Food of Comfort.

With so much going on now in the world I think we could all use a little comfort food. What childhood delight, special memory dish, or sweet dessert bring you comfort? When I was growing up in the USA my French neighbor would give me an afternoon snack of a slice of French bread, with butter topped with sliced radish and salt. It is still my favorite go to snack.
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Comments

  • We (LL and I) just made two lazy peach pies with graham cracker crust. Brown sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Perfectly ripe peaches. Mmmmmmm.
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    My mum’s toffee apples! She used to make them for Bonfire Night (5th November UK). Oh, and her rice pudding - I’ve never been able to get it tasting the same.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    Pancakes with gravy. (Not milk gravy like you serve on biscuits, but gravy gravy like you serve with a roast for dinner.)
  • DoublethinkDoublethink Shipmate
    Garlic cheest porridge, (adapted grits recipe.) Also, separately, chocolate spiced porridge.

    Yes, I like the texture of porridge.
  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    Buttered noodles. Not a great deal of flavor but very comforting.
  • Ethne AlbaEthne Alba Shipmate
    Pancakes........of Any variety!
  • Fresh baked bread and butter with Heinz tomato soup.
  • NicoleMR wrote: »
    Buttered noodles. Not a great deal of flavor but very comforting.
    Preach it sister.


  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Proper pancakes. Which is to say a batter of flour, sugar and buttermilk with a pinch of baking soda. Spooned on to the top of a cast iron range previously greased with butter. Top with sugar, lemon juice and so much butter it runs down your arm when you roll them up.

    Come to think of it, another childhood I-wouldn't-dare-eat-that-now was a less runny version of the same mix, cut into circles with a hole in the middle then deep fried. And rolled in sugar - gravy rings.

    I remember making these when I was about 12 - thereby launching a lifetime of culinary experiment and weight issues.
  • Vanilla, brown sugar and bourbon icecream. Over the pie.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Pancakes with gravy. (Not milk gravy like you serve on biscuits, but gravy gravy like you serve with a roast for dinner.)

    Pancakes - with gravy? We are divided by so much....

  • My comfort foods, and my constant go-to at the moment, are either McVities digestive biscuits (must be McVities, and not chocolate ones), or Bovril spread on toast.
    I eye the bathroom scales with dread - from a distance.

  • Pancakes - with gravy? We are divided by so much....

    But you probably like Yorkshire pudding with gravy...it's pretty much the same batter mixture!

  • cgichardcgichard Shipmate
    KitKat. My godfather somehow obtained a carton of them during wartime rationing. I was allowed one "finger" a day. Even now when I see someone devouring a whole slab at a time, I gasp in horror.
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    edited July 22
    Mine is bread and milk. I was served it by my Dad when not well. White bread broken into chunks, heated up with whole milk and soft brown sugar (that last may be my variation) and served in a pudding basin.
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    My ultimate comfort food is Chinese noodle soup with shrimp dumplings. I developed my predilection for it when I had horrible morning sickness and it was one of the few things I could get down. Hot, rather bland, a little bit salty and just the right amount of stodge.
  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    It has to be coffee and walnut cake, though pasta and pesto is pretty high up there too.
  • mashed potato with grated cheese - grilled to make the top brown and crispy
  • cgichard wrote: »
    KitKat. My godfather somehow obtained a carton of them during wartime rationing. I was allowed one "finger" a day. Even now when I see someone devouring a whole slab at a time, I gasp in horror.

    So I shouldn't tell you that I eat KitKats by unwrapping the whole thing, and taking a bite out of the end, then?
  • 2 finger, or 4?
  • 4 :naughty:
  • Tuna pasta bake made from roughly equal quantities of pasta, cheese, tinned tuna and tinned cream-of-mushroom soup.

    Cream crackers with butter and cheese: roughly equal quantities of cracker, butter and cheese.
  • Oh, and Jude's "Ginger Spice" ice-cream with maple syrup and a capful of brandy...
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Baked beans and fresh baguette (thickly) spread with cold butter.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Talking of thickly spread cold butter - but it has to be on an Ormo plain loaf (not pan). Then topped with hot chips (salted and vinegared).
  • RuthRuth Admin Emeritus
    Good Lord, all this fancy cooking! Peanut butter, right out of the jar.
  • HelixHelix Shipmate
    Carbs. in any format.
  • Lots of YayLots of Yay Shipmate Posts: 39
    Ice cream with some form of carbs in or with it (cookies, cookie dough, brownie...). Or vanilla ice cream with sweetened condensed milk. Doesn’t matter how cold it is outside. Ice cream warms my soul.
  • Ruth wrote: »
    Peanut butter, right out of the jar.
    Which is why I don't have peanut butter in the house any more - and certainly not at the same time as Nutella!

  • TelfordTelford Shipmate
    Bacan and egg sandwiches
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Cheese.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Corn pudding.

  • Telford wrote: »
    Bacan and egg sandwiches
    I’m with you on this. Or butter on fresh warm baguette.

    Actually, for someone who generally eats low carb, my comfort food is definitely carby. I love suet dumplings or milk puddings. I recently tracked down dried tapioca online having found it impossible to get in shops now.
  • cgichardcgichard Shipmate
    Tapioca, ugh! Shades of boarding-school meals. We used to call it frogs' spawn. It took me years to discover that part of the reason I loathed milk puddings was lactose intolerance.
  • Golden KeyGolden Key Shipmate
    Re: sweetened condensed milk:

    Anyone else ever have the caramelized pudding made by cooking the whole, unopened can in a saucepan of water on the stove? IIRC, sometimes was made by putting the can directly in the water, maybe medium heat or a low boil, and I think it had to cook for hours. Sometimes, IIRC, the can was steamed with the can in a dish in a saucepan. Once it was done, it had to cool for a long time. Then you opened the can and both ends, and pushed the solid pudding out. It had creases from the side of the can--kind of like (US) canned cranberry sauce does, once chilled. (Commonly served at US Thanksgiving dinner.)

    The pudding is brown and very caramelly--and *extremely* rich and sweet. Best to eat it a slice at a time.

    These days, I think you're supposed to punch holes in one of the can before cooking, so that steam can escape. Good idea. Wouldn't want the can to blow up, sending burning-hot pudding everywhere!

    But it tasted really, really good, as a special treat.
    :)
  • Golden KeyGolden Key Shipmate
    Re tapioca pudding:

    I think it can be made with tapioca powder/flakes, rather than the pearl form. I'm pretty sure I've had that version many times. I'm not especially fond of the little pearls being in my pudding! Big difference in the texture. And you could probably use a plant-based milk.

    FWIW, YMMV.
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    Golden Key wrote: »
    Re: sweetened condensed milk:

    Anyone else ever have the caramelized pudding made by cooking the whole, unopened can in a saucepan of water on the stove?

    But it tasted really, really good, as a special treat.
    :)


    My mother would make it occasionally and sometimes would use the caramel to stick plain biscuits (cookies) together ie in pairs with the gooey caramel as the filling.
    Or use it as the middle layer in chocolate caramel slice:
    https://www.foodlovers.co.nz/recipes/weetbix-slice.html
  • Golden Key wrote: »
    These days, I think you're supposed to punch holes in one of the can before cooking, so that steam can escape. Good idea. Wouldn't want the can to blow up, sending burning-hot pudding everywhere!
    :)

    No, don't do this. Submerge the can in water, and simmer for a couple of hours.

    And then make banoffee pie with it (biscuit base, toffee from cooking condensed milk, sliced banana, whipped cream, grate chocolate on top.)
  • Here in California we call it dulce de leche . Leorning Cniht is right do not open can but make sure the can is covered in water the whole time to keep it from exploding.
  • Golden Key wrote: »
    Re: sweetened condensed milk:

    Anyone else ever have the caramelized pudding made by cooking the whole, unopened can in a saucepan of water on the stove? IIRC, sometimes was made by putting the can directly in the water, maybe medium heat or a low boil, and I think it had to cook for hours. Sometimes, IIRC, the can was steamed with the can in a dish in a saucepan. Once it was done, it had to cool for a long time. Then you opened the can and both ends, and pushed the solid pudding out. It had creases from the side of the can--kind of like (US) canned cranberry sauce does, once chilled. (Commonly served at US Thanksgiving dinner.)

    The pudding is brown and very caramelly--and *extremely* rich and sweet. Best to eat it a slice at a time.

    These days, I think you're supposed to punch holes in one of the can before cooking, so that steam can escape. Good idea. Wouldn't want the can to blow up, sending burning-hot pudding everywhere!

    But it tasted really, really good, as a special treat.
    :)

    Erin did this and there was a long discussion of it on the old Ship, on a thread now in Limbo. (Nobody would believe her)
  • Here in California we call it dulce de leche . Leorning Cniht is right do not open can but make sure the can is covered in water the whole time to keep it from exploding.

    I have a memory that I heard a story of a cookbook that had to be recalled because they forgot the "cover with water" step in the instructions, and told people to put the unopened can in a saucepan and heat for 2 hours. (Don't do that. It will explode. This is not a joke.)
  • HarryCHHarryCH Shipmate
    Bacon sandwich on pumpernickel with cheddar cheese (and a lot of bacon).
  • Lots of YayLots of Yay Shipmate Posts: 39
    edited July 23
    Mmmm condensed milk caramel. Yes please.

    Having said that, after a bad day I have been known to just eat the plain condensed milk out of the tin. In times of crisis, one cannot wait for it to caramelise!

    Edit: but putting it on ice cream helps to dilute the sweetness a bit
  • Penny S wrote: »
    Mine is bread and milk. I was served it by my Dad when not well. White bread broken into chunks, heated up with whole milk and soft brown sugar (that last may be my variation) and served in a pudding basin.
    You are the first person I have come across other than myself who has had this! My Mum used to call this POBS (when I was a child I thought it was an exotic name but I was disillusioned as an adult when she told me it simply was an acronym for Pieces of Bread!). It's great to know that there is someone else out there who had this as a childhood comfort food.

    My adult comfort food is toast with peanut butter. The bread has to be thick white with butter on as well as peanut butter and the peanut butter has to be the crunchy variety!
  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    Batter bread, made with water-ground cornmeal and buttermilk.
  • You can buy condensed milk ready cooked into caramel these days (but it is Nestle so I don’t buy it and boil a Waitrose tin instead). I use it for banoffee pie. But my favourite use for a tin of condensed milk is to add double cream and ground almonds to make kulfi, Indian ice cream.
  • CathscatsCathscats Shipmate
    In this house condensed milk is only used when I make tablet. And I only make tablet when there is a fundraising project in the offing, so that very little of it stays in the house! Some things are too good and too bad for you!
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    edited July 24
    A friend's wife just gave me some of that that chocolate caramel slice with the caramelised condensed milk!

    https://cdn-eu-ec.yottaa.net/57eaa34c2bb0ac1299000018/www.foodinaminute.co.nz/v~4b.39/var/fiam/storage/images/recipes/chocolate-caramel-slice/5834753-10-eng-US/Chocolate-Caramel-Slice_recipeimage.png?yocs=5_


    I'd asked him to look for some Twinings Lady Grey and he'd found some in a distant supermarket. (He's awfully Evo but we do get on well because he is a Good Person when it comes to practical help and Christian Action.) He dropped by just now and included in the bag was the Chocolate Caramel Slice from his wife who I don't know well at all
    Completely unexpected ... it must be the Holy Spirit.

    [Galilit Reaching for an N.I.V. to open at random for an apposite verse!]

  • Robertus LRobertus L Shipmate
    At the supermarket yesterday, I picked up some heavily discounted full milk and bread, which naturally suggested to me the traditional Liverpool dish of Wet Nelllie (aka Dockers' Wedding Cake).

    The (preferably) stale bread is soaked in the milk for a few hours and then mixed with Demerara sugar, butter, eggs, mixed spice and dried vine fruits, topped with caster sugar and nutmeg, then baked. As always with such traditional dishes there are as many variations as cooks, and the exact recipe depends on what you happen to have to hand. Can be eaten warm or cold. It's comforting and delicious either way

    The somewhat unusual name is said to derive from the similarity of the pudding to a cake from the town of Nelson in Lancashire - the Liverpool version being more moist.

    @mousethief might be interested to know that this was a favourite dish of Brian Jaques, one of whose earliest stage works was 'Brown Bitter, Wet Nellie and Scouse'*

    *Brown bitter is a mix of half brown ale and half bitter ale from the local Higgsons Brewery, scouse is of course the (very) thick stew of lamb or beef, potatoes, onion and carrots from which the demonym 'Scouser' comes
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    That sounds remarkably like bread pudding, which my Dad liked.

    I believe there are others than Nestle who sell the ready caramelised condensed milk, as I have some in my cupboard. Try the Co-op, Lidl or Aldi.
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