Annunciation on Monday?

Did anyone keep Lady Day on Monday with a sung/solemn Eucharist? It’s all very well to transfer a feast to the nearest day after a major festival but we have all had enough church by then – and our choir is on holiday.

Plus we get the readings on Advent 4

Comments

  • No, we've transferred it to this coming Saturday, to the regular monthly Mass for our Cell of Our Lady of Walsingham. There will be a couple of suitable hymns, and Rosa Mystica incense...

    A church in this Diocese whose dedication is to The Annunciation is having a Sung Mass tomorrow (Wednesday) evening, perhaps for the reasons Leo has mentioned!

    IJ
  • There wasn't a Sung Eucharist where I worship, but it will have been observed at the two said services earlier in the day. Choral Evensong (not Solemn) had been planned for the evening but unfortunately the visiting choir had to cancel due to illness. Instead we had Evening Prayer from Common Worship and I quite enjoyed being able to use the order from Christmastide, which is what CW Daily Prayer suggests for this festival.

    I did hear someone afterwards comment derisively to their companion, "I prefer the Book of Common Prayer". I guess expecting an Annunciation BCP Choral Evensong and instead being asked to flick around Daily Prayer looking for the right antiphons it's going to bring out the traditionalist in anyone.

    As I said I didn't mind it but if I didn't have another engagement to get to later that evening I would have tried to find a parish where a Mass was being offered. Far from having had enough of church I think a reminder of the incarnation is just what I needed after Low Sunday.
  • kmannkmann Shipmate
    In the Church of Norway the annunciation is always in Lent, and always on a Sunday, so this year it was transferred to March 18, the 5th Sunday of Lent.
  • I do not think there was a sung eucharist but two said ones on Monday and Regina Coeli at the said mass on Sunday; also sung after sung mass on Sunday but that would have happened anyway.
  • kmann wrote: »
    In the Church of Norway the annunciation is always in Lent, and always on a Sunday, so this year it was transferred to March 18, the 5th Sunday of Lent.

    Well, it's always good to observe The Annunciation at or around the proper time, IYSWIM, but, if you celebrated it in Norway on the 5th Sunday of Lent this year, didn't that interfere with the natural progression of Bible readings etc. through Lent to Passiontide?

    IJ

  • kmannkmann Shipmate
    kmann wrote: »
    In the Church of Norway the annunciation is always in Lent, and always on a Sunday, so this year it was transferred to March 18, the 5th Sunday of Lent.

    Well, it's always good to observe The Annunciation at or around the proper time, IYSWIM, but, if you celebrated it in Norway on the 5th Sunday of Lent this year, didn't that interfere with the natural progression of Bible readings etc. through Lent to Passiontide?
    Well, the Annunciation was the readings for that day. And come to think about it I believe that the annunciation is alway on the 5th Sunday of Lent in the Church of Norway (or perhaps also on the 4th Sunday of Lent).
  • This is not knowledge but a quirk, but until I pointed it out that it was not always around 25th March, my father maintained Mothering Sunday was the feast of the Annunciation. No idea where he got it from but it may reflect a practice elsewhere.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited April 2018
    Hmm. In the 1662 BCP, the Gospel for Lent 4 (now often observed as 'Mothering Sunday') is the feeding of the 5000.

    In more recent times the contemporary C of E lectionary has John's brief account of Our Lady at the foot of the cross ('Woman, here is your son etc.') as the Gospel for Lent 4, tying in both the Lenten themes of looking towards the cross, and also the concept of motherly care...IYSWIM.

    So, the Annunciation still really doesn't quite fit into Lent. YMMV.

    IJ
  • The Annunciation,as people know,is generally observed on 25th March and was for many centuries the beginning of the New Year. With the message of the Angel to the Virgin Mary came the beginning of the Christian message. Being around the Spring Equinox and also around the Feast of Passover it was assumed also that this date marked indeed the beginning of the creation of the world.
    In the wake of the Council of Trent Pope Gregory XIII reformed the calendar in the 1580s and changed the date for the beginning of the year to the first of January.This was not accepted in many countries particularly non-Catholic countries and we know that it wasn't until the middle of the 1700s that England changed to the Gregorian calendar with its new New Year date being first of January.the other change at that time was to omit days which were out of synch with the natural calendar and England jumped from 25th March on to 6th April which is still in England the beginning of the tax year.
  • It’s interesting to have The Annunciation right after Easter. If you ignore that Ascension and Pentecost are still on the way, which I know you shouldn’t, it does seem like the big annual Advent-Easter drama of salvation history is finally over, and now the Annuciation is an end-of-credits scene at the tail end of the movie saying that we are just a gestation period away from all of it starting all over again!
  • Forthview wrote: »
    The Annunciation,as people know,is generally observed on 25th March and was for many centuries the beginning of the New Year.
    There was a long-standing tradition that it was also the date of the crucifixion.

    And as Tolkien fans will recall, March 25th was the day the One Ring was cast back into Mount Doom.

  • If memory serves the connection actually runs the other way - the date of the crucifixion was calculated to be 25th March (possibly erroneously) and in keeping with Jewish legend it was deduced that the annunciation was on the same day and hence that the nativity fell 9 months later.
  • Possibly. I forget now the exact order in which the Annunciation–Incarnation–Crucifixion dates developed.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    Forthview wrote: »
    we know that it wasn't until the middle of the 1700s that England changed to the Gregorian calendar with its new New Year date being first of January.the other change at that time was to omit days which were out of synch with the natural calendar and England jumped from 25th March on to 6th April which is still in England the beginning of the tax year.
    I think the actual jump was somewhere around the beginning of September, but that is the reason for the tax year running when it does. People would have objected to being billed for 365 days when they'd only had about 350.
  • This year we celebrated the Annunciation way back in Lent on 9th March!

    At our monthly Walsingham Cell Mass, always held on the 2nd Saturday of the month, our visiting retired retired priest decided to celebrate a Mass of the Annunciation. When he arrived that morning, he looked through the blue Walsingham book, and decided as it was March we would use the Mass of the Annunciation. We all agreed to it, sang some appropriate hymns, and decided not celebrate the Annunciation again this week.
  • Well, as I said, we're doing much the same tomorrow (using the same Walsingham blue book...).

    If a special Holyday has to be anticipated, or transferred, or whatever, keep it when you know you'll get a congregation!

    Our Walsingham Mass used to be on the first Saturday each month, but lately has become a moveable feast, on account of not having a Priest-Associate of our own. Father Vicar-Up-The-Road is a P-A, however, and kindly looks after our Cell (some of his own folk are members, as his church has no Cell of its own - yet!) depending on when he's available.

    IJ
  • It’s interesting to have The Annunciation right after Easter. If you ignore that Ascension and Pentecost are still on the way, which I know you shouldn’t, it does seem like the big annual Advent-Easter drama of salvation history is finally over, and now the Annuciation is an end-of-credits scene at the tail end of the movie saying that we are just a gestation period away from all of it starting all over again!

    In my case replete with an appropriate soundtrack as I pretty much woke up that morning with (I do hope nobody else is susceptible to earworms) O Come, O Come, Emmanuel lopping in my head. Only later did I put two and two together and realise my subconscious is a rather good DJ.

    This is my first liturgical year as a Christian and I have no desire to skip forward to the next one already, but I think it's a useful foretaste coming just after Easter.
  • For keeping the feast on the transferred date - Monday 9 April - I looked for a Mass (preferably solemn) in the evening. I short-listed a few churches that I know; I looked up their websites and found what I was looking for. I came up with and went along to a Central London church and went along - everything I could wish for!
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