Here's tae us, wha's like us

13

Comments

  • Best wishes to all in Scotland especialy those celebrating Burns' night. May you wake in the morning with a clear heid.
  • I was in a greetings card shop in Perth earlier today, and saw, for the first time, Burns Night cards. Some had quotations from Burns on them: "A man's a man for a' that", etc. But my favourite said "Eat haggis and Ceilidh on!" Is this a new thing, or have I missed out on is phenomenon from usually not being in a city?
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    Cathscats wrote: »
    ... "Eat haggis and Ceilidh on!" ...
    I like that! :mrgreen:
  • FirenzeFirenze Heaven Host
    Just had a Rusty Nail* (or two): haggis, neeps and tatties, a half litre of Caledonian IPA and a Bunnahabhain chaser.

    I may not move for some time.

    ^whisky and Glayva over ice.
  • Firenze wrote: »
    Just had a Rusty Nail* (or two): haggis, neeps and tatties, a half litre of Caledonian IPA and a Bunnahabhain chaser.

    I may not move for some time.

    ^whisky and Glayva over ice.

    That mixture would probably have the same effect as a colonoscopy prep on my system... You have earned my respect.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    edited January 26
    two icy daquiris here, icy cold. 42 ° C here
  • I was working near my daughter's flat yesterday, and crashed her Burns Supper for an hour before catching my train home. She was catering for 8 (with me as a last-minute ninth). There was two of everything - haggis, veggie haggis, tatties mashed with milk and butter, tatties mashed with soya milk, neeps ditto. I had to leave before pudding, but there was cranachan for the non-vegans, and vegan sticky toffee pudding.

    I was torn between admiration for the effort and relief that veganism wasn't a thing back in my student days.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    One of my nieces is a vegetarian* and occasional vegan, and while I admire her restraint, it's not the path for me.

    * She would eat fish rather than let it go to waste - she's very conscious of sell-by dates.
  • I take it you've seen the best place to live in the UK, Piglet?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-47000276

    AG
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    I have indeed! Quite right too. :smiley:

    I was surprised that Edinburgh didn't make it into the top 50 though: if money were no object, it would be my second choice!
  • Edinburgh is full of tourists (year round) and students. And it is noisy! I was there for 3 nights the week before last, and while it is beautiful (hence the tourists) I wouldn't live there again, though my firstborn, a student, loves it.
  • Has anyone travelled on the "reconditioned" carriages that Scotrail have started using? The ones where, instead of pushing a button to open the door, you have to slide down the window, lean out and use the external handle?

    I was on one a couple of weeks ago and every time the train left a station, there would be a warning about not opening the windows and sticking your head out whilst the train was moving. This warning concluded "there is a risk of serious injury or death. I repeat there is a risk of DEATH!"

    I've now used another, and this time the announcement described using the external handle and concluded "After touching the handle, please ensure you wash your hands thoroughly."

    I suspect the guards don't like these carriages and are competing to outdo each other with these announcements. Anyone else heard any?
  • FirenzeFirenze Heaven Host
    You’ve not had one saying ‘This train is bound for Glory’? That would be unsettling.
  • Has anyone travelled on the "reconditioned" carriages that Scotrail have started using? The ones where, instead of pushing a button to open the door, you have to slide down the window, lean out and use the external handle?

    Here in Australia, I have just been reading an article which explains the delays in refurbishment of the carriages to provide those new features. Apparently the contractors underestimated the quantity of repairs required, as the trains had been in very intensive services on the Great Western, hence the use of 'classic' HSTs in service. The images of the refurbished carriages looked very classy. Hopefully, you'll draw a new model soon NEQ.
  • MMMMMM Shipmate
    Here in England, give me the old ones back any time, please.

    The new trains have tiny, high seats (I feel a bit like I’m sitting in a high chair), they have no coat hooks, no leg room, no arm rests and no fold-down table.

    Yes, Thameslink, I mean you.

    MMM
  • I don't mind the carriages, it's just the death and destruction announcements I find a bit unnerving!
  • perhaps they are more prominent due to this recent event:
    Woman killed on train 'leaned out of window below warning sticker'
  • The firest time I sat down on one of Great Western's new trains that are replacing the HSTs I nearly broke my coccyx - the seats are like planks! They are very quiet in operation, mind.

    AG
  • So we've just relocated to Scotland.
    .
    .
    What are my Dos and Don'ts?
  • Do enjoy it. Do feel welcome. Do try Irn Bru.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    Excellent advice, Cathscats! I'd add - do try haggis and clapshot and good whisky.

    Wishing you well in God's Own Country™. :smiley:
  • Ethne Alba wrote: »
    So we've just relocated to Scotland.
    .
    .
    What are my Dos and Don'ts?

    Wrap up warm.
  • Welcome to Scotland!
  • Cathscats wrote: »
    Do enjoy it. Do feel welcome. Do try Irn Bru.

    ...and find a good dentist as soon as possible.
  • Ethne Alba wrote: »
    So we've just relocated to Scotland.
    .
    .
    What are my Dos and Don'ts?

    Wrap up warm.

    Don't eat yellow snow
  • I will contradict Cathscats - don't try Irn Bru. Don't try Buckie either. Do try a macaroni pie with chips - there is no finer carb-fest.
  • FirenzeFirenze Heaven Host
    Depends a little bit on which part of Scotland. If Edinburgh you don’t want to rush into being friendly with the neighbours - give it 20 years or so.
  • Have fun! Remember that Scotland is unlike England in ways you don't necessarily expect; get your adjectives right (I immediately became conscious that 'English' and 'British' are not as interchangeable as lots of English people think); and don't shove yer granny aff the bus! [url]https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3VCWROijdwM [/url]
  • And Scottish and British definitely are not interchangeable!
  • Cathscats wrote: »
    And Scottish and British definitely are not interchangeable!

    In sport for example. Scots are allowed to win and British athletes may lose.
  • DardaDarda Shipmate
    Piglet wrote: »
    Excellent advice, Cathscats! I'd add - do try haggis and clapshot and good whisky.

    Wishing you well in God's Own Country™. :smiley:

    My Yorkshire wife would disagree with your designation of God's Own Country, although she might place Scotland second!
  • Useful vocabulary for everyday life in Scotland:

    It's dingin' doon - It is raining heavily.
    It's comin' doon in stair-rods - It is raining heavily.
    It's comin' doon hale watter - It is raining heavily.
    It's pishin' doon - It is raining heavily.
    It's stoatin' doon - It is raining heavily.
  • It's Baltic - It is very cold.
    It's brass monkeys - It is very cold.
    It's pure starvation - It is very cold (n.b. in Scots you can be starving hungry or starving cold).
    Snell - very cold.
  • BroJamesBroJames Shipmate
    Braw - very cold, but the sun is shining (momentarily)
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    Darda wrote: »
    Piglet wrote: »
    ... Wishing you well in God's Own Country™. :smiley:
    My Yorkshire wife would disagree with your designation of God's Own Country, although she might place Scotland second!
    I know Yorkshire's quite big, but it isn't a country*. :wink:

    I'll add to NEQ's excellent weather glossary:

    blowin' a hoolie - rather windy
    dreich - grey, damp/wet, cold and miserable

    * assuming they haven't declared UDI because of Brexit
  • Piglet wrote: »
    Darda wrote: »
    Piglet wrote: »
    ... Wishing you well in God's Own Country™. :smiley:
    My Yorkshire wife would disagree with your designation of God's Own Country, although she might place Scotland second!
    I know Yorkshire's quite big, but it isn't a country*. :wink:

    I'll add to NEQ's excellent weather glossary:

    blowin' a hoolie - rather windy
    dreich - grey, damp/wet, cold and miserable

    * assuming they haven't declared UDI because of Brexit
    But we have an international football team! :wink:
    Dreich is a wonderful word; I use it on a regular basis.
  • DafydDafyd Shipmate
    Dreich is a wonderful word; I use it on a regular basis.
    While it is a wonderful word, there aren't many occasions to use it: it's only when the weather deviates from dreich that it calls for comment.

  • Havers, to use another wonderful word. We comment on all kinds of weather!

    Spell check is determined I should not write the word havers!
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Shipmate
    edited February 2
    Dreich - grey, chilly, dismal but not raining yet.
    Smirr - a fine, mistlike, saturating rain.
    Haar - as above, but specifically a saturating misty wetness which has drifted inland from the sea.
    Spitting - rain which has just started and hasn't got going properly yet. Spitting rain can go one of two ways. If you notice that it has started to spit and leave your washing on the line, it will increase until it it is full scale rain. Alternatively, if you dash out to rescue your washing, the spitting rain will abate rapidly as soon as you have unpegged the last sock.

    A South African told me recently that when he first came to Scotland he underestimated people's ages, because our skin is rarely damaged by the sun. Every cloud etc etc. :sunglasses:
  • FirenzeFirenze Heaven Host
    Ah yes. In Ireland the progression was from spitting to pissing to, as they say in Belfast, coming down in torments.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    Firenze wrote: »
    ... In Ireland the progression was from spitting to pissing ...
    With the correct local pronunciation, obviously:

    passion n. heavy rain in Ballymena :mrgreen:

  • Piglet wrote: »
    Firenze wrote: »
    ... In Ireland the progression was from spitting to pissing ...
    With the correct local pronunciation, obviously:

    passion n. heavy rain in Ballymena :mrgreen:

    Lovely!

    (What happened to the quotes file? This one belongs there).
  • FirenzeFirenze Heaven Host
    Interviewer: ‘What do you do about sex?’
    Ballymena Resident: ‘We have waur tea.”
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    ... What happened to the quotes file?
    It's in the Circus. :smiley:
  • Spitting - rain which has just started and hasn't got going properly yet. Spitting rain can go one of two ways. If you notice that it has started to spit and leave your washing on the line, it will increase until it it is full scale rain. Alternatively, if you dash out to rescue your washing, the spitting rain will abate rapidly as soon as you have unpegged the last sock.
    I think that happens all over Ukland! Poor Incy Wincy spider will be demented, climbing up and down his spout (= drainpipe, roan).

    By the way, you forgot "Scotch Mist" - or is that something that only descends upon certain Glaswegians late on Saturday nights?

  • Never heard a Scot referring to weather as Scotch mist. It is just mist, or haar etc. And there are many words for Saturday night meteorology!
  • I've never referred to the weather as being Scotch mist - I've only used it in the phrase
    "What do you think this is? Scotch mist?!"
    ie you should have seen something which is obvious
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    I don't think any self-respecting Scot would use the word "Scotch" as an adjective in any other way, unless the next word is "whisky".

    My maternal grandparents were going to emigrate to America in the 1920s, and were married at Ellis Island. We visited the museum and found the ship's manifest with Grandad's name on it, and his nationality listed as "Scotch".

    They mustn't have taken to life there - a short time later they were back in Scotland, which is why I'm not American ... :mrgreen:
  • bassobasso Shipmate
    Piglet wrote: »
    We visited the museum and found the ship's manifest with Grandad's name on it, and his nationality listed as "Scotch".
    The US census report in about 1870 tells me that my great-grandfather's parents were born in "Whales".
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host
    basso wrote: »
    ... my great-grandfather's parents were born in "Whales".
    Sounds a bit fishy if you ask me. :mrgreen:
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