The chains of the Pleiades, the cords of Orion II

LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
Has anyone seen Venus and Mercury yesterday? I'm afraid I missed it.
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Comments

  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Oh, I didn't even read about this. Slipped off my radar.

    I have been enjoying the moon of late. Clear nights with it shining bright.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Yes we had some nice full moons lately!
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    edited March 2018
    Is there a galaxy without dark matter?


    edit: stuffed up that code!
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Climacus wrote: »
    Is there a galaxy without dark matter?edit: stuffed up that code!
    Yeah, I'd seen about that. To be honest, I'm still in two minds about this dark matter stuff. It seems to be a shorthand for "We haven't got a clue".

    The pictures of this galaxy are interesting. It's transparent; you can see other galaxies through it!
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    For some reason I recall watching Philip Pullman's interview last night. Dust. Or not.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Penny S wrote: »
    For some reason I recall watching Philip Pullman's interview last night. Dust. Or not.
    Was that on the BBC? What was it about?

  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Funny to have a full moon at Easter. And a nice one!
  • You are kidding, aren't you? There's always a full moon at Easter. It's the ultimate Easter Egg.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    RdrEmCofE wrote: »
    You are kidding, aren't you? There's always a full moon at Easter. It's the ultimate Easter Egg.
    By definition, there's always a full Moon in the week before Easter. By coincidence (well, statistically this happens every 7 years), it was on Saturday this year, so very close.

  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Yes, I found it interesting.

    And led, for some reason, to memories of me at 6 or 7 out on Christmas Eve looking for the star of Bethlehem and deciding the brightest one, probably Venus, must be it. I was disappointed it wasn't brighter.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Is everyone in their bunkers as Tiangong-1 prepares to hurtle to a fiery, or watery, grave?
  • Hiding in bunkers? When Skylab came down, folk simply donned appropriate PPE and went about their business.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    That's priceless! Thanks for sharing.
  • Tiangong 1 is reported to have reentered over the South Pacific at 5.16pm PST on Sunday. There are some videos on Youtube of it breaking up over Tahiti, but no reports of anyone being hit.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    I never thought of the sun as having siblings...

    An Australian-led team of galactic archaeologists is on a quest to find stars born at the same time and place as the Sun, and have mapped the chemical make-up of almost 350,000 stars, with the ultimate goal of shining a light on the Milky Way's history.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Climacus wrote: »
    An Australian-led team of galactic archaeologists is on a quest to find stars born at the same time and place as the Sun
    Wow, that's interesting. Many stars are born in star-burst regions. It's likely that this is the case of the Sun also, and that in 4.5 billion years they've drifted apart. Finding the others would tell us a lot about how stars move through the Milky Way.

    I also find this interesting. We're pretty sure that Proxima Centauri is the closest star to our Sun. If there was a closer one, we'd have seen it by now. But it is still possible that there are brown dwarfs (objects between a planet and a star) that are closer, and they're looking for them.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Beautiful very thin crescent Moon last night.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Indeed. It has been.in the western sky here early evening which means I get to see it shining brightly as I walk home from the supermarket.

    I really need to go outside the city one day soon to see the sky and Milky Way.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    ABC went for the obvious headline...

    Uranus smells like rotten eggs
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Climacus wrote: »
    ABC went for the obvious headline...

    Uranus smells like rotten eggs
    Yup. Why try to avoid it? :smile:

  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    I like the idea of sending a helicopter to Mars. Makes perfect sense to me.
  • WildHaggisWildHaggis Shipmate
    No way! Use that money to solve the problems we have here on earth.

    As a teenager I was hooked on astronomy and exploring space, but since I've discovered the amount of money used for impossible trips, and seeing the state of education, NHS, Mental Health facilities and the state of our roads, I no longer support the huge amount of money spent ans wasted on space travel.

    Better to read SF and use the money to help real people with real problems here on earth.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    edited May 2018
    (That's cool but I intended this Heaven thread to be about light-hearted discussion on Astronomical subjects. I can't really answer your post without becoming deeply Purgatorial. Therefore, could I ask people who wish to discuss "This money could be better spent on X" to open a thread in Purg?)
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    I had not heard about the helicopter option. Fascinating. Off to google...
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    For those of you in Australia, Stargazing Live starts tonight.
    Broadcasting over three nights from Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in NSW, the series will immerse the audience in a celebration of the night sky, with a focus on features that are best experienced from Australian soil.

    Looking forward to it. And, bolshie hat on, this is what public broadcasters do best, bolshie hat off.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Cool! Let me know if you've learned something interesting.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    LOL, if you're looking for a holiday idea: a Zeppelin around Venus. Sure, if you're high enough, temperature and pressure should be Earth-like. I'm not so sure about naming it HAVOC though …
  • Golden KeyGolden Key Shipmate
    Climacus wrote: »
    Looking forward to it. And, bolshie hat on, this is what public broadcasters do best, bolshie hat off.

    Also Stardate, which I hear on NPR. There's audio available on the site.

  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    By the way, here's a picture I took of the Moon and Venus over the sea last Friday. I didn't think I'd be able to catch them with my phone, it came out better than I thought.

    In the coming weekend, we'll have Jupiter close to the waxing gibbous Moon. I wonder how visible the planet will be in the Moon's glare.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    edited May 2018
    That's a great photo - thanks for sharing. I was staring at the moon again as I walked home from the shops just then. I find it captivating - reminds me of verse 1 of this, I suppose. That poem spoke to me at one stage in a depressed state, not the author's malady.

    The Stargazing show is great. Nothing earth-shattering yet, but lots of great explanations on the sun and the solar system, a fascinating scale look at the solar system [I was reminded of this], and they helped a family in Melbourne set up and use their telescope that they were having trouble with -- the kids were overjoyed.

    Brian Cox is great as the informed scientist, as is Space Gandalf and Prof Lisa Harvey-Smith, and ABC's own Julia and Kumi are wonderful as always. As are the others whose names I have forgotten.

    I'll be tuning in for Night 2 in just under 10 minutes.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Last night 1,000,000 images were viewed and a new supernova discovered.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-23/stargazing-live-discovers-new-supernova/9793264

    That's pretty exciting!
  • RdrEmCofERdrEmCofE Shipmate
    Climacus wrote: »
    Indeed. It has been.in the western sky here early evening which means I get to see it shining brightly as I walk home from the supermarket.

    I really need to go outside the city one day soon to see the sky and Milky Way.

    Try the middle of The Indian Ocean. Amazing! Moonless night but could see by the light of The Milky Way. Couldn't put a pin between the stars.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Amazing! Wow.


    New record set in stargazing:
    https://twitter.com/i/moments/999748122946355200
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    For anyone wanting to look up in the sky, try these star maps.

    Your local observatory may publish them too: here is one from Sydney's observatory.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    I like images like this; a reminder the universe is not fixed, but each body moves.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    edited June 2018
    RdrEmCofE wrote: »
    Try the middle of The Indian Ocean.
    That sounds fab.

    Climacus wrote: »
    Heh, cool. It's always good to get more people looking up.

    Climacus wrote: »
    For anyone wanting to look up in the sky, try these star maps.
    Yup, good idea. Venus (in the West after sunset) and Jupiter (almost on top of you around midnight) are still putting up a show. I recommend everyone to take a look!

    Climacus wrote: »
    I like images like this; a reminder the universe is not fixed, but each body moves.
    Nice. We can see motion even in some stars and planetary nebulae if we look long enough.


    Meanwhile, Curiosity has discovered organic molecules on Mars!! (NYTimes link, maybe you only get a couple of articles for free every month.)
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Another picture I took recently. Below, the lights of the city where I live. At the top, Jupiter.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Very nice! Thanks for sharing.

    It does amaze me we can see planets so far away, seeing their reflected sunlight (?). Then I think if stars in other galaxies. Wow.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Climacus wrote: »
    Nice! Globular clusters are always beautiful. And important to study because they're so old.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    edited July 2018
    Indeed.

    Astronomers say they have captured the first confirmed image of a planet forming in the dust swirling around a young star.

    Though this reads wrong to me:
    The star is 370 light-years from Earth – roughly equivalent to the distance between Uranus and our sun.
    I'm guessing they mean the distance between this new planet and its star is the same as between the Sun and Uranus.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    Climacus wrote: »
    I'm guessing they mean the distance between this new planet and its star is the same as between the Sun and Uranus.
    Yup. I'm excited that they saw a planet being born.


    I understand that 5 planets will be visible in July. And a lunar eclipse on the 27th, visible in most of Europe.
  • LeRoc wrote: »
    I understand that 5 planets will be visible in July. And a lunar eclipse on the 27th, visible in most of Europe.

    Five of our sun's planets, you mean?
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    Five of our sun's planets, you mean?
    Sorry, yes. Venus brightly in the West after sunset (you can already see it very well). Mercury also close to the Sun. Saturn rising in the East after sunset, with Mars just behind it. Jupiter right above you around midnight.

    I'm hoping to catch Mercury, I've never really seen it.
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    The Sun is at its furthest today.
    With regards to seeing Mercury, be absolutely sure the Sun is down and then scan with binoculars. It will probably be higher up than you expect. If you can see Venus, probably on a rough line between it and the place the Sun disappeared. Once found with glasses, it should be easy to find with the naked eye, and bright enough to mistake for a plane, possibly. We have a flight path in the direction, but it doesn't move!
  • RdrEmCofERdrEmCofE Shipmate
    Climacus wrote: »
    Indeed.

    Astronomers say they have captured the first confirmed image of a planet forming in the dust swirling around a young star.

    Though this reads wrong to me:
    The star is 370 light-years from Earth – roughly equivalent to the distance between Uranus and our sun.
    I'm guessing they mean the distance between this new planet and its star is the same as between the Sun and Uranus.

    It's not their facts that are wrong. It's their command of the English Language. Most of us knew what they meant though. I wonder what the frequency of Uranus' orbit would be if it was 370 light years from the sun? A much longer wait than for most comets.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    A distant, violent black hole called a blazar
    For the first time, astrophysicists have traced a single neutrino from beyond our galaxy all the way back to its source: an active supermassive black hole called a blazar, some 4 billion light-years away.



    The work is vital to help develop a new way of doing astronomy which uses neutrinos instead of light.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    They detected this neutrino, and they know where it came from. That's barrier-breaking science.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    Indeed. To be unscientific, it blows my mind.
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