Healing music

Fr TeilhardFr Teilhard Shipmate
edited August 27 in Heaven
While out running a couple errands today, my car radio was tuned to Minnesota Public Radio (classical) (as usual) and Rimsky-Korsakov's "Russian Easter Overture" came on ...

It's one of those pieces that I simply must finish hearing until the last full measure ... I NEVER tire of hearing that one ...

Some others -- Ralph Vaughan Williams, "Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis," and Alan Hovhannes, "Mysterious Mountain" ... and of course anything by Palestrina ...
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  • RVW's The Lark Ascending...
  • RVW's The Lark Ascending...

    ... that too ..
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited August 27
    RVW's The Lark Ascending...
    Yes, and his Five Mystical Songs.

    Samuel Barber’s Adagio for Strings, Copland’s Appalachian Spring, Quiet City and music for Our Town, Randall Thompson’s Alleluia and “Ye Shall Have a Song“ from The Peaceable Kingdom, Alan Hovhannes’ Prayer of St. Gregory, and Pavel Chesnokov’s Spaséniye sodélai/ Salvation is Created come
    to mind, too.

  • And I could add the last movement of Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 (the Resurrection Symphony), the Good Friday Music from Wagner’s Parsifal, and Faure’s Cantique de Jean Racine. The last one requires singing along if possible.

    I imagine I’ll continue to think of others, or be able to respond “yes, that too!,” to what other shipmates say.

  • Music hath charms ...
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    edited August 28
    RVW's The Lark Ascending...

    We were out driving the other day, and listened to an account of that by the Australian Chamber Orchestra with Richard Tognetti both directing and playing the solo violin. By far the best we've heard for decades, exceptionally moving at the deepest levels.

    If ever we're allowed to travel again, we'd like to visit the sort of country RVW had in mind when writing it. Norfolk??
  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    RVW's The Lark Ascending...
    Yes, and his Five Mystical Songs.

    Samuel Barber’s Adagio for Strings, Copland’s Appalachian Spring, Quiet City and music for Our Town, Randall Thompson’s Alleluia and “Ye Shall Have a Song“ from The Peaceable Kingdom, Alan Hovhannes’ Prayer of St. Gregory, and Pavel Chesnokov’s Spaséniye sodélai/ Salvation is Created come
    to mind, too.

    My CD copy of "Copland conducting Copland" arrived in the mail earlier this week. It has the original small orchestra version of the whole Appalachian Spring as well as some other works. I think my memory of this disc was jogged by your mentioning the piece a few months ago.

  • More recent spiritual songs, too ...

    Kansas, "Dust in the Wind" ... live, unplugged ...
    Alanis Morissette, "Uninvited," and "Thank You" ... live, unplugged ...
    Little River Band, "Help Is On Its Way" ...
    Raffi, "Thanks A Lot" ...
    Joni Mitchell and Crosby, Stills and Nash, "Get Together" ...
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    We were driving earlier today and heard Appalachian Spring
  • deletoiledeletoile Shipmate Posts: 4
    Im wunderschönen Monat Mai - Heine/Schumann and many of the above!
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    I recently discovered an incredibly minor Russian composer called Kalinnikov. He wrote only 2 symphonies but he's amazing. Died of TB - didn't they all - at an early age after a short life of poverty and lack of recognition

    And of course (like all New Zealanders of A Ceratin Age) Sibelius' Karelia Suite
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Galilit wrote: »

    And of course (like all New Zealanders of A Ceratin Age) Sibelius' Karelia Suite

    Of course. :smiley:
  • Galilit wrote: »
    I recently discovered an incredibly minor Russian composer called Kalinnikov. He wrote only 2 symphonies but he's amazing. Died of TB - didn't they all - at an early age after a short life of poverty and lack of recognition

    And of course (like all New Zealanders of A Ceratin Age) Sibelius' Karelia Suite

    The first LP I bought when in high school, and still possess, was a selection of Sibelius works including the Karelia Suite. I still love the alla marcia movement which demonstrates his complete mastery of writing for brass.

    The slow movement of RVW's Pastoral Symphony with its haunting trumpet call - beauty out of tragedy. Where Corals Lie from Elgar's Sea Pictures. In Australian classical music, Peter Sculthorpe's Small Town and the didgeridoo music of William Barton.

    This week, I've been listening as I worked to selections from the complete EMI recordings by Paul Robeson. One of my late mother's favourite voices, and a legacy I treasure.

    So many more, depending upon mood.
  • When my father was dying (over 20 years ago, seems like yesterday) I used to lie down and listen to Rachmaninov’s Vocalise. Hauntingly beautiful, it made me cry, but it also healing.
    My favourite choral peace in Allegri’s Miserere (Kings College Choir, directed by Cleobury), so beautiful.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    RVW's The Lark Ascending...


    If ever we're allowed to travel again, we'd like to visit the sort of country RVW had in mind when writing it. Norfolk??

    I didn't know much about the piece, and I looked it up. The poem which apparently inspired it contains the lines
    For singing till his heaven fills,
    'Tis love of earth that he instils,
    And ever winging up and up,
    Our valley is his golden cup,

    If I were looking for a valley in England, Norfolk isn't the first place that springs to mind :smile: There's something about sheep and meadows a bit later on - I'd go for Yorkshire Dales if you're moved by hills and sheep, and maybe Cotswolds if you like something more arable...and full of tourists!
  • RicardusRicardus Shipmate
    Galilit wrote: »
    I recently discovered an incredibly minor Russian composer called Kalinnikov. He wrote only 2 symphonies but he's amazing. Died of TB - didn't they all - at an early age after a short life of poverty and lack of recognition

    And of course (like all New Zealanders of A Ceratin Age) Sibelius' Karelia Suite

    Ooooh another Kalinnikov fan! I thought I was the only person who had ever heard of him.
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    Me too!
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    This has made me pull over the car to listen to the end more than once. Sublime Tippett.
    https://youtube.com/watch?v=SNqTeQa7MDQ
  • Barnabas62Barnabas62 Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host, Epiphanies Host
    Perhaps not surprisingly this is a thread for Heaven! So I’m asking Admin to move it.

    B62 Purg Host
  • I'm in a This is Serious Mum phase at the moment. Every time I see a woman speaking at the Republican National Convention, this song comes to mind. Thunderbirds are Coming Out

    I realise this is lowering the tone...
  • Hosts on both sides of the border have concluded that this thread is more Heavenly than Purgatorial.

    So up it goes.

    DT
    Admin
  • Gorecki’s Symphony of Sorrowful Songs / Symphony number 3 was gifted to me during a bad time. Very healing.....
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    mark_in_manchester, thanks for that. Who knows when we can travel again - next year, the year after that, ever in our lives?

    Barnabas_Aus, can't disagree with anything you say. Robeson's voice was unique, perfect for his repertoire and much else as well. Barton's playing often moves us to tears, but sometimes to extreme joy.

    Reverting to Appalachian Spring - we've never been to the Appalachians. Many years ago, we did a train journey from NY to Chicago via Albany. Would that have taken us through the Appalachians? I was particularly thinking of the mountains either side of the Hudson.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    ... Ralph Vaughan Williams, "Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis," ...
    Yes yes yes!

    It was David's favourite piece of music; he used to say if he was feeling down, it always made him feel better. He made an absolutely magic organ transcription of it, which made my spine tingle. :heartbreak:
  • More recent spiritual songs, too ...

    Kansas, "Dust in the Wind" ... live, unplugged ...
    Oh yes! Nothing gets me back to 17-year-old me, driving on my own with the car windows down and wind blowing through my hair than "Dust in the Wind."

    @Marsupial, enjoy the Copland CD! I can think of little by him I don't love.

    @Gee D, yes, I assume you went through the Appalachians to get from NYC to Albany to Chicago by train. The Hudson Valley is, as I understand it, part of the Appalachian region, with Appalachian highlands to the west. The Appalachians are quite extensive (extending from Alabama and Georgia to Canada) and extremely varied. As I understand it, the ballet for which Appalachian Spring was written in set in Pennsylvania.

  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Vaughan Williams Five Variants of Dives and Lazarus: Borodin Polovtsian Dances - they both seem snatches of music from another, better world.
  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    I’ve just spent a few days with a baroque flute maker, and realise that I know sod all about classical music. I ought to explore more.
    My go to is Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks. The whole album.
  • jrwjrw Shipmate
    Oboe Concerto is probably my second favourite VW piece after The Lark Ascending.
  • RicardusRicardus Shipmate
    Galilit wrote: »
    Me too!

    My parents had (and still have) an enormous CD collection and I used to just pick things at random, which is how I found Kalinnikov. The almost-as-minor Swedish composer Wilhelm Stenhammar was another gem I found by this method. From memory, he had quite a successful career as a conductor but as a composer he was handicapped by a completely unjustified inferiority complex; he thought he was mediocre because he wasn't Wagner or Nielsen. Which is a lesson in why one shouldn't obsessively compare oneself to others ...
  • Bach's solo cello suites.

    Someone played the first part at my wife's funeral. She'd been learning to play it on the cello.

    'Angels waft her through the skies' from Handel's 'Jephthah' was particularly helpful at that time.

    Allegri's 'Misere'.

    Almost anything by Byrd and Tallis. 'Spem in Alium'.

    Victoria's Masses.

    Palestrina.

    Rachmaninoff's 'Vespers'.

    Gorecki's 'Symphony of Sorrowful Songs'.

    Changing mood, 'Take Five' by Dave Brubeck.

    Some Gospel.

    Yes, to the Vaughan Williams pieces mentioned.

    Some folk - early Kate Rusby and Martin Simpson.

    Purcell - lots of Purcell. Almost anything by Purcell.

    Faure's 'Requiem'. Some Saint Saens. Some Tchaikovsky. Ravel's 'Pavane pour une infante defunte.'

    So much ... and much of it introduced to me by my wife. She brought the classical and baroque, I brought the jazz, blues, folk and rock and roll ...
  • Great list, @Gamma Gamaliel.

    RVW’s Mass in G Minor is a glimpse into heaven for me.

    And Elgar’s Cello Concerto in E Minor makes me long to play cello.

  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Nick Tamen - thanks for that. I thought they may have been.

    Gamma Gamaliel - Agree about the Bach cello suites. They are absolute masterpieces, go-to pieces of music no matter what your own mood. Will pick you up if you're down, calm you if you're anxious but dance with you in times of joy.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    edited August 28
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Great list, @Gamma Gamaliel.

    RVW’s Mass in G Minor is a glimpse into heaven for me.

    And Elgar’s Cello Concerto in E Minor makes me long to play cello.

    We still have the du Pré/Barbirolli LP of the Elgar I bought over 50 years ago with some grand-paternal birthday money, and it gets frequent outings. LP takes you back, doesn't it!
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Great list, @Gamma Gamaliel.

    RVW’s Mass in G Minor is a glimpse into heaven for me.

    And Elgar’s Cello Concerto in E Minor makes me long to play cello.

    We still have the du Pré/Barbirolli LP of the Elgar I bought over 50 years ago with some grand-paternal birthday money, and it gets frequent outings. LP takes you back, doesn't it!
    It does indeed. My LP goes back k around 30 years, with Yo-Yo Ma playing.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Great list, @Gamma Gamaliel.

    RVW’s Mass in G Minor is a glimpse into heaven for me.

    And Elgar’s Cello Concerto in E Minor makes me long to play cello.

    We still have the du Pré/Barbirolli LP of the Elgar I bought over 50 years ago with some grand-paternal birthday money, and it gets frequent outings. LP takes you back, doesn't it!

    I was fortunate enough to see Barenboim conduct du Pre in the Elgar at the Sydney Town Hall when they toured Australia - indeed over 50 years ago. The LP has Sea Pictures on the other side, and Janet Baker performed that in the same venue around about the same time. They may have been Youth Concerts - not sure, as my father worked at Sydney City Council, and I often used his entitlement to a staff seat for other concerts.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    What concerts they would have been. I have no recollection of either, so I must have missed them.
  • Gosh! Those must have been extraordinary concerts.

    Agreed on the Bach cello suites as suiting any mood, Gee Dee.

    I'm a Welshman and rather sentimental, so tend to go for things in the Minor Key. You get a lot of that in Welsh hymn tunes and in the repertoire of Welsh Male Voice Choirs.

    I wouldn't be the first to note parallels between Welsh and Russian hymnody.

    My late wife enjoyed Handel oratorios and opera - Acis and Galatea etc - as do I, as well as Mozart operas, but I also retain a softer spot than she did for 19th century Italian arias.

    Some French opera 'gets' me - Jussi Boerling (sp?) and John Merrill dueting on Bizet's 'Au fond du temple saint' from the otherwise unexceptional 'Pearl Fishers' sends me everytime but my wife could never understand the appeal.
  • Given the title of this thread, I feel compelled to mention “Come Healing,” by Leonard Cohen, of blessed memory. Sublime, profound poetry set to equally sublime, profound music. Perhaps not as well known as his “Hallelujah,” but as deeply healing for me as any song I know.

    For those who may not know it, Cohen singing it can be heard here. But I find this version particularly beautiful and prayerful.

  • The Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy ...
  • Indeed ...

    From a completely different angle, I've been thinking of music from the rock, pop and soul end of things that I find carry some kind of healing balm ...

    Someone mentioned Van Morrison's Astral Weeks. Yes, indeed and others of his albums too.

    Randomly, here are a few more thoughts ...

    Anything by Aretha Franklin.

    'Love will tear us apart' Joy Division

    'Heroes' David Bowie

    Oddly perhaps, both early Johnny Cash and some of his later covers - 'Hurt' particularly.

    Less viscerally but good for long drives, the whole 'Rumours' album by Fleetwood Mac.

    There are more.



  • Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Dreams‘ was the first song I fell in love with.

    Aretha Franklin’s ‘Mary, don’t you weep‘ is a long term favourite of mine.
  • SparrowSparrow Shipmate
    The Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy ...

    Is that the one with the fabulous Creed?
  • Indeed ...

    From a completely different angle, I've been thinking of music from the rock, pop and soul end of things that I find carry some kind of healing balm ...

    Someone mentioned Van Morrison's Astral Weeks. Yes, indeed and others of his albums too.

    Randomly, here are a few more thoughts ...

    Anything by Aretha Franklin.

    'Love will tear us apart' Joy Division

    'Heroes' David Bowie

    Oddly perhaps, both early Johnny Cash and some of his later covers - 'Hurt' particularly.

    Less viscerally but good for long drives, the whole 'Rumours' album by Fleetwood Mac.

    There are more.



    I love Fleetwood Mac ... and The Eagles ...
  • Sparrow wrote: »
    The Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy ...

    Is that the one with the fabulous Creed?

    The Orthodox Liturgies have EVERYTHING ... which is why they're not exactly short and quick
  • AnselminaAnselmina Shipmate
    Some great music here. Some I don't recognize and must try out. Going down a slightly different path, I've reached that sad stage in life where listening to the theme tunes of the kids' programmes I loved when I was growing up makes me feel emotional!

    Theme tune to the series 'Robinson Crusoe' always reminds me of Memories of Summer hols!

    And the theme from Belle and Sebastian.

    I'm even getting to the stage of getting weepy over themes from Thunderbirds and The Banana Splits!
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited August 30
    Anselmina wrote: »
    I'm even getting to the stage of getting weepy over themes from Thunderbirds and The Banana Splits!
    Ah, the Banana Splits theme song. Now that’s happiness to me.

  • That French 1964 version of Robinson Crusoe had a terrific score. I found it many years later on CD. I"be also got it on DVD.

    It certainly is 'healing'. When I was made redundant some years ago I found the incidental music where Crusoe starts to build his hut, make fishing spears and the like and begins to get to grips with life on the island very inspirational.

    My brother and I have a thing that if we are busy or working on something we start to sing it. Worky music.

    On the Fleetwood Mac thing ... I'm not a big fan of West Coast stuff like The Eagles etc but 'Rumours' is a classic album. Hardly a dud track.
  • Gosh! Those must have been extraordinary concerts.
    They were indeed! We had so many world-class performers who were brought to the country under the auspices of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Not just the capital cities either. After I moved to our little town, my wife and I were able to travel to Newcastle to attend concerts and recitals.
    I was a member of the subscribers' committee for a couple of years, and remember meeting the harpist Marisa Robles after her recital one mid-winter night, when she'd had to plunge her hands into a basin full of warm water during the interval.
    Divestment of the broadcaster's orchestras and subsequent reduction in touring programs means that we now rely upon recordings and radio broadcast for almost all of our music listening.
    Incidentally, I am not a pure classical listener - Sweet Honey in the Rock, Ella Fitzgerald, Norah Jones and lots of others in the jazz and folk genres make the playlist.
  • "Our Father," Gretchaninov
  • Incidentally, I am not a pure classical listener - Sweet Honey in the Rock . . . .
    Sweet Honey in the Rock is definitely healing music.

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