Here's tae us, wha's like us

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  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited October 2018
    Well, I suppose I normally speak 'received English', having bin drug up proper-like in a Grammar School, or, when out-and-about in the parish, 'estuary English'! That is to say, a Sarf London/Norf Kent accent, somewhat akin to Cockney, innit.....

    Look - there's a Torf! 'Eave arf a brick at 'im!

    The impression I got from the chap from Edinburgh, who, as they say in Ireland, was the better for drink, was that the Caithness accent wasn't very strong at all - in fact, barely distinguishable from 'received English'! I'm sure I don't usually have an Ulster-Scots accent, despite my family origins.

    Hence my incredulity.....

    I tend to (unconsciously, perhaps) mimic the accents of people I'm talking to, I think. As the Apostle Paul says, all things to all [people]...

    IJ
  • It confused my fellow Guide leader who went to Shetland for a craft week last week. She came back saying how far away it was and how far she'd travelled - that it was an hour by plane from Aberdeen. I had tried telling her how far north the Orkneys are and then the Shetlands are even further - and how much more of Scotland there is north of Aberdeen, to Inverness and north again - but she really hadn't taken it in.
  • HopeHope Shipmate
    The impression I got from the chap from Edinburgh, who, as they say in Ireland, was the better for drink, was that the Caithness accent wasn't very strong at all - in fact, barely distinguishable from 'received English'!

    Judge for yourself ;)

    http://www.ayecan.com/listen_to_scots/caithness.html
  • Well, clearly the chap from Edinburgh was away with the fairies - I certainly don't speak with a Caithness accent!

    :flushed:

    IJ
  • Maybe he had come across the large number of people in one part of Caithness who aren't natives, brought to the area by jobs at Dounreay. I'd bet a lot of them speak with a "received English" accent. A lot of "unskilled" migrants (ie, earning less than £50k per year) just like me, with PhDs in nuclear physics.
  • Could be, Alan - the journey I refer to was in the autumn of 1973, at which time I guess Dounreay was in full working order.

    IJ
  • I don't think I've ever come across it, but there used to be a theory that those who spoke English as a second language, with Gaelic as the first, spoke a very pure English. Not that there were a lot of native Gaelic speakers in Caithness.
  • And I think that refers to a lack of special dialect words, rather than the accent. No one would say the Lewis accent is anything like RP English! And I know which I prefer....
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited October 2018
    ... "unskilled" migrants (ie, earning less than £50k per year) ...
    I wish my lack of skills would earn me something approaching £50,000 a year!
    ... in the autumn of 1973, at which time I guess Dounreay was in full working order.
    It was indeed; I was taken on a tour round it that summer while at a church camp. Crikey - that's 45 years ago! :flushed:

    I was born in Inverness, where they say the English is very "pure" (although as I was only there for six weeks, I didn't really pick it up), and for the first three or so years of my life lived in Helmsdale in Sutherland. While I might retain a vestige of a Sutherland accent, I'd probably be recognisable as an Orcadian to anyone who travels the A9 to get home. Of course, like everyone who lives far away from their roots, the closer I get geographically to Orkney, the stronger my accent gets; my Canadian friends are always a bit amused when I come back from my holidays ... :mrgreen:

    To my ears, the Sutherland accent (and to a lesser extent the Inverness one) is like a softer version of the Caithness one.

    It amuses me that to non-Scots, one Scottish accent is much like another: when I worked in Belfast I had a colleague with a really strong Glaswegian accent (think Billy Connolly up an octave), and people would mistake her for me on the phone, although to each other we sounded as much like each other as we sounded like the Queen.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited October 2018
    The Glaswegian accent is something to die for, or from.

    :warning:

    IJ
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    We had a Glaswegian student in the college where I worked in Belfast whose voice made one of my (Northern Irish) colleagues go weak at the knees. She used to beg me to let her give him his grant cheque (which was usually my job), just so that she could listen to him saying "thank you".

  • Did she actually understand what he was saying?

    IME, Glaswegian is....er...sometimes hard to fathom....

    I'll get ma bonnet.....

    IJ
  • HopeHope Shipmate
    Alan might well have the right of it.

    The fact that it was an Edinburgh person makes me smile. The joke I hear when someone is speaking something like RP is that they're talking with an Edinburgh accent ;)

    And I'm sure you could develop a Caithness accent if you wanted to, BF! Probably better than me, who was born and brought up here but still has some non-descript generic Scottish accent :blush:
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    If you want a bit of a laugh, check out Colin Campbell's Local Radio on Youtube - it'll tickle the funny-bone of anyone with Caithness connections. :smiley:
  • Quite often in Canada people have said how they like my Scottish accent. When I'm in Scotland they ask me where I got my English accent. From England. It was my father's fault - they made him move south during the war (WWII, that is...) I seem to be losing my ear for accents as I get older and sometimes struggle in Glasgow because of the speed of their delivery. For some reason, when I worked in Edinburgh I found the accent somewhat annoying, and I can't really say why. Perhaps because I grew up with my father's Greenock accent. Going to university in Aberdeen was a completely new experience. At that time there were a lot of real teuchters in the class, as well as one or two lecturers who could lay it on when they wanted to. It's not quite the same now, but I still enjoy it.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    My parents were both from Greenock too (although Dad's parents were from Caithness and Orkney), and while you'd have known that Dad was from "west of the middle", my mum's accent was much less easy to place.

    I get lots of nice comments about my accent too, although I'm often mistaken for Irish or Welsh. :confused:
  • Someone said they couldn't see a Scots thread on St. Andrews Day, so bringing it back to the top of the heap to wish all and sundry a good one. I was talking St. Andrew to a very small school yesterday (5 pupils), and they were really intrigued by the idea of taking bits of people's bones all over the place!
  • Happy St Andrew's day!

    I saw a recipe for haggis lasagne, which looked interesting. Anyone tried it?
  • Do share!
  • Our work canteen had Haggis neeps and tatties as the "special" earlier this week, and i was wondering why they didn't wait for today, but then remembered that the special on a Friday is always Fish & Chips.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Rather belatedly wishing everyone a happy St. Andrew's Day. Haven't had any haggis yet, but D. had a few nods to Caledonia in his lunchtime concert (see my comment on the British thread).
  • We held our unique and fantastic Ceilidh Carol Concert in one of my churches last night. Local choir, the local fiddle group and a mixture of fiddling, choral pieces, solos and audience carols. It was a pack out and a lovely way to launch into what people always describe - with an air of surprise and originality - "This must be a busy time for you!"
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited December 2018
    Cathscats wrote: »
    ... what people always describe - with an air of surprise and originality - "This must be a busy time for you!"
    I wish I had a fiver for every time someone asks us if we're going away (or "home") for Christmas.

    Don't people realise that Christmas is a working day for an organist? The last time D. was "home" (as in where his family lived) for Christmas was 1976.
  • Happy St Andrew's day!

    I saw a recipe for haggis lasagne, which looked interesting. Anyone tried it?

    (Catching up old threads)
    No, but have you tried a haggis curry? It's really good. But as our dinner guest that night told me later, you don't ever want to eat it if you are preaching the next day.
  • Nothing to do with haggis (the finest variety of which we obtained some years ago in Eyemouth). But we are awaiting the delivery of our Most Excellent Smoked Salmon from North Uist.
  • Having just popped by this thread, I was intrugued to discover that I had an unposted comment lurking, see below. I wonder how long that's been lurking?

    Bunnet, surely?

    AG
  • JapesJapes Shipmate
    Don't people realise that Christmas is a working day for an organist? The last time D. was "home" (as in where his family lived) for Christmas was 1976.

    I would certainly have gathered a few fivers today - the turn up once a year for the Carol Service/Crib Service/Midnight Mass folk I can be gracious with - the regular congregation who just don't think get a bit more of a snarky "And just who do you think will be playing the organ if I'm not here?" and someone who really should know better was reminded where I live is my home not where my one surviving parent is - I've not lived in that house since 1983 and can count on the fingers of one hand how often I've been there overnight since.

    I was last "home" for Christmas 1991, which had extenuating circumstances and the consensus was I had to be there, but never again.
  • DardaDarda Shipmate
    Staying on the Isle of Mull over Christmas and Hogmanay. Not many places other than the west coast of Scotland where you can get to see otter, dolphin and white tailed eagle on Christmas Eve.
  • I am so jealous. I spent Christmas on Skye a couple of years ago and want to go back.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I've just checked The Orcadian web-site, and the Boys' Ba' went up (boo hiss) and the Men's went doon (hurrah!).

    :smiley:
  • DardaDarda Shipmate
    Took our granddaughter (who has educational special needs) over to Iona today. Lovely to be on the Island at this time of year with so few people around. Just about everything closed up, and Historic Scotland not bothering to open their ticket office so free entry to the Abbey. Had the Abbey all to ourselves and ate sandwiches in the Iona Community's Chapter House - the only heated place we could find! Now sitting by the wood burner, with oatcakes and Black Crowdie, washed down with Scapa single malt.
  • I believe that the few Iona Community Staff-Volunteers who are currently on the Island will be holding worship in the Michael Chapel rather than the Abbey.
  • DardaDarda Shipmate
    Jengie Jon wrote: »
    I believe that the few Iona Community Staff-Volunteers who are currently on the Island will be holding worship in the Michael Chapel rather than the Abbey.

    Yes, the Community usually use the Michael Chapel during winter. Lots of contractors huts / equipment round at the moment as the Community is making major improvements to its residential accommodation - when I stayed there some years ago it was pretty basic. Scaffolding currently inside the Abbey Church to investigate and repair a roof leak. The Abbey will apparently be closed to visitors January - March 2019 to replace the antiquated heating system. I think this is more for conservation reasons than human comfort! Do check if intending to visit in the early part of next year; a long journey to make only to be disappointed.
  • Quite often in Canada people have said how they like my Scottish accent. When I'm in Scotland they ask me where I got my English accent. .
    Professor Gordon spent many years at Victoria Uni in Wellington and spoke on radio programmes (this was so long ago...) He never, of course, lost his gentle Scots accent. But whenever he went back to Scotland it seems they remarked on his New Zealand accent.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Although it's over 30 years since I lived in Scotland, I've made a point of not losing my Orkney accent, which admittedly gets rather stronger whenever I go home!

    Like Stercus, I've had lots of compliments about my accent here in Canada - Scottish accents seem to go down well here! :smile:
  • Sitting in Debenhams castle view restaurant in Edinburgh admiring the castle and the castellated silhouette of the Mound against a perfect clear blue sky. My meeting finished early and my train north is not for a couple of hours. I would go for a walk except that I have a heavy bag and a blister on my heel. So I will sit here, nursing a soft drink and writing my sermon, with the view and the sunshine for inspiration! Could be worse!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Could be a lot worse, Cathscats - I love visiting Edinburgh, and not just because my sister and brother live there!

    <envious>
  • Piglet wrote: »
    Although it's over 30 years since I lived in Scotland, I've made a point of not losing my Orkney accent, which admittedly gets rather stronger whenever I go home!

    Like Stercus, I've had lots of compliments about my accent here in Canada - Scottish accents seem to go down well here! :smile:

    But I was outed again the other day. I said no more than "Good morning" to a man at the YMCA gym. "I love your English accent!" said he. He turned out to be from Pakistan, and we had an interesting conversation about languages and accents on account of those two words.
  • I tried the haggis lasagne recipe tonight and it was surprisingly good.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I suppose there's no reason why haggis lasagne shouldn't work - after all, haggis is basically posh mince, just differently flavoured from ragu Bolognese.
  • Must be something in the water. I had a haggis shepherds pie a couple of days ago.
  • Must remember to get in some Haggis for Friday! The local butcher is pretty good, but he will be busy so maybe today will be a good day to purchase.
  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited January 21
    We have a problem. As Any (Skottish) Fule Kno, Friday is Burns Night - but it's also the night I've booked for the Church Panto! And it's also St. Dwynwen's day - a suitable card (in Welsh) has been purchased.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I think it can be transferred, like a major saint's day. :smiley:
  • After 20 odd years in Scotland, tomorrow will be my first Burns Supper.
  • Hope it's a good one. They vary.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I lived the first 26 years of my life in Scotland and I've still never been to a Burns supper.

    Hope you enjoy it! :)
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    I went into the Scotmid in Marchmont today to buy the vegetables to go with tomorrow’s haggis - and they had NAE NEEPS!

    What are Scottish grocers coming to?
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Nae neeps, at this time of year?????

    Civilisation as we know it is coming to an end ... :flushed:
  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited January 24
    They're being stockpiled against Brexit. Mind you, I bought one in Cardiff today (where there may be Less Demand).

    We will be having a Burns Lunch (with perhaps a "wee dram" later).
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