Et in spiritum: the not-WINE drinks thread

FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
Rather than clutter up In Vino etc, a separate shelf for distillates of all kinds, liqueurs, aperitifs and all the other fun things that come in bottles.

First up, Lambay Whiskey: not actually distilled on the little speck of land off the coast of Dublin, but using water from the spring and, the really interesting bit, finished in Cognac casks.

Which gives it an affinity with my current favourite brandy - Île de Ré (off La Rochelle).

We have also, chez Firenze, been somewhat drinking our way round the Hebrides via gins from Raasay and Harris.

Anyone else find themselves with a themed drinks cupboard?
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Comments

  • I got into spirits when 'courting', and duty-free was available while shuttling from Manchester to Dublin. Jamesons isn't fancy, but I quite like it. Well, it's fancier than Paddy I guess.
  • We're getting more local whiskies, which means the same palate as scotch, but generally have never been called scotch. The ones made from rye are called rye here. Malting barley locally grown is used for beer more than spirits locally, and is very fine. It's all going the way of local micro or nano breweries. Some of these nano distillery products are very fine and exceed the internationally marketted ones both in taste and price point. We've basically given up on imported Scotches for both reasons. Anywhere with good grain and people with skills can make excellent whiskies, scotches and ryes, at about 50% of the cost. I suspect this is transportation costs and thinking local is less climate change. There are some bourbons (corn based I think mostly) but locally to us, not so much.

    I like a smokey drink sometimes, and a casked or non-peaty non-smokey others. It's a mood and what the day's experience has been thing. I'm continually experimenting with adding a wee bit of water, which argument has it loosens and releases flavour. I don't know though, if I have more than a small glass I think taste buds get overloaded and I cannot really tell. People get fussy about the water, I am more fussy about water for tea myself. But no ice cubes please.
  • Port can be alright. I took communion once at a church that used port. It was quite a change from our unfermented Methodist grape juice.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Port can be amazing. A friend once cracked out for a birthday dinner a bottle which, like himself, dated from the 1940s.

    But the place to drink port is in Portugal to see what the fuss is about.
  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    Bourbon is my tipple of preference, being raised on it from a young age (which is a story for another time), although I do enjoy a good rye every now and then as well.

    "Bourbon Whiskey" (with the e spelling) was recognized by the U.S. Congress in 1964 as being a "distinctive product of the United States" and requiring that only bourbon made in the United States could be called bourbon. In case you are interested, the requirements are as follows:
    1. It must be made of a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn. The remainder of the mash bill is where different bourbons get different taste profiles--using rye, wheat, more corn, etc.
    2. It must be aged in new charred oak barrels---no reusing old Port barrels for bourbon!
    3. Bourbon may not be introduced into the barrel at more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol) and it may not be distilled to more than 160 proof (80% alcohol)
    4. To be called "Straight Bourbon" it must be aged a minimum of two years.
    5. Any bourbon aged for less than 4 years must state the age on the label (as a practical matter, if it is aged for more than 4 years, you can bet the maker will be bragging on the label about how long it has been aged even though it is not required)
    6. "Bonded" bourbon has another set of requirements--it is essentially a purity statement--and must be 100 proof (50% alcohol).
    Sadly, my very favorite "top shelf" bourbon (Very Special Old Fitzgerald--12 year old, 90 proof) is no longer being made. I used to love the whole Old Fitzgerald line, but it went under. The name has been revived recently, but the bourbon just isn't the same (and they quadrupled the price).

    Blanton's is wonderful, but that is getting hard to find as well.

    Since the passing of Old Fitz, my everyday "table" bourbon is Ancient Age (80 proof): Affordable, and it can be drunk neat or used in mixed drinks. If you want to put ice in it, go ahead. It is not so good that you are going to hurt it. But it is still good enough that you don't mind drinking it by itself.


  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Principal Bourbon memory: we're in Santa Fe and Mr F has dental trouble. The hotel arrange an appointment with a local 'dental artist' who sorts it. In the grateful aftermath we make (through an April snowstorm) to the local liquor mart and buy a bottle of Woodforde Reserve. After Santa Fe we go visit friends in New Haven, which involves the Drive From Hell in a hire car from Newark. We give them the bourbon and they sensibly pour it back into us.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Hedgehog wrote: »
    Bourbon is my tipple of preference . . . .
    And mine. I’m really not too fussy about brand. I rarely go for anything top shelf—I’m rarely if ever going to spend that kind of money on myself. College (and a college budget) gave me a fondness for plain ol’ Jim Beam that I’ve never lost, and I can be quite happy with a mid-shelf Maker’s Mark.

    Someone gave me a bottle of Blade and Bow small batch when I retired. I’m looking forward to opening that.

  • MarthaMartha Shipmate
    edited March 31
    Port can be alright. I took communion once at a church that used port. It was quite a change from our unfermented Methodist grape juice.

    Yes, I have an abiding memory of taking communion at an Anglican church for the first time, having grown up Baptist. After the service I turned to my acquaintance and said, 'What was that stuff?'

    'Oh, some kind of fortified wine,' she responded off-handedly, obviously totally used to it.

    I'm not big on the strong stuff, but we tend to have dry sherry in the house. And my husband has got into limoncello. Too sweet for me!
  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    College (and a college budget) gave me a fondness for plain ol’ Jim Beam that I’ve never lost, and I can be quite happy with a mid-shelf Maker’s Mark.
    I sometimes treat myself to Jim Beam Black Label. That is quite enjoyable neat. I would not insult it by mixing it with anything.

  • RuthRuth Shipmate
    Another Jim Beam fan here - it's a staple, both for sipping and hot toddies. I also buy Finlaggan at Trader Joe's - an Islay single malt repackaged under the TJ's label and sold for 20 bucks. It's smoky and wonderful, and I always marvel at how amazing it is to get excellent scotch at that price.
    https://malt-review.com/2021/02/04/trader-joes-scotch-whiskies/

    A small distillery finally opened in town a few years ago, and we've been shelling out for their rather pricey but exceedingly good vodka and gin during the pandemic, reasoning that there's been little else to spend money on and we're supporting a local business. They're working on whiskey, but it's too soon for them to sell any.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Ruth wrote: »
    I also buy Finlaggan at Trader Joe's . . . .
    Not an option here, I’m afraid. Ours is a state of government-run liquor stores; no liquor for sale in groceries or other stores.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    Rye drinker here. I find it more pleasant and less likely to be harsh than other whisk(e)ys.
  • Dark navy rum for me. There's a pub not that far away that has over 100 varieties of rum. Lovely.

    When in the UK, we had access to a number of sloe bushes, so we used to pick oodles of sloes and created sloe gin. The longer you can keep the sloes steeping in the gin, the better.
  • Port is currently being used here for the communion at home (free church).

    My usual spirit is gin; my favourite gin is Japanese Suntory Roku but I have lots of gins. Some of the commercial flavoured ones are far too sweet but my husband bought me a lovely pink gin Mirabeau flavoured with wine and flowers, and there’s a nice Kew botanical gin. I’ve been meaning to try some Scottish ones and the opening post may have convinced me to order some.
    I also make homemade flavoured gin, either with sloes or by adding frozen soft fruit.

    If I drink whisky it is usually something peaty like Laphroig or another Islay malt. Husband has a whisky collection which includes several Japanese, Swedish and Welsh whiskies.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    When in the UK, we had access to a number of sloe bushes, so we used to pick oodles of sloes and created sloe gin. The longer you can keep the sloes steeping in the gin, the better.

    Reminds me, I have raspberries steeping in gin for what must be at least two years. Keep meaning to strain off the liquor and dilute with plain gin. Keep drinking the bottle bought for this purpose (because cocktails).
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    We ordered a bottle of Armagnac for Christmas. The seller relieved us of a significant amount of money, and then the Armagnac never came. Three months and a consumer association complaint later, we finally got our money back, and a bottle of the good stuff from 1973 (the year of husband en rouge's birth*) was delivered this morning.

    I think we will toast the resurrection with it on Sunday.

    *I still consider it deeply unfair that when he ordered a bottle from the year of my birth, I was up the duff and didn't even get to drink it.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    And I finally got round to pouring off the raspberry gin. I find a glug added to fresh citrus juice over ice makes a very adequate aperitif.
  • Firenze wrote: »
    Port can be amazing. A friend once cracked out for a birthday dinner a bottle which, like himself, dated from the 1940s.

    But the place to drink port is in Portugal to see what the fuss is about.
    Having lived there, I couldn't agree more. At least buy your Port from a Portuguese store (there are a few dotted around Britain).

  • Some years ago, I got to know a local Serbian Orthodox priest and so got invited to a number of their celebrations. Through this, I was introduced to Serbian Slivovitz - a plum brandy. I know that you can get it in many countries across eastern Europe but my Serb friends only drank genuine Serbian slivovitz, which they brought back to the UK every time someone visited Serbia. I have tried other slivovitzs but I must say that I am very partial to the Serbian when I can get my hands on it.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Whereas I first came across the Czech version, which, sadly, have not been able to get these years.

    Another thing I pine for is Himbeergeist. Of all the fruit-based eaux de vie it's my favourite.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    ... I took communion once at a church that used port ...
    At an ordination service in Belfast Cathedral many moons ago, the Bishop consecrated enough British Port for 500, but only about half of that took communion. This left the verger, one of the retired canons and David and me to drink three chalices of the stuff between us (and they don't dilute it in the Church of Ireland).

    I probably had most of it, as the others had to drive home. David reckoned the fact that none of them got stopped by the police* was proof that God is an Anglican. :mrgreen:

    * it was in the days when there could be random checks any time.
  • I’ve had Romanian Slivovitz, given to my other half by a work colleague.
  • Fawkes CatFawkes Cat Shipmate
    Piglet wrote: »
    ... I took communion once at a church that used port ...
    At an ordination service in Belfast Cathedral many moons ago, the Bishop consecrated enough British Port for 500, but only about half of that took communion. This left the verger, one of the retired canons and David and me to drink three chalices of the stuff between us (and they don't dilute it in the Church of Ireland).

    I probably had most of it, as the others had to drive home. David reckoned the fact that none of them got stopped by the police* was proof that God is an Anglican. :mrgreen:

    * it was in the days when there could be random checks any time.

    I have been advised of the following exchange at the altar following some over-consecration of wine:

    Celebrant to retired priest assisting: Can you drink the wine? I've got to drive home.
    Retired Priest Assisting: How do you think I got here? Pogo stick?
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited April 2
    A similar thing happened to me when I got roped in to acting as server for a funeral in St. John's. The Dean consecrated an appropriate quantity of wine and administered the wafers, but when he turned round with the chalice, the communicants had all buggered off. Apparently the deceased had nominally been an Anglican, but all his friends and relations were Roman Catholics.

    The Dean whispered to me, "you'll have to reverently consume - I've got a meeting with the Bishop after this". I didn't like to point out that I had to manoeuvre a large processional cross down one aisle and up the other in a straight line ...

    David (bless him) was watching the whole proceedings from the organ console, and trying not to crease himself with laughter.
  • I’ve had Romanian Slivovitz, given to my other half by a work colleague.
    My wife has had it, but much prefers the Hungarian version.

  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    Firenze wrote: »
    Port can be amazing. A friend once cracked out for a birthday dinner a bottle which, like himself, dated from the 1940s.

    But the place to drink port is in Portugal to see what the fuss is about.
    Having lived there, I couldn't agree more. At least buy your Port from a Portuguese store (there are a few dotted around Britain).

    I like port and sort of regret not trying more of them when we were actually in Lisbon for a week a few years ago (though we did wander into the basement of the Port Institute for a nice glass of tawny one evening).

    I’m also fond of Scotch though making some concession to my wallet (and my liver) I rarely buy it (usually as gifts for Scotch-drinking friends these days).

  • I’ve had Romanian Slivovitz, given to my other half by a work colleague.

    Ah, I'd forgotten about the stuff the Poles make, and you reminded me. Generally it's about 90% by volume if they make it themselves - and in Poland you can cheat and buy 90% (vol) 'rectified spirit' in the shops. The DIY bit better stay as 'happening in Poland' for HMRC purposes, though they assure me if you do it right you're not likely to pull off anything toxic. Splashing out for refined sugar (more expensive than, for example, potatoes) on which to base the inital brew is a good idea so as to be certain what you start with in the mix, and 'turbo yeast' makes a stronger brew to, err, start with.

    Then they let it down to about 50% with water, fruit juice etc etc. I like it, generally, but I don't know enough about drinking to give you any points of reference - similar other drinks - for comparison. They do like to finish the bottle at one sitting, which is a little alarming until you get used to it.

    Incidentally, I spoke to someone working at Jamesons years ago, who told me all their spirit comes off the still at 93%. That means all the flaviour is in the 7%, and the barrels they use to age it in. It's surprising you can taste such a difference, and disappointing to my Luddite side - I'd like to enjoy Co-op rough stuff as much as something pricey, and it offends my sense of inverted snobbery, that I don't.

  • Marsupial wrote: »
    I’m also fond of Scotch though making some concession to my wallet (and my liver) I rarely buy it (usually as gifts for Scotch-drinking friends these days).
    My wife also likes it although her current favourite is actually Welsh! https://tinyurl.com/y3bnyfcm

  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Hands up those of you own a cocktail shaker.

    Or if you don't make your own, do you have a favourite when you're out partying (remember that?)

    Saturday is Cocktail Hour chez Firenze. I have just put the glasses to chill. The recipe books are a bit vintage - the most recent was published in the 80s.
  • We own a cocktail shaker and it is regularly used as my husband likes to do these things ‘properly’. We also have umbrellas and pretty stirrers/sticks but they are more my idea of doing things ‘properly’ and he tolerates them. We also have a wide range of cocktail glasses in various styles 🍸
    By far the most popular cocktail for me is the rather modern espresso martini.
    Perhaps I should suggest a cocktail hour to Mr HA.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Glasses are invariably the classic triangular ones. No swizzle sticks or umbrellas but it must have a cherry (unless it's a dry Martini) and usually a slice of citrus fruit.

    The mark of a good cocktail is that it doesn't taste of any of its ingredients but delivers a taste that transcends them. The exception here is probably the dry Martini again, which is all about the gin.
  • We invented a cocktail, once. It's called the Vicar's Knickers. Equal amounts of gin, spiced rum and amaretto, with a squeeze of lime. Served with ice.

    On the night we invented it, four of us cleared the pub's entire stock of gin.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Marsupial wrote: »
    I’m also fond of Scotch though making some concession to my wallet (and my liver) I rarely buy it (usually as gifts for Scotch-drinking friends these days).
    My wife also likes it although her current favourite is actually Welsh! https://tinyurl.com/y3bnyfcm

    Baswn i caru'n ei drio, ond does dim gen i digon o arian / I'd love to try it but I don't have that sort of money.
  • RicardusRicardus Shipmate
    When I lived in the Czech Republic I was introduced to Becherovka, which (to quote Terry Pratchett) is 'made from herbs ... well, mainly from herbs' (although 'mainly from alcohol' might be more accurate), and which is used to cure all infirmities.

    Re slivovitz: IIRC there is a whole range of spirits whose names are formed as [name of fruit]+ovice, all of which are worth drinking, although probably with a small glass ...
  • KarlLB wrote: »
    My wife also likes it although her current favourite is actually Welsh! https://tinyurl.com/y3bnyfcm

    Baswn i caru'n ei drio, ond does dim gen i digon o arian / I'd love to try it but I don't have that sort of money.[/quote] It was my Christmas present to her!

  • I find deep contentment in Islay single malts, most particularly Lagavulin when sipped slowly, accompanying a good book. However, a Danish friend introduced me to what could not be more different, Danish aquavit (or akvavit), taken straight back. In moderation, it imbues a feeling of well-being without inebriation, and it is not unheard of to begin the day with it at breakfast, as we discovered when visiting him in Newfoundland not long ago.
  • Ricardus wrote: »
    When I lived in the Czech Republic I was introduced to Becherovka, which (to quote Terry Pratchett) is 'made from herbs ... well, mainly from herbs' (although 'mainly from alcohol' might be more accurate), and which is used to cure all infirmities.

    Re slivovitz: IIRC there is a whole range of spirits whose names are formed as [name of fruit]+ovice, all of which are worth drinking, although probably with a small glass ...

    Ah, Becherovka. A friend and I travelled in (then) Czechoslovakia. Great people. Great food. Pretty good wine. A Czech friend warned us that one or two Becher after dinner was a good idea, but more that that, not so much. My Canadian friend had rather more than he could tolerate. The following day I had to reregister us with the Communist police (a day late!) because of our change of address. I had to do it alone because of the friend's Becher-flu. I explained it, in a fruit salad of languages, to the officer's amusement. We got our extension.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Which brings us the Slovenian Brinjevec. Tastes like a cross between creosote and washing-up liquid, but, by gum, does it cure nausea.
  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    I find deep contentment in Islay single malts, most particularly Lagavulin when sipped slowly, accompanying a good book. However, a Danish friend introduced me to what could not be more different, Danish aquavit (or akvavit), taken straight back. In moderation, it imbues a feeling of well-being without inebriation, and it is not unheard of to begin the day with it at breakfast, as we discovered when visiting him in Newfoundland not long ago.

    Aquavit reminds me of my Danish great-grandfather, who would always have it on hand to serve to my parents when we visited my great-grandparents. He lived to be almost 100, and so I was old enough to bring him a bottle of something when I was visiting him myself in his later years, but by then his tastes had mellowed to Sandeman Ruby port.

  • This brings to mind a strange linguistic quirk. I had a nanny who was from Friuli, as was her husband. On occasion, for any number of reasons, I would stay overnight at their place. (Most frequently it was because one, the other, or both of my parents was in an out of town bonspiel.) Husband of the nanny had to be at the mine around 6.30am and in winter would often have a shot with his coffee before heading out into the -25ºC. In most of Italy the akvavit-like hooch is "grappa". In the Friulan language, it shows the germanic influence - "schn(i)appa".
  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    For my birthday last year, my brother gave me a book on making bitters. Basically, this involves making a number of tinctures of herbs and spices. The challenge comes in combining them to make a worthwhile bitters.

    Making tinctures is simple. Basically you put a quantity of the herb or spice you want in a jar, and then cover it with 150-proof alcohol (roughly speaking, about a third to a half over the level of the herb/spice) and then set it aside to soak for a couple weeks or so. Then strain.

    I followed the book for a recipe of "Winter" bitters, which required tinctures of cinnamon, birch bark, clove, bitter orange peel, allspice and rosemary. After I made the batch of Winter Bitters, I had a quantity of tinctures left over. I experimented with making a few simple combinations (e.g., bitter orange with some birch to soften the bitterness; and a cinnamon-clove blend) but I am afraid more complex mixtures are beyond my skill level. For example, I have no idea what to do with the remaining rosemary tincture as it is quite disgusting by itself added to a whiskey. It might have some use in Very Small Quantities in a Bloody Mary, but as I don't often drink those, it is not much use to me.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Bitters are one of those things I would only get from a trusted source, since a very little can have such an impact on a drink. We have orange, grapefruit, Peychaud and Angostura.

    A favourite aperitif is a vermouth (usually dry) over ice with a squeeze of citrus and a dash of bitters.
  • Firenze wrote: »
    Which brings us the Slovenian Brinjevec. Tastes like a cross between creosote and washing-up liquid, but, by gum, does it cure nausea.
    My wife likes a strange Hungarian concoction called Zwack Unicum which looks like a cross between creosote, washing-up liquid and Marmite (the bottle has a passing resemblance too).

    I think it's one of those things you buy at the airport on the way home to give to your least-favourite relative the next Christmas.

  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    Firenze wrote: »
    Bitters are one of those things I would only get from a trusted source, since a very little can have such an impact on a drink. We have orange, grapefruit, Peychaud and Angostura.
    Once I started making my own blends, I decided to convert an old spice rack into a bitters rack: bottom row for the home brew; the upper row for the store-bought. That row currently has Angostura, Lemon, Cherry and "Jerry Thomas' Own Decanter" (a personal favorite).

  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    Marsupial wrote: »
    I’m also fond of Scotch though making some concession to my wallet (and my liver) I rarely buy it (usually as gifts for Scotch-drinking friends these days).
    My wife also likes it although her current favourite is actually Welsh! https://tinyurl.com/y3bnyfcm
    I bought a bottle of Penderyn Legend tonight. Quite a complicated taste (finished in Madeira casks), but very pleasant.

    In the bourbon realm, Old Forester is interesting to see how small differences can change a whiskey. Every Old Forester bourbon uses the exact same mash bill (the blend of grains used). The different varieties come from what happens next:

    (1) Basic Old Forester: 86 proof (43% abv)
    (2) 1920 Prohibition Style: 115 proof (57.5% abv)
    (3) 1910 Style: 93 proof (46.5 abv)--made by taking the bourbon and putting it into a second cask, adding extra sweetness.
    (4) 1897 Style: Bottled-In-Bond, 100 proof (50% abv)
    (5) 1870 Style: A bit complicated: the batch is made of three barrels, each barrel from a different warehouse, different proof and different age.
    (6) President's Choice: literally, the company president's choice of a barrel, usually about 8 years old and 110 to 120 proof (55 to 60 abv)
    (7) Statesman: 95 proof (47.5 abv), taken from barrels in the warmest place in the warehouse
    (8) Birthday: Again, variable, but usually 10 years old and circa 98 proof (49 abv)

    So the same mash bill, but a lot of different tastes depending on strength, age, and other factors.

    The references to warehouses reminds me of a legend (connected to my long-lost favorite, Old Fitzgerald) where a reporter saw an empty warehouse and assumed that its barrels had recently shipped. Then he looked again and noticed a bunch of cobwebs: the warehouse had long been disused. The Master Distiller explained calmly: "That warehouse made bad bourbon." Things like temperature, light, etc. can affect the final product. Some warehouses make bad bourbon!

  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    [tangent] There have been comments about communion wine. We used to go to a Baptist church which used individual glasses. For various reasons, we ere usually there early, so ended up settling up the cups. The “wine” came in a plastic Gerry can with the legend “Not for beverage usage”. [\tangent]
  • AnselminaAnselmina Shipmate
    Port can be alright. I took communion once at a church that used port. It was quite a change from our unfermented Methodist grape juice.

    I had a church (in Co. Cork) that regularly used an Amontillado bought from Lidl by the wardens. During a clergy fraternal we had a communion-wine tasting session (for serious research purposes!) to find out which was best across all those used by other ministers in their parishes. It was the Lidl product that came out on top. Scoring way above even the church supplier altar wines.
  • AnselminaAnselmina Shipmate
    As for whisky/whiskeys, I enjoy single malts and some blends. I do have a soft spot for Bushmills single malt. It has such a distinctively different honey smoothness to it, compared to the peaty, smokiness of the Scotch whiskies.
  • Yesterday I gave in to a veritable blitzkrieg of Facebook ads and got a bottle of Westward American Single Malt Whiskey (because it is made in Oregon). I was impressed--it's really distinctive. It doesn't taste like bourbon, or Scotch, or Irish, or Canadian, but it's very smooth with complex caramel, vanilla, honey, and spice flavors without seeming sweet.
  • Firenze wrote: »
    Principal Bourbon memory: we're in Santa Fe and Mr F has dental trouble. The hotel arrange an appointment with a local 'dental artist' who sorts it. In the grateful aftermath we make (through an April snowstorm) to the local liquor mart and buy a bottle of Woodforde Reserve. After Santa Fe we go visit friends in New Haven, which involves the Drive From Hell in a hire car from Newark. We give them the bourbon and they sensibly pour it back into us.

    Was bourbon not once prescribed for toothach by Humphrey Bogart? Was it in To Have and to Hold? He recommended that the afflicted hold a shot of bourbon against the tooth, swallow, and then repeat as often as necessary.
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