Burning or Binning Things for Jesus

TubbsTubbs Admin
edited February 13 in Heaven
In the Purg thread about the Freedom in Christ course, @la vie en rouge mentioned she'd started a Heaven thread asking what items people had disposed of in fits of religious fervour and now regretted. She's still kind of annoyed about my husband’s Marvel comics.

To help move this particular tangent out of Purg, I'm starting a new one ...

I had some lovely Neil Gamen comics ... binned for Jesus. Before the days of recycling so I have Sins of Landfill to be taken into consideration as well as the one of daftness :disappointed:

My parent's grandfather clock has zodiac signs on it and a more fervent member of my then home-group suggested we get rid of it along with various Chinese things my dad bought back from his travels because they could Let In Demons. (There was a book knocking around at the time which said that some objects could act as Gateways to Hell so couldn't be allowed in your house ever].

My late mother - small, Welsh and no-nonsense - told them if they didn't trust that Jesus could see off any demons it showed they lacked faith. Bit of prayer and Bible reading would soon seem them right ... OTH, that wouldn't do anything about their lack of manners so she gave them The Talk. I'm not sure they quite knew what hit them ...
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Comments

  • I binned a bunch of rock tapes, because I was bit of a chinless wonder as a teenager, and it had been impressed upon me that if they were played backwards you could hear someone singing "Oh my sweetest Satan, how I love you"
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    I think I'd be pretty ticked off if I gave me friend one of my toys for free, and his mother proceeded to throw it in the garbage.

  • Toxic mind control, indeed.

    Once upon a time, I had a large collection of Parish Magazines - I used to buy one if I visited a church on my (then) extensive travels. On being rejected by the church after my marriage broke up in 1988 (some evangelicals just can't handle that sort of thing - disobeying God's laws, I guess), I binned the lot as a gesture of something-or-other... :grimace:

    Not that I'd particularly want them back, but they were, in their own way, historical documents - snapshots of the parishes concerned in the 70s and 80s.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    I binned a bunch of rock tapes, because I was bit of a chinless wonder as a teenager, and it had been impressed upon me that if they were played backwards you could hear someone singing "Oh my sweetest Satan, how I love you"

    But did you suffer in the toolshed?

  • I could end up posting on this thread several times as different things come to mind....
    I'll start with my Lou Reed albums, binned because of their overt sexual references after I'd been on the receiving end of a talk about keeping my heart pure. I honestly don't think my relationship with God deepened as a result and contrary to what was being suggested in the talk the music did not lead me into dodgy behaviour☹
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    MrsBeaky wrote: »
    I could end up posting on this thread several times as different things come to mind....
    I'll start with my Lou Reed albums, binned because of their overt sexual references after I'd been on the receiving end of a talk about keeping my heart pure. I honestly don't think my relationship with God deepened as a result and contrary to what was being suggested in the talk the music did not lead me into dodgy behaviour☹

    Ironically, a few years back, some activists were complaining about Take A Walk On The Wild Side for being sexually conservative. There was a Ship thread about it, started by yours truly.

  • Ohhh, when I was at youth group, they got someone in to talk about Satanism in rock music. They were obviously expecting the standard backward masking and "It's all evil" guff with a heavy plug for Good Christian Music. (At the time this was pretty much Cliff Richard, After the Fire and whatever was on at Greenbelt that year).

    They didn't get it. This sweet old guy told us this was all rubbish and the only thing that playing a record backwards would do is damage it and your stylus. He also said that you should listen whatever music you liked, then talked us through his top heavy rock picks - lots of Led Zeppelin and their ilk. Physical Graffiti was his number one.

    The youth leader looked like he'd swallowed several lemons by the time the evening ended and this chap was never asked back. He's still one of my Christian heroes and I wish I could remember his name.
  • chrisstileschrisstiles Shipmate
    edited February 13
    Tubbs wrote: »
    Ohhh, when I was at youth group, they got someone in to talk about Satanism in rock music.

    Similarly when I was in a youth group, the youth leader invited along a co-worker of his who D&Ded in his spare time to explain what it consisted of.

    Cue me being accosted the following Sunday by an irate parent posing the question "Are you saying there is something good about D&D?" Er. Yes? No? Maybe?
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Tubbs wrote: »
    Ohhh, when I was at youth group, they got someone in to talk about Satanism in rock music...

    Given the apparent theological bent of this youth group, I'm wondering how on Earth they came to invite that particular speaker. It's one thing to invite someone who has sees a couple of issues differently than you do, but it sounds like that guy was the total opposite of what the group was preaching.

    They had obviously heard of the guy before inviting him, so how could they have not known what his views were?

    (Not expecting you to know the explanation for this neccessarily, but if you do, I'd be curious to hear it.)

  • I got quite hung up about my Dad telling me that if I found him a couple of cassettes, a friend of his at work would record me a couple of Dire Straights albums. It wasn't the content I was worried about (!), it was the copyright violation. I think I was right, in a way, but I backslid enough to not care about it in future years - though my gear was bad enough, that most of my copies were hum-and-hiss-city. I was morally quite serious as a young teenager, and I don't want to mock myself now so much as ask myself if I was subsequently always right to let it slide.
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    I did get rid of something I had from my grandparents' kitchen drawer (the one with a mishmash of things), though not for the usual religious reasons. They had a few Indian things, mostly brass artefacts, acquired from the son of my Nana's employer, but this was different. A small carving of dark soapstone, small enough to hold in the hand, flat based for standing on something. On the top was a small round flat topped protrusion, surrounded by a gutter which joined and ran to the front of the object, as if to carry away something poured over it. On one side of this was a small elephant, on the other a small ox. There was a snake somewhere, as well.

    I had been using it as an ornament, when I came to realise it was associated with the worship of Shiva. I decided that it was not appropriate to use it as a "curiosity", but wasn't sure what to do with it. Making it available for educational purposes was suggested. Eventually I gave it to the newsagent, having seen that they had an image of Shiva up behind the counter. They said they would take it to the temple.

    I had a bit of a run of bad luck after that!
  • I got quite hung up about my Dad telling me that if I found him a couple of cassettes, a friend of his at work would record me a couple of Dire Straights albums. It wasn't the content I was worried about (!), it was the copyright violation. I think I was right, in a way, but I backslid enough to not care about it in future years - though my gear was bad enough, that most of my copies were hum-and-hiss-city. I was morally quite serious as a young teenager, and I don't want to mock myself now so much as ask myself if I was subsequently always right to let it slide.

    I think this is quite lovely! Concern about copyright infringement comes from a very different place as it is about ensuring the good of another whereas policing the choices of others involves an element of control ISTM.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    I got quite hung up about my Dad telling me that if I found him a couple of cassettes, a friend of his at work would record me a couple of Dire Straights albums. It wasn't the content I was worried about (!), it was the copyright violation. I think I was right, in a way, but I backslid enough to not care about it in future years - though my gear was bad enough, that most of my copies were hum-and-hiss-city. I was morally quite serious as a young teenager, and I don't want to mock myself now so much as ask myself if I was subsequently always right to let it slide.

    When I was a young kid, my mom asked me to state my age as a year younger at the barber shop, to get a discount. I cried, and after literally asking her "Is That What Jesus Would Do?", she agreed that it wasn't a good idea, and I told the truth and paid full price.

    I have since done things of a lower moral quality than that, but it is somewhat disconcerting to be asked to do something dishonest, by the very person who taught you NOT to do things like that in the first place.

    (Arguably, a place offering discounts on an honours-system is pretty much begging for people to lie.)

  • stetson wrote: »
    When I was a young kid, my mom asked me to state my age as a year younger at the barber shop, to get a discount. I cried, and after literally asking her "Is That What Jesus Would Do?", she agreed that it wasn't a good idea, and I told the truth and paid full price.

    Good Man. I had a similar one where Mum said 'let's not tell Dad the boiler (heating) has been on 6' and I, thinking this must be a big joke and this was my part in the setup (since who would ever lie about things, especially Mum?) - told him with a big smile on my face. That must be more than 40 years ago; they've almost certainly forgotten the moment but I doubt if I will. I wonder what moral failings of mine, will stick in my kids' minds in 40 years time.
  • Tubbs wrote: »
    <snip>

    My parent's grandfather clock has zodiac signs on it and a more fervent member of my then home-group suggested we get rid of it along with various Chinese things my dad bought back from his travels because they could Let In Demons. (There was a book knocking around at the time which said that some objects could act as Gateways to Hell so couldn't be allowed in your house ever].

    My late mother - small, Welsh and no-nonsense - told them if they didn't trust that Jesus could see off any demons it showed they lacked faith. Bit of prayer and Bible reading would soon seem them right ... OTH, that wouldn't do anything about their lack of manners so she gave them The Talk. I'm not sure they quite knew what hit them ...
    Let's hear it for the fearsome Welsh Mam!

    Seriously, what she said about faith was, IMHO, spot on.

    As for all of the paranoia about rock music, if they really think it so demonic how come their praise bands try to imitate it with a Christian twist? Quite apart from anything else, haven't they heard that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery?
  • 1970ish, I gave away my collection of folk-song LPs. Not that there was anything 'wrong' with the songs, that I was aware of, but I did spend far too much of my time listening to, and thinking about them.
    It caused some confusion among my work colleagues, but as they were also folk enthusiasts they were more than happy to help me put that temptation behind me.

    Some years down the line my folk-song collection grew again, but there were plenty of other things in my life so it never became unduly important to me.
    I do regret the ones on vinyl that I gave away, and did replace a few with CDs (mostly Joan Baez), but never got another copy of my particular favourite, "Tommy Armstrong of Tyneside", which sometimes makes me sad because of its associations with one if the colleagues from that time, now deceased.
  • EutychusEutychus Admin
    edited February 13
    I binned a bunch of rock tapes, because I was bit of a chinless wonder as a teenager, and it had been impressed upon me that if they were played backwards you could hear someone singing "Oh my sweetest Satan, how I love you"

    I have mixed feelings about this one. I never really bought into the backwards thing, but around this time I nonetheless did bin (almost) my entire collection (my U2 records survived* as did my green vinyl Greenbelt Live! (1980) album). This was because I felt music was becoming more of a god to me than God. This coincided with me starting to play music for church. I like to think that my move into worship was a fruit of that.

    I've collected a good few of the albums back in various formats and am an avid YouTube listener, not to mention regularly sneaking non-church music into the church band, but I think my priorities have indeed changed and it dates back to then, at least in part.

    ==

    *I was into U2 before almost anybody had heard of them, and not because of any Christian influence. I have (or had) a single from their début album, but I fear it's gone.

    [ETA sorry @Roseofsharon, I didn't see your post when composing mine!]
  • We had an old middle eastern carpet in the church parlour that wasn't in very good condition, but we'd been told it was still quite valuable. However, it had an Arabic inscription around the edge, and our minister, in a mischievous mood - which I have to say I enjoyed - one day told a group of people that it said, "Allah is great". I have no idea what it actually said, and nor did he - it could have been someone's favourite recipe for all I know. A few days later it disappeared, and the word was that a couple of zealots had hauled it to the town dump. The zealots eventually left the congregation. I didn't mind the zealots leaving, but I liked that carpet.
  • One field in which I translate is luxury watchmaking. At one point one of my client's clients made watches in which spent bullets featured majorly. They were very insistent that these were all bullets from target practice and suchlike, but I could never shake the image of some mafioso looming over the watchmaker with his own spent bullet in his hand and 'strongly encouraging' the craftsman to use it, a fistful of banknotes in hand. I was quite relieved when my client dropped that particular client of his.

    (I once regretted doing a translation for a hydroponic installation "for growing tomatoes indoors", and later turned down translating subtitles for porn movies for the same agency ('you can be quite creative, the dialogue doesn't matter much')...)
  • Things I can remember being told I should throw out by members of university Christian Union:
    • All copied cassette tapes (copyright theft)
    • A Gustav Klimt poster of The Kiss (too sexy)
    • Novel by Jeanette Winterson (too gay)
    • The Blind Watchmaker by Dawkins (too atheist)
    • A Levellers album (this was the 90s)(too pagan)
    • Faure’s Requiem (too Catholic)

    I resisted...

    (And now I’m an agnostic, backslidden, lesbian, sweary, barely-ever-churchgoing-and-mainly-for-the-music liberal disgrace. So who knows, maybe if I’d stripped my walls, bookshelves and music, I’d still be there? (Glad I’m not))
  • TubbsTubbs Admin
    edited February 13
    stetson wrote: »
    Tubbs wrote: »
    Ohhh, when I was at youth group, they got someone in to talk about Satanism in rock music...

    Given the apparent theological bent of this youth group, I'm wondering how on Earth they came to invite that particular speaker. It's one thing to invite someone who has sees a couple of issues differently than you do, but it sounds like that guy was the total opposite of what the group was preaching.

    They had obviously heard of the guy before inviting him, so how could they have not known what his views were?

    (Not expecting you to know the explanation for this neccessarily, but if you do, I'd be curious to hear it.)

    The youth leaders wanted someone to talk about Christianity in rock music and someone well thought of in the church recommended him.

    The group - including the leadership- were fairly evenly split between those who’d read Pop Goes The Gospel and thought it was brilliant and those who thought it was rubbish. The pros were out in force that night. The following week someone else would have been leading and we’d have had a very different night
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    The latest issue of Fortean Times has a cover (and accompanying article) on Jack Chick. Mr F had never heard of him, and was happily unaware that RPG is the gateway to Satanism. (Actually, it's the gateway to red wine and too many crisps).
  • As a teenager I read a lot of sci-fi. A certain group at church kept telling me I ought to give it up as it was bad for my faith. I honestly couldn't see this and eventually decided that they simply didn't like sci-fi.

    In addition, I remember a talk warning about the dangers of Rock (and Blues) which said "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" was designed to get us all taking LSD. This also sounded silly to me; by the same logic it should have got us compulsively buying lint. Recently I heard that the drug connection there is an urban myth; John Lennon said the song was based on a picture his son Julian, then 5, drew at school.
  • AravisAravis Shipmate
    Surely it’s unlikely the carpet actually had “Allah is great” inscribed on it, as that would mean anyone who walked on it would be treading on the name of Allah?
  • EutychusEutychus Admin
    edited February 13
    Recently I heard that the drug connection there is an urban myth; John Lennon said the song was based on a picture his son Julian, then 5, drew at school.
    Don't think Lennon is beyond telling a few tall stories; it seems just about every record released in the 60s-70s was about drugs.

    For what I think is in play above, cf. Itchycoo Park. As those responsible for the lyrics tell it:
    when Marriott was told the BBC had banned the song for its overt drug references, Calder confirms:

    We scammed the story together, we told the BBC that Itchycoo Park was a piece of waste ground in the East End that the band had played on as kids – we put the story out at ten and by lunchtime we were told the ban was off.

    See also Horse With No Name, etc. etc.

    (I'm still wondering when my local evo annual christian youth music camp will realise the oddness of their selection of Sting's Englishman in New York one year, since it's about Quentin Crisp...)
  • Eutychus wrote: »
    (I once regretted doing a translation for a hydroponic installation "for growing tomatoes indoors"

    The North East Man and I once ventured into a shop which sold hydroponic equipment. The penny dropped for me as soon as we were inside - the Jamaican flags and the poster which said "Don't drink and drive, get high and fly" were clues - but the North East man was oblivious and entered into an earnest discussion about tomatoes with the young man behind the counter.

    When the NE Man asked him if he'd ever been to the Achiltibuie Hydroponicum, the assistant looked as though he was starting to think he was having a bad trip. Every time the NE Man said "Achiltibuie" he looked more confused.

  • Firenze wrote: »
    The latest issue of Fortean Times has a cover (and accompanying article) on Jack Chick. Mr F had never heard of him, and was happily unaware that RPG is the gateway to Satanism. (Actually, it's the gateway to red wine and too many crisps).

    When I were a lad it was the gateway to Dr. Pepper and Doritos.
  • Eutychus wrote: »
    Recently I heard that the drug connection there is an urban myth; John Lennon said the song was based on a picture his son Julian, then 5, drew at school.
    Don't think Lennon is beyond telling a few tall stories; it seems just about every record released in the 60s-70s was about drugs.

    He certainly is not. But that kind of generalization is reckless, and in this case has led you astray.. I have seen the picture the song is based on, and read an interview of the Lucy who was its subject.

  • (I've been to Achiltibuie - I drove through it on a motorbike in the rain, looking out for it's public toilet and the only opportunity for a free crap in the dry for 2 or 3 hours around :smile: )
  • This is enlightening. Is this still common today- to throw something out "for Jesus"? Completely foreign to me, outside of jokes. Leads to wondering about guilt and shame as the main operative principles in some versions of Christianity.

  • This is enlightening. Is this still common today- to throw something out "for Jesus"? Completely foreign to me, outside of jokes. Leads to wondering about guilt and shame as the main operative principles in some versions of Christianity.

    In my experience, not so much guilt and shame as FEAR. As noted above. If I keep this in my house, the boogie man, or the evil spirits, or whoever, will get me. I can understand someone who doesn't believe in malicious spirits, and someone who believes in malicious spirits but not God; but someone who believes in God, but thinks the malicious spirits are stronger than God? Don't get it. Perfect love casts out fear.
  • Is this still common today- to throw something out "for Jesus"? Completely foreign to me, outside of jokes.
    It’s completely foreign to me, too. I’ve never encountered it.

  • TelfordTelford Shipmate
    I doubt that Jesus wants me to dump the things I love. However I reckon he does want me to give to charity.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Eutychus wrote: »
    Recently I heard that the drug connection there is an urban myth; John Lennon said the song was based on a picture his son Julian, then 5, drew at school.
    Don't think Lennon is beyond telling a few tall stories; it seems just about every record released in the 60s-70s was about drugs.

    He certainly is not. But that kind of generalization is reckless, and in this case has led you astray.. I have seen the picture the song is based on, and read an interview of the Lucy who was its subject.
    The two claims are not mutually exclusive. There's little doubt in my mind, with adult hindsight, that the lyrics to 'Lucy in the Sky...' are drug-related ('Climb in the back with your head in the clouds / And you're gone'), and there's a well-attested history around that period of a cat-and-mouse game in the UK between songwriters and BBC censors to see what could make it past the latter in innocent(ish) disguise.

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Eutychus wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    Eutychus wrote: »
    Recently I heard that the drug connection there is an urban myth; John Lennon said the song was based on a picture his son Julian, then 5, drew at school.
    Don't think Lennon is beyond telling a few tall stories; it seems just about every record released in the 60s-70s was about drugs.

    He certainly is not. But that kind of generalization is reckless, and in this case has led you astray.. I have seen the picture the song is based on, and read an interview of the Lucy who was its subject.
    The two claims are not mutually exclusive. There's little doubt in my mind, with adult hindsight, that the lyrics to 'Lucy in the Sky...' are drug-related ('Climb in the back with your head in the clouds / And you're gone'), and there's a well-attested history around that period of a cat-and-mouse game in the UK between songwriters and BBC censors to see what could make it past the latter in innocent(ish) disguise.

    Well, the story I heard is that Julian Lennon drew a picture of a woman, and when John asked him who it was, Julian replied "It's Lucy. In the sky. With diamonds."

    So, if that's true, but the song is also meant to be about drugs, then we'd have to think that Julian innocently gave him the name, and then John thought "Hey, that acronyms out to LSD! Think I'll work a song around that theme."

    Which I guess is possible.
  • EutychusEutychus Admin
    edited February 14
    Anyone with kids is probably familiar with coded ways of talking about taboo subjects. I can well imagine "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" being an adult household way of referring to LSD when the children were around - one that could easily by picked up in a literalistic sense by the children and turned into a picture, hence the title.
  • Jemima the 9thJemima the 9th Shipmate
    edited February 14
    When I was 16ish, my friend of the same age went to a mind, body & spirit type fair, and bought a crystal on a necklace for me for my birthday. The woman selling it told her to “think of your friend with love” and used this to choose the necklace. My dad made me throw it out because of the “link to the occult”.
    My mum bought him some Harry Potter books as a lighthearted Christmas present once. He threw them out because witchcraft.

    Edit to add, Katy Brand (a UK comedian) did a great tour a few years ago called I was a teenage Christian. The church she was involved in at the time was very anti-Potter, and she does a fabulous rant about it which I can’t do justice, but it’s roughly - why go after Potter? Boy born into humble circumstances, and it’s all about triumph over evil - (basically drawing parallels with Jesus). If you wanted to go after a kid’s book, go after Philip Pullman, but they wouldn’t do that, because they’re TOO HARD. :smiley:
  • Eutychus wrote: »
    I binned a bunch of rock tapes, because I was bit of a chinless wonder as a teenager, and it had been impressed upon me that if they were played backwards you could hear someone singing "Oh my sweetest Satan, how I love you"

    I have mixed feelings about this one. I never really bought into the backwards thing, but around this time I nonetheless did bin (almost) my entire collection (my U2 records survived* as did my green vinyl Greenbelt Live! (1980) album). This was because I felt music was becoming more of a god to me than God.

    Which I can understand to an extent 1 - though that’s more about your relationship to that music than something endemic to that music itself.

    1 I also think that environments like this make people very anxious and can cause them to sometimes sniff out a problem where none exists.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    mousethief wrote: »
    Firenze wrote: »
    The latest issue of Fortean Times has a cover (and accompanying article) on Jack Chick. Mr F had never heard of him, and was happily unaware that RPG is the gateway to Satanism. (Actually, it's the gateway to red wine and too many crisps).

    When I were a lad it was the gateway to Dr. Pepper and Doritos.

    Or coffee and chocolate biscuits. But then someone introduced post-coffee beer and so it begins.... Except now we have to think about our health (what remains of it) and will probably end in bottled water and raw carrot.

    I do remember in the dim and distant a vogue for demon-spotting - a Masonic symbol in a church window was one. African figurines - probably manufactured for the tourist trade by Ghanaian Methodists rather than plucked from blood-boltered altars. Anything Indian - the Maharishi was big at the time. Anything New Agey i.e. Occult.

    And if it wasn't Demonic, it was Of The World.

  • I once caused distress to a very evangelical woman by wearing a skirt with smiling suns on it; she was sure there was something occult about them, though she didn't specify what. I'm glad to say I was never conscious of demons gnawing at my legs when I was wearing it.
  • I started feeling very uneasy about a book on key lines, and felt I had to burn it - no one “made” me, but I was glad I did.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    Ley lines?
  • Hmm. Ley lines are akin to the odd things once listed by Lord Peter Wimsey (bells, cats, and mirrors), so ISWYM.

    Re demonic pop music, all this seems to have passed me by, even though I was in a large Yoof Group at an evangelical C of E church in the 60s and early 70s.

    I find it hard to credit that there are fruitloops who believe, and preach, such Tosh - but, on looking around at the Trumpian/Johnsonian nightmare we are heading into, I wonder if perhaps they were right, and the demons have indeed been allowed to enter...
    :scream:
  • I think a lot of the “demonic” music stuff was around during my time - late 80s to 90s, but I missed it too. I dimly remember a Newsround (news for kids) item on a court case being brought in the US (I think) about whether playing some metal track backwards would summon the devil or incite the listener to commit suicide.

    I think non Christian pop music was frowned on a bit, and friends of mine listened to Christian rock as well as the usual stuff. U2 were considered ok, but I’ve never liked their music much. Having discovered Smash Hits before Jesus, there was no way I was ditching pop music for anyone.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Firenze wrote: »
    I do remember in the dim and distant a vogue for demon-spotting - a Masonic symbol in a church window was one.

    Check out this Pentecostal church from my hometown, paying particular attention to the very top.

    How this managed to get past the selection committee, I don't know. I can only assume there were no spiritual-warfare zealots represented on the panel, or that era(early 70s) was before evangelicals became obsessed with sniffing out demonic imagery.

    The architect himself was a limey immigrant, so maybe he was trying to live out his own version of the famous Monty Python skit? In any case, the church eventually WAS "binned", ie. sold to developers and ripped down. The congregation moved out to the suburbs, and built another shack which broadly resembles the original.

  • O I feel OLD now - clearly, the demonic pop music thingy came along after I'd left that Yoof Group... :grimace:

    Mind you, I never really liked 60s/70s/80s etc. popular music, and still don't. I was more into folk music - but some of that, even if Christianised, is clearly Pagan, and/or Of Satan (all that stuff about the holly and the ivy, for example).

    I will NOT bin The Sans Day Carol for Jesus, or anyone else.
    https://youtube.com/watch?v=VgEbxam7wBA

  • I will NOT bin The Sans Day Carol for Jesus, or anyone else.
    https://youtube.com/watch?v=VgEbxam7wBA

    And Mary bore Jesus, our saviour for to beeeeeeeeeeeee....
    I love it too, my favourite version being by Belshazzar’s Feast.
  • Eutychus wrote: »
    Anyone with kids is probably familiar with coded ways of talking about taboo subjects. I can well imagine "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" being an adult household way of referring to LSD when the children were around - one that could easily by picked up in a literalistic sense by the children and turned into a picture, hence the title.

    Now you're just making shit up. You appear to have decided one thing, and can spin pretty stories to make sure yours is the best explanation. Have you done any research? Have you read A Hard Day's Write or any of the other books about how the Beatles songs were written? Or is this all out of your own head? Would you trust that authority for any other historical question?
  • chrisstileschrisstiles Shipmate
    edited February 14
    I think a lot of the “demonic” music stuff was around during my time - late 80s to 90s, but I missed it too. I dimly remember a Newsround (news for kids) item on a court case being brought in the US (I think) about whether playing some metal track backwards would summon the devil or incite the listener to commit suicide.

    Well, the 80s was also the heyday of PMRC and the various lists of banned words, and within the church there was also much talk about the dangers of syncopation and how rock was evil because it allegedly borrowed rhythms from voodoo.
  • I was a baby Christian when the whole Proctor & Gamble thing hit. For those unfamiliar, a quote from this website:
    For many years P&G used a logo that was in memory of the original 13 colonies in the US. In the 80s, however, someone decided that the logo was satanic. The logo was said to look a lot like a symbol mentioned in the bible, in Revelations 12:1. The company ultimately decided to change their logo when it was publicly announced that their logo was a satanic interpretation of the bible verse.

    The website very politely doesn't directly mention con-evo American Christians, but that's who it was. Click here for a picture of the logo. The only thing wrong with the picture, of course, is that it implies you can see stars inside the rim of a crescent moon, but that's a giant so-what.

    When Christians of my (new) acquaintance started discussing the matter, I was unimpressed and said so. Of course I didn't have all the mentally-loaded Scripture I do now, but I argued that it was just a picture, and moreover since when has a smiling moon been a Satanic symbol? Nobody, so far as I was aware, had produced some earlier "first use" (as they say in the trademark biz) showing that symbol used in a Satanic context. And if against all evidence it were a well-known Satanic symbol, why would a large company be so foolish as to advertise openly that it was Satanic? I hope I convinced a few people.
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