Easter liturgy at home

movabletypemovabletype Shipmate Posts: 5
Toronto Anglican here - all our churches are closed and likely to stay closed for the foreseeable future. On the other hand, Easter is closer than it was.

Hopefully it doesn't come to this, and in normal times it wouldn't really come up, but I'm wondering (thinking ahead) about how to do a Holy Week liturgy of some sort at the household scale? Possibly there aren't resources for this kind of thing.

For example: with access to a back yard, it should be possible to do a version of the Great Vigil, fire and all, but presumably it would have to be grafted on to some form of Evening Prayer.

Comments

  • The Church of England has prepared various resources, some of which may well be suitable for home use with several family members present:
    https://churchofengland.org/more/media-centre/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-churches

    Scroll down a bit to find the relevant sections.
  • I wouldn't do an Easter bonfire indoors in a flat without a fireplace.

    Just sayin' ...
  • I wouldn't do an Easter bonfire indoors in a flat without a fireplace.

    Just sayin' ...

    I have in the past wondered about using that smokeless gel for an indoor fire.
  • Follow the advice of Mr Punch to those about to get married - DON'T!
    :flushed:

    I believe it is both Possible, and Lawful, to celebrate Easter without the fire...just don't leave out the Bees...
    :fearful:
  • movabletypemovabletype Shipmate Posts: 5
    Well, we have a portable fire pit, so we are COMMITTED.
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    I have a fire pit in my back yard (built in, not portable), so I'm planning a fire Saturday night. If I start chanting the Exsultet, however, my neighbors might turn me in for disturbing the peace.

    I have several CDs of Easter music which shall be put to good use.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    I have a fire pit in my back yard (built in, not portable), so I'm planning a fire Saturday night. If I start chanting the Exsultet, however, my neighbors might turn me in for disturbing the peace.

    I have several CDs of Easter music which shall be put to good use.

    Part II of Messiah would be a good start. Time it so that the Hallelujah Chorus is reached as you are lighting the fire at first light. The neighbours ought know that well enough to join in.
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    I'm pretty sure my neighbors on one side are Jewish. Not sure about my neighbor on the other side.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited April 9
    Mrs T put together a Seder plate to try to impart some understanding of Passover in our kids (note we did not pretend or attempt to have a Seder meal). Working with the Eldest's cynicism (KarlLBlet cynical, I hear you ask incredulously) and the youngest's butterfly attention span she did remarkably well.

    I'm making hot cross buns with them while she's at work tomorrow.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Hot cross buns! They may be a victim of The Present Situation at our house this year.

    :disappointed:
  • Thanks for reminding me re HXBs - they're available in our local Co-Op, so I'll (hopefully) be able to buy a pack tomorrow.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited April 9
    I prefer to make my own because I can leave out candied peel, which is a by-product of Satan having the hard skin on his feet removed.
  • /pedant alert/

    I think you might mean his hooves...
  • cgichardcgichard Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Hot cross buns!
    The 6-packs of fruit buns that I usually buy appeared with a cross on top before the beginning of Lent this year. I've been buying them regardless as, despite the cross, they are not at all spiced, so in my opinion they are not true hot cross buns and, in any case, I don't heat or toast them.

  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited April 10
    Alas, the queue at the Co-Op this morning was far too long for me to cope with, so I will have to see if Buns can be bought somewhere tomorrow...
    :disappointed:
  • Bakers are open - if you have one nearby.

    Although Co-op HXBs are nice!
  • angloidangloid Shipmate
    A big if in most places these days.
  • There's a good local chain of artisan bakers open in South Wales/West Country, and another in South London. (Not Gregg's though!)
  • Nothing really handy, and I don't want to get pulled over by The Plague Police if I venture Too Far.

    I doubt if pleading that HXBs are essential to my religious beliefs would convince them...
  • movabletypemovabletype Shipmate Posts: 5
    So, we got the job done. It perhaps made up in enthusiasm for what it lacked in polish. Sources included the American 1979 BCP, the Deposited Book, the SMM order of service from last year, and the 1962 Canadian BCP. Started before darkness and was abbreviated (very abbreviated) due to the attention span of small people, given that our youngest is 5 and was up past his bedtime, but we managed parts of the Exsultet, Mary Magdalene's discovery of the empty tomb, the Gloria, the Easter greeting, and various collects, including the one for a time of epidemic that Living Church flagged this week.

    Child 1 (14) was in charge of fire, child 2 (11) read about the empty tomb, child 3 (5) banged a steel bowl as directed, more or less.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Sounds great, @movabletype! Well done! And a great memory for your kids (and you).

    But forgive my ignorance, please. The Deposited Book? The SSM?

  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    St Sanity managed online - a simple eucharist with a very slightly modified APBA Second Order. At the appropriate time, Madame cracked the cheese wafer in union with the Rector and then I held up a couple of small glasses of port. It's not the same, but keeps us in some communion. Then we stayed online for a bit of post-service chat. Alas, no pre-dawn service outside with a fire, and the lighting of the Paschal Candle from that fire. Not this year, may things return to normal next Easter.
  • We're behind you all, but the three of us plan to go into our deserted church basement room and do a simple bilingual liturgy--Mr Lamb preaching of course, LL on piano, me as lector. We're hoping to put it up on Facebook for those of our people who use the internet (unfortunately limited, due to generation). Still, we'll do our best.
  • PDRPDR Shipmate
    edited April 12
    We briefly contemplated the two of us doing the Easter Vigil across the road, but even though our social distancing is not as severe as the UK's, we decided the new fire would attract cops like moths to a candle.
  • That's hilarious.
  • PDRPDR Shipmate
    The irony is that our family has at least three cops in it. My wife, her son and grandson. Nick! Nick! and out!
  • I'd like to see you do a full liturgy, complete with robes and smells 'n' bells, AND the new fire... and video the cops' reactions.

    I can see it now. "Is this some sort of witchcraft?"
  • Jengie JonJengie Jon Shipmate
    Not quite Easter Fire but I think the most memorable part of the Easter Vigil this year.
  • Well done, St M's!
    :wink:
  • ForthviewForthview Shipmate
    A Happy Easter to all and I echo BF's 'Well done' to St Matthew's
    In the priest's homily at the Mass I 'attended' this morning the priest said that he had been struck forcibly by the words of Jesus in the Reading of the Passion last Sunday : 'My time is near. It is at YOUR house that I am keeping Passover with my disciples' It is ,for most of us, in OUR house that we have celebrated the Feast and in whatever ways we have found to be appropriate.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited April 12
    There is, however, a certain irony in the possibility that very few people will actually see St M's Paschal Candle, except online!

    BTW, the service I watched online included the lighting of the Paschal Candle, and the Renewal of Baptismal Vows. I duly (as invited) had candle and water handy, so as to join in as appropriate. I also had bread and wine to hand, to make my virtual Communion along with the Bishop and his wife.

    Whether this was theologically sound or not is for others to debate (!), but I feel that I have, indeed, been united with others in receiving the Blessed Sacrament.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    PDR wrote: »
    The irony is that our family has at least three cops in it. My wife, her son and grandson. Nick! Nick! and out!
    You called? :wink:


    We’ll go around the corner in a few hours to my mother-in-law’ house (permitted under our shelter-in-place directives) for streaming church. Our congregation is pairing with another local congregation of our tribe, historically African American, for the service today. The minister of that congregation will preach (from where he is) and our minister will preside at the Table from our place. Music will be provided by folks from both places.

    I’m going over early to start the pork roast, rice pilaf and roasted asparagus lunch. Working with what we have.
  • ForthviewForthview Shipmate
    Bon appetit !
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    Jengie Jon wrote: »
    Not quite Easter Fire but I think the most memorable part of the Easter Vigil this year.

    The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.
    (I'm in tears.)
  • O yes. Amen and Amen.

    I wasn't in any way decrying St M's valiant act of witness and faith, for that is what it is.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Forthview wrote: »
    Bon appetit !
    Thanks! Based on the reactions, I’d say I did pretty well, if I may say so myself.

    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    We’ll go around the corner in a few hours to my mother-in-law’ house (permitted under our shelter-in-place directives) for streaming church. Our congregation is pairing with another local congregation of our tribe, historically African American, for the service today. The minister of that congregation will preach (from where he is) and our minister will preside at the Table from our place. Music will be provided by folks from both places.
    The service went remarkably well, given that it switched between at least 3 different locations, though I guess it’s possible that some parts were pre-recorded.

    We did do virtual Communion (I know that part was live), and it worked well. We had all been advised in advance and encouraged to actually “set the table” where we were, with linen, etc.

    What I didn’t expect was that a slide show had been prepared to play during Communion, with music from one of the organists. It showed pictures of gatherings of people in both of our two congregations—some from worship, including the Ash Wednesday service we did together, and some from other activities both at church and in the community. I was skeptical of the idea when I heard it, but I was surprised at how appropriate it was. It was good to see people, and I realized how much I miss being able to look at people one by one and sometime exchange smiles, as we all go forward to receive.

    And it was a nice reminder that we started Lent with the other congregation, as we’ve been trying to deepen the relationship between us. We didn’t plan to close the Lenten loop at Easter together as well, but how nice it was that we did.

  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    That sounds wonder full, and must have done more than anything else deepening your community and fellowship.
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Meanwhile the Anglican Diocese of Auckland sends Easter greetings. :smiley:
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    Zappa wrote: »
    Meanwhile the Anglican Diocese of Auckland sends Easter greetings. :smiley:
    Their Diocesan conventions must be fun.
    :smile:
  • Or possibly not...
    :grimace:

    (I'm reminded of The Dancing Priest in Father Ted...)
  • CyprianCyprian Shipmate
    We hadn't planned to have any Holy Week or Pascha services at my little mission this year as I was supposed to be at one of our communities in France - a trip that had to be cancelled.

    So I had only a few days to prepare in English services that I thought I would have another year to prepare. As such, Paschal Nocturns was a bit too much on top of Palm Sunday & Good Friday. I just didn't have the time. So my bishop gave me a blessing to adapt Vespers with excerpts from Paschal Nocturns and do that for this year.

    So that's what we did, from the little domestic chapel from which I'm currently streaming services.

    Here's our little effort at celebrating the Resurrection.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    @Cyprian I'm confused. I thought the Orthodox Easter is next Sunday.
  • CyprianCyprian Shipmate
    edited April 13
    Enoch wrote: »
    @Cyprian I'm confused. I thought the Orthodox Easter is next Sunday.

    There isn't really an "Orthodox Easter" as such - it's a bit of a misnomer, but a common one. There are two main methods of calculating Easter: the Julian paschalion and the Gregorian paschalion. Both are to be found in different churches - Orthodox and non-Orthodox alike.

    So for instance, although the majority of Catholics and Anglicans use the Gregorian method, the Ukrainian Catholic Church (and I've recently learnt the Anglican Diocese of Egypt) use the Julian method.

    And while most Orthodox use the Julian method, it isn't universal in Orthodoxy. For instance, among the Oriental Orthodox, the Indian (Malankara) Orthodox Church uses the Gregorian date, and so does the Armenian Church (outside of Armenia). Among the Eastern Orthodox, the Orthodox Church of Finland also uses the Gregorian date and until recently so did the communities of the Ecumenical Patriarchate in Estonia. In the Western Orthodox communion, we all use the Gregorian date.

    I'm sure there must be other examples.
  • movabletypemovabletype Shipmate Posts: 5
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Sounds great, @movabletype! Well done! And a great memory for your kids (and you).

    But forgive my ignorance, please. The Deposited Book? The SSM?

    Sorry - cut and pasted too freely from my Facebook account. SMM: St Mary Magdalene's, Toronto, our place; our rector kindly sent along the pew leaflet from last year. The Deposited Book was the CofE's attempt at a new BCP in the 1920s, which has an intercessory prayer for epidemics.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Sounds great, @movabletype! Well done! And a great memory for your kids (and you).

    But forgive my ignorance, please. The Deposited Book? The SSM?

    Sorry - cut and pasted too freely from my Facebook account. SMM: St Mary Magdalene's, Toronto, our place; our rector kindly sent along the pew leaflet from last year. The Deposited Book was the CofE's attempt at a new BCP in the 1920s, which has an intercessory prayer for epidemics.
    Ah, thanks. I’m familiar with the CofE’s proposed 1928 BCP, but I somehow don’t recall hearing it referred to as “the Deposited Book.”

  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Nor had I. And i'm afraid to say that I'd never have associated SMM with a particular church in Toronto.
  • I feel free to comment, as it's not my home. SMM is a well known bastion (perhaps not the right word for a humble but beautiful building - reflecting its Patroness, I suppose!) of Anglo-Catholicism in Toronto, with a very long and rich musical tradition, known for its long association with Healey Willan. The congregation, when I've visited, as a stranger, has been very warm, contrary to a misconception that being A-C equates to being stiff or standoffish. SMM's style and theology are not mine, but I do love what they do. (Writing all this makes me think that I'm overdue for a visit, once we're again permitted such things!)
Sign In or Register to comment.