexcarex Shipmate Posts: 22
    I am having a strange garage door problem. I can open the door from car or inside no problem, but if it is cold it will not close. It goes down a few feet then stops, and starts back up. As soon as the day warms up no problem. I have checked all around door frame for ice. Nothing. Any clues what might be happening.

    I had a similar problem with a large roll-up door. It was due to the posts to which it was attached on either side swelling / twisting as they absorbed water or dried out during the year. (The expansion of the metal fittings with temperature will also have an impact.)

    The tracks for the door were attached to the inside faces of the posts on either sided, and the brackets had horizontal slots for the screws, as adjusting the spacing to get it just right is an important part of installing the door. If it binds while rolling down, the controller thinks it has hit something (possibly a person, pet, or car) and it raises the door instead.

    I loosened the big screws that held the track to the post and ran the door up and down a few times to get it positioned properly, then tightened the screws back down. But after having to do this every spring and fall as the weather changed, pretty soon I just left them loose enough that they could slide sideways as needed. After that I never had a problem.
  • Thank you Carex. Son do to arrive this evening to try and sort out problem.. You answer has perfect timing to add to other suggestions.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    I've always heard that WD40 is for things that should move but don't. Duct tape is for things that shouldn't move but do. (I've never heard of the 6 inch nail either.)

    Um .. they're a nail. Six inches long. Don't use them to hang pictures though (except in a barn).

    Is there a difference between WD40 and CRC (and the latter may be only a local thing, I dunno).
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    I had a Triumph Herald that had problems with damp in the engine. Copious quantities of CRC kept it on the road.

    Zappa, there must be a difference because they smell different.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    I think CRC is a specifically New Zealand company, so it’s likely to be an unfamiliar name in some places elsewhere. Certainly Googling CRC from here in the UK didn’t even come up with the company, let alone a lubricant.
  • SipechSipech Shipmate
    Does anyone know how much it costs (in the UK) to learn to drive? Throughout my life, I've either had time or money but never the two at the same time.

    But with the outbreak of coronovirus, the time I have booked off looks unlikely to be able to be used for a holiday, but I have the funds saved up for one. So I'm thinking of diverting the funds and using them to have driving lessons.

    But I honestly have no idea how much an average lesson is nor how many might be needed. This is even before you can think of trying to buy, insure, maintain and fuel a car.
  • @Spike could probably give you some information about this.

    All the best to you in learning to drive.
  • I think I paid £250 or so for a block of 10 lessons for my son, this time last year. It was slightly cheaper to book 10. But there may be regional variation.
  • My daughter spent about £600 on lessons, at £30 a lesson. She was at university and so wasn't getting a chance to practise in the family car between lessons.
  • There are intensive driving courses where, I think, you start on the Monday morning with lesson 1 and finish with a driving test on Friday afternoon.
  • Iirc, a number of the offspring passed this way.....
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