Toilet Seats Up or Down?

2

Comments

  • Boogie wrote: »
    Why?

    Floaters?

    Huh?
  • Floating turds that refuse to flush.

    You did ask.
  • Those are more common with some older types of toilet with a sharper bend in the pipe. Our upstairs toilet is new but our downstairs toilet isn’t. The downstairs toilet is mainly used for cat poo (as carrying the litter tray upstairs is asking for trouble) but doesn’t always flush it very successfully.
  • Boogie wrote: »
    Telford wrote: »
    I get told off if I leave the seat up. I flush with the lid down but I raise it as soon as the flush has finished.

    Why?

    Mrs Telford likes to have the toilet ready for use.
  • I’m another for whom the seat question is irrelevant as the only valid state in which to leave the toilet is “lid down”*.

    There was recently an advert for some house perfume or other that went on about how much stinky stuff gets sprayed around the room when you flush. And every.single.time I would shout “not if you close the fucking lid” at the screen.

    .

    *= I will note for the record that on some very rare occasions I have encountered toilets that don’t even have a lid at all. But very few of those indeed were in civilised places.
  • *= I will note for the record that on some very rare occasions I have encountered toilets that don’t even have a lid at all. But very few of those indeed were in civilised places.

    The vasty vast majority of lids in restaurants, stores, parks, etc. in this country have no lid. I tend to flush them with my foot after I've washed up and hurry out the door.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    The vasty vast majority of lids in restaurants, stores, parks, etc. in this country have no lid. I tend to flush them with my foot after I've washed up and hurry out the door.

    How do you flush a loo with your foot? Offhand, I can't think of any I've seen that would allow that.

    I'll leave your first sentence for others to be cruel.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    The vasty vast majority of lids in restaurants, stores, parks, etc. in this country have no lid. I tend to flush them with my foot after I've washed up and hurry out the door.

    How do you flush a loo with your foot? Offhand, I can't think of any I've seen that would allow that.
    Most toilets in public restrooms in the US, at least in my experience, are either flushed by a motion detector that “knows” when you’ve gotten up, or have a lever on the pipe like this one. I regularly flush those with my foot. It does involve lifting your leg up, but otherwise not hard at all.

  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    edited September 2021
    Right - some here are like that, but I'd be wary of lifting my leg up to operate that. I'm glad to say that the automatic operation does not seem to have taken off here. You are washing your hands after.
  • Like @Nick Tamen, I flush those with my foot. The lever is closer to foot height than it is to hand height.

    Mind you, I have also been known to open doors with my foot if my hands were full, and that's a bit more athletic, given that doorknobs are at roughly waist height.
  • I understand the appeal of not touching these things with your hands--but you know that probably the greater part of the world does so after you've had your feet all over them???? maybe a compromise, like using toilet paper? Because I sort of feel like I need to wash now (yes, I DO wash after peeing, it's the mental thing that's doing me in).
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    edited September 2021
    I understand the appeal of not touching these things with your hands--but you know that probably the greater part of the world does so after you've had your feet all over them????

    Then they immediately wash their hands. So what? Or if they don't immediately wash their hands, my foot is the least of their worries.
  • Ewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    No, I meant standing up, but maybe it was garbled. If there’s even one person in the house who sits to pee, those who stand to pee should, as a matter of basic courtesy, lower the seat when they’re done.

    Can you not say that the person who sits down should, as a matter of basic courtesy, raise the seat when they're done?

    If you do so, you are assuming that the next person along will be a man who needs to pee only. What if it's another woman? What if it's a guy who needs to poop? Wiggle as you may, you can't get out of the logic on this one.

    (There's also the fact that on average women need to be in there taking care of business more often then men. Note that "on average." That's because some of us will be pregnant and desperate for a pee every six seconds, and others of us will be on our periods and obliged to deal with matters whether our bladders are full or not. Some of us every hour or two, depending.)

    Driving the American Interstate System, the number of rest areas on the freeway can vary greatly between states. Some states will have rest areas every 60 miles while other states will have up to two hours between rest areas. I honestly think the states that have them every sixty miles (or less) have women on the engineering panel while those with longer gaps have mostly men on their design groups.
  • Reminds me of the bit in Dodie Smith's "I Capture the Castle", when the family first when to view the castle they came to live in, they found a text in the bathroom above the loo reading "Hold thou me up, and I shall be safe".
  • BoogieBoogie Heaven Host
    If it’s brown, flush it down. If it’s yellow, let it mellow.

    Saves water.

    So, seat and lid down, every flush.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    I'm having flashbacks of a very long ago thread on toilet paper usage.
    ;)
  • ...or in my house, flush it every damn time, because the sewer pipes are 50% past their rated lifespan, and tree roots are intruding, and we cannot afford the multi-thousand dollar cost just now of ripping up the basement and front lawn to replace 130 year old pipes. So if you don't want it to, er, get stuck, flush.
  • Boogie wrote: »
    If it’s brown, flush it down. If it’s yellow, let it mellow.

    Saves water.

    So, seat and lid down, every flush.

    Also stains the toilet in my experience
  • LatchKeyKidLatchKeyKid Purgatory Host
    Boogie wrote: »
    If it’s brown, flush it down. If it’s yellow, let it mellow.

    Saves water.

    So, seat and lid down, every flush.

    We do this when the tank is getting low and no rain forecast for quite a while.

    But leaving the lid down after a flush leaves a smell to greet you when the lid is next raised, so I would say raise the lid straight after the flush.
  • Never had the problem when I as young. The toilet had no lid and the flusher was on a long chain. It was inside though
  • I reckon the high level cistern must have added some energy to the water on its descent, thus aiding the flush.
  • Penny S wrote: »
    I reckon the high level cistern must have added some energy to the water on its descent, thus aiding the flush.

    It sure did.
  • Ethne AlbaEthne Alba Shipmate
    edited October 2021
    I could get nostalgic for those old toilet cisterns



    But not the spiders that descended upon the unwary…..



    Oh and Down. Please. Nearly finished off my back one year while also heavily pregnant. The guest left the lid and seat up and at 2am I am not at my most observant…..
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Ethne Alba wrote: »
    I could get nostalgic for those old toilet cisterns



    But not the spiders that descended upon the unwary…..



    Oh and Down. Please. Nearly finished off my back one year while also heavily pregnant. The guest left the lid and seat up and at 2am I am not at my most observant…..

    Watch out for the redback spiders underneath the seat.
  • [Yet one more reason to remain on this side of the world! I d be no good in your neck of of the woods, too many scary creatures!]
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    And both Australia's red back and White tailed spiders have managed to hitchhike across the ditch - which is a bit scary. When I was a child katipo spiders were the only dangerous ones, but they were fairly rare.
  • LatchKeyKidLatchKeyKid Purgatory Host
    Ethne Alba wrote: »
    [Yet one more reason to remain on this side of the world! I d be no good in your neck of of the woods, too many scary creatures!]

    I haven't regretted my move from the UK. In 44 years I have seen Redbacks only a few times, and under chairs, not toilet seats. Pythons I do not find scary and the Whipsnake is so scared of us. Mosquitos seem to prefer others, but the "blood of an (this) Englishman".
  • Flush with seat and lid down, because of aerosols...and cats. I don't want to have to rescue a drowned or semi-drowned kitten fro the toilet, thank you.

    But, back in 1997, it was my OH's practice to leave the seat raised. He simply couldn't see the necessity for it to be down.
    Until, one night, I needed to go. I didn't put any lights on. I staggered across the landing from the bed on which I was suffering from severe sciatic pain due to a ruptured disc.
    I sat down...and screamed.
    The seat was up, I went further down than expected which bloody HURT and the porcelain was cold.

    He always puts the seat and lid down now and has done so ever since.



  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    edited October 2021
    St. Everild, it’s not just kittens that need to be rescue...
    Many years ago, one of our cats brought a bird in and released it in the kitchen, where it took refuge behind a pile of things.
    The next morning, I was getting Lord P ready for school, and I managed to shoo the bird into the bathroom and close the door.
    I had to go to work, so I rang Darllenwr in work, and put a sign on the bathroom door to remind he and Lord P not to allow the cats in.
    When I got home, the bathroom door was open, so I asked Darllenwr if he’d managed to get the bird out.
    He told me that he’d had to fish it out of the toilet. The poor thing had drown because I had left the lid up and it had fallen in the water in the pan ☹️
  • MiffyMiffy Shipmate
    This discussion has more than a whiff of the late, great Urinal Cake thread from the Old Ship.

    On my first visit to the good old US of A, I was still pre-menopausal (just) and found the American auto flushing looks distinctly unnerving, especially when dealing with those ‘times of the month.’ Suffice it to say, their estimation of when I was ‘done’ did not agree with mine. (Ladies, you’ll understand).
  • MiffyMiffy Shipmate
    Miffy wrote: »
    This discussion has more than a whiff of the late, great Urinal Cake thread from the Old Ship.

    On my first visit to the good old US of A, I was still pre-menopausal (just) and found the American auto flushing looks distinctly unnerving, especially when dealing with those ‘times of the month.’ Suffice it to say, their estimation of when I was ‘done’ did not agree with mine. (Ladies, you’ll understand).

    Loos, not looks. Wretched autofill.

  • Miffy wrote: »
    This discussion has more than a whiff of the late, great Urinal Cake thread from the Old Ship.

    On my first visit to the good old US of A, I was still pre-menopausal (just) and found the American auto flushing looks distinctly unnerving, especially when dealing with those ‘times of the month.’ Suffice it to say, their estimation of when I was ‘done’ did not agree with mine. (Ladies, you’ll understand).

    To further degrade this already, er, discussion--

    I sometimes found myself grateful for the multiple flush.
  • Miffy wrote: »
    found the American auto flushing looks distinctly unnerving,

    Some of them are set on a hair trigger, so that a modest rocking motion whilst seated is enough to make them flush. Others never notice you've sat down, so you have to wave your hand in front of the sensor to make anything happen.

  • LatchKeyKidLatchKeyKid Purgatory Host
    Miffy wrote: »
    found the American auto flushing looks distinctly unnerving,

    Some of them are set on a hair trigger, so that a modest rocking motion whilst seated is enough to make them flush. Others never notice you've sat down, so you have to wave your hand in front of the sensor to make anything happen.

    Japanese flushing was unnerving at first. The flushing starts as soon as you enter the toilet so that its sound masks any sound you make. They have water, we can't be that profligate with it in our part of Oz.
  • Aberdeen University installed some "energy saving" automatic sensor toilets in its library. Flushing happened once the lid was down, the toilet wouldn't flush with the lid up.

    Possibly my problems with the cubicles was due to me being fatter than the average student, but I triggered the hand dryer and the taps just by entering the cubicle. The whole experience was a cacophany of the dryer going off and on, the taps going off and on, and the toilet paper dispensing randomly.

    After using the facilities for their intended purpose, and having washed my hands, I would tidy up a bit, pick up the randomly dispensed toilet paper, flush that, and then wash my hands again.

    Other people must have had similar issues, because the hand dryers and toilet paper dispenser were replaced with lower-tech equivalents.

  • BoogieBoogie Heaven Host
    I have a radar key to access disabled loos.

    Great, except that the doors are so heavy I can’t open them with my hopeless hands. 🙄🤔
  • Yikes! didn't know your cubicles included the sink and etc. as well. That would be a problem indeed. Bad enough to have to cope with the toilet going possessed.
  • Most cubicles don't contain a sink, if they are a row of toilets in a room, the sinks are usually along the opposite wall or are a bank in the middle of the room. The disabled toilets do have all the gismos.
  • That's what I'm familiar with. The example mentioned (in-cubicle) seemed unusual--unless the poster meant a single-person-bathroom, in which case it sounds unusually small!
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Both Turanga, the Central Library, and the Bus Interchange here - built since the quakes, have cubicles for all genders and for people with disabilities. The cubicles are spacious and each contains handwashing and drying facilities. The only snag I have discovered is that not everyone locks the door, so I am always tentative when opening it.
  • JapesJapes Shipmate
    In my workplace, we have one remaining toilet with a high cistern and a chain which is also in our wheelchair-accessible room.

    Chain is long enough for those in wheelchairs to reach. It's been, um, interesting training the visually impaired student who always uses that particular toilet for other accessibilty needss. "This toilet is really old, isn't it Japes?" as I was explaining how it all worked when doing the orientation on Day One this year.

    Alas, the pipe work in the building has not kept up with the additional toilets added over the years to accomodate the increasing number in the building so the next round of explaining was working out how much toilet paper was reasonable before the next flush. Then training the other students/staff who use that toilet to ensure they've told me if the flush hasn't worked for them.
  • That's what I'm familiar with. The example mentioned (in-cubicle) seemed unusual--unless the poster meant a single-person-bathroom, in which case it sounds unusually small!

    The library has uni-sex toilets, each one opening off the main area. I shouldn't have described them as "cubicles." Size-wise they are the same width as a cubicle, but slightly longer. Definitely designed for skinny students!
  • I don't know why toilets open inwards, thus squashing the user between the door and the pan as the door is closed.
    And if they open outwards, it makes it easier to help if there is a problem.
  • In some school toilets which I use regularly, one out of three cubicles has an outward opening door, plus grab handles, and is slightly larger, so is good for larger ladies and those with some mobility issues. There is hardly any queuing space though, and a hand dryer which is easily set off by those entering and exiting.
    I assume there is also another toilet suitable for people in wheelchairs.
  • I think theyre afraid you will joyfully throw the door open and brain someone passing by!
  • At our local senior center, the bathroom door opens out, but weighs a ton, and is hard to open. If one has a walker or wheel chair impossible without help. Once inside a nice large room with ease in moving around and low sink easy to use if in a wheel chair.
  • Ethne AlbaEthne Alba Shipmate
    edited October 2021
    By the time I was pregnant with the last one ( 1990s) the uk had quite a thing for those Very Thin Loos .
    On one memorable shopping trip I could find NO suitable public toilet for my very pregnant self.

    So I complained!
    To a mystified manager who was unable to offer any sensible advice. Or any another toilet.

  • @Ethne Alba when Mrs BA was almost eight months pregnant with our first, lo these 40 years ago, the in-laws insisted that family Christmas dinner would be at a restaurant to minimise stress. In the course of the meal she had to use the toilet. After some time had elapsed her mother went looking for her. She was trapped in the cubicle because the door would not open around her pregnant tummy. She had to unlock the door and stand on the seat while her mother pushed the door open to release her. As for minimising stress, her BP went through the roof overnight, she was admitted to hospital on Boxing Day and our son was born on the 28th.
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