On Screen Now! The 2019 Movie Thread

245

Comments

  • As a gay man who has divided my life more or less equally between Europe and the borders of the American Bible Belt, and who studied at the same Cambridge college as Sacha Baron Cohen (not at the same time), I felt closer to the "redneck" hunters in Brüno than I did to the main character. He was clearly expecting a more dramatic reaction than their obvious but fairly polite discomfort in the face of clear provocation. That shows that he DOES NOT UNDERSTAND THE SOUTH. American Southerners, of whom I am at least half of one, have committed some of the most appalling acts in the history of humanity, but they have always placed a high value on outward politeness.
    I've been deeper than the border and that politeness is a mixed thing. One further complicated by colour. Yes, he expects a behaviour that is not universal. But nor is it non-existent.

  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    On a much, much, much lighter note, if you like comic-book superhero movies at all -- or just like to see people having a lot of fun with animation -- do NOT miss "Into the Spider Verse." SO MUCH FUN.
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    YES!
  • Simon ToadSimon Toad Shipmate
    edited February 11
    My feeling is:

    1. People in the South did some very nasty things, but they are far from unique even among the actions of colonials throughout the rest of the world, let alone human history. Where White Southerners stand almost without equal is in their celebration of their particular awfulness, and in apparently seeking to perpetuate a racially segregated and partly disenfranchised society. I can only think of the Afrikaners, a very small segment of the White South African population as being similar. So its not what the Afrikaners and White Southern Conservatives' ancestors did that is the real problem, but what they themselves are doing now. So, @Columba_in_a_Currach don't beat yourself up about it, or talk yourself down. You seem to be part of the solution.

    2. I don't reckon Cohen gives a stuff about understanding the South or the USA. He just wants to use the anti-american sentiment in his audience to crack jokes. He should stick to cracking jokes at the expense of people he understands.

    3. Every time I think I am beginning to understand America, I remember that when older women said 'You're so sweet' in response to my adolescent opinion I actually thought that they thought I was sweet.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    Simon Toad wrote: »
    3. Every time I think I am beginning to understand America, I remember that when older women said 'You're so sweet' in response to my adolescent opinion I actually thought that they thought I was sweet.

    [tangent]When this older, Southern woman says that, she means it sincerely. [/tangent]
  • Just saw Alita: Battle Angel. The effects are amazing. The plot was a bit convoluted but not so much so as to be unfollowable. And darn it, it's always nice to see a kick-ass female hero.
  • Wife and I just saw The Green Book. The Green Book derives its name from a travel book that was written to show African Americans where they could get safe housing while traveling in the 40's and 50's. The storyline is about an African American pianist who wants to tour the South to show that people like him can be talented in more than athletics. He is fluent in five languages and has several Phd's. He has to hire a white bouncer from the Coca Cabana while it is closed for renovation as a driver but also to help protect him. Along the way, both men have to let go of their own prejudices. They end up continuing to be good friends until their deaths just months from each other. The story is written and produced by one of the sons of the bouncer who later became the Matre d' of the Coca Cabana Excellent movie.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Rashomon

    Okay, I finally watched this a few weeks back, and suffice to say, yeah, I don't think really it's my kind of movie.

    One thing: if I understood the story correctly, at least a couple of the characters were withholding information in their narrations of the incident. IOW it wasn't so much that they had different interpretations of the same event(as the story is often described), as they were outright lying.

    Or did I miss something here?
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited March 3
    Vice

    I'll give this one a 7, mostly for my usual caveat about being A Sucker For Anything Political, the fairly good performances from the major players, and Amy Adams.

    Other than that, having seen The Big Short a couple of times, I'm beginning to recognize director Adam Mckay's bag of tricks(fake endings, messing with the fourth wall etc), and they now feel less fresh and original than they did in the earlier film(to the extent that they did seem fresh and original; even in TBS, they seemed a little too-clever-by-half). Narrative stunts are like shock tactics: they only work once.

    The movie is clearly aimed at an audience that is ready to believe the worst about Cheney, which would include me pretty much all the time, but the aura of melodramatic villainy gets to be a little overdone. I'll also say that
    Donald Rumsfeld laughing maniacally when asked "What do we believe in?" seems more like a left-leaning screenwriter's idea of how cynicals elites are, then what they're actually like.
    I'm also not certain about how much sympathy I'm supposed to have for Mary Cheney over her supposed betrayal by her family, when sister Liz, allegedly with the connivance of her parents, came out against same-sex marriage in a 2014 congressional campaign. I mean, sure, her dad didn't openly spout anti-gay rhetoric(and apparently now supports equality as a private citizen), but he was the de facto leader of arguably the most homophobic political party in an industrialized democracy, and that doesn't seem to have bothered her overmuch. If wikipedia is to be believed, she's still a Republican to this day.

    All that said, if you hate Cheney, like good acting, can't get enough of the 2000s, or just wanna fawn over Amy Adams for a couple of hours, you'll probably like this.

  • It's worth noting (especially now that the movie has won the Oscar for Best Picture) that Dr. Shirley's surviving family have condemned the film. The filmmakers relied entirely on the chauffeur's family for their memories of the men's relationship, and didn't contact Dr. Shirley's relatives.
  • Wet KipperWet Kipper Shipmate
    Took the kids to Lego Movie 2 at the weekend

    If you though the "real life" moments in the first one were surreal, this one pushes it a bit further but it's still a great, funny movie- and plenty things for the parents to laugh at which go over the kids' heads - especially references to other films.

    bonus points for the self-referential catchy song, and the "song about the credits" which plays along with the credits.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    Well tonight, I went with D-U and her dear Hubby to see Captain Marvel! It's another very well done Marvel movie. However, the beginning had me somewhat confused. The confusion was deliberate, I think!
    You should not make any assumptions during the first third of the movie!

    The special effects, especially toward the end, were pretty amazing!
    We find out what happened to Fury's eye!
    And the acting was good, IMHO.

    There are some really funny moments, one of which was telegraphed from early on.

    If you go...stay for the credits! There are two extra scenes. One of which, I totally had predicted, but it was still hysterically funny when it happened!

    Movie two:
    That same theater shows older movies twice a week, and yesterday's show was Moulin Rouge, which I had not seen when it came out in 2001. D-U invited me to see it with her, and seemed pretty surprised that I wasn't familiar with it. I learned something new about D-U. She and one of her girlfriends saw it many, many times when they were in middle and high school. How did I miss that?

    Anyway, as above, I was very confused at the beginning. You may gather that I stay confused a lot. You wouldn't be wrong. Back to the movie. I was very tempted to take a nap after the first five minutes, but I'm glad I didn't. Once the story started rolling along, it sucked me in big time. Even though I knew how it would end, I was still sobbing at the heartbreaking scene near the end.

    This is one of those movies that make me glad that I never had to experience that life style. It's just too tragic. But that era (the 1890s) had a lot of tragedy incorporated into it, don't you agree?
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate

    Crazy Rich Asians

    Okay, I liked this, because rom-coms are one of my preferred genres, and they don't seem to make a lot of them anymore, or at least, none that come to Korea. Some negatives, though...

    - Apart from the socioeconomic angle promised by the title, it really is just a typical rom-com. The culture clash, while taking place between an American-raised person and her boyfriend's family in Singapore, has more to do with "rich" than "Asian". Though the script does manage to get in the usual thing about how Asians think westerners are too individualistic, Asians are more family-oriented etc.

    And for a film that bills itself as being about "Asians", almost all the Asian characters are of Chinese ethnicity. I get that "Asian" is often used to mean something like "East Asia" or "countries influenced by Confucianism", but even that constricted definition would also include Koreans, Japanese etc.

    All that said, if you like rom-coms, this will likely fit the bill for you.
  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    We went to see Fishermen's Friends this afternoon and thoroughly enjoyed it!
  • ChoristerChorister Shipmate
    Only just got around to seeing 'Bohemian Rhapsody' which I enjoyed very much. Thanks for reminding me that Fisherman's Friends' is another must-see.
  • Captain Marvel ... thoroughly enjoyed it though there were plot holes you could drive a transport through.

    Some movies you just say f-t I paid for a good time I'm having it.

    This was one.

    AFF
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Captain Marvel ... thoroughly enjoyed it though there were plot holes you could drive a transport through.

    Some movies you just say f-t I paid for a good time I'm having it.

    This was one.

    AFF

    Saw it a few hours ago. I liked the plot twists(which I didn't see coming), and the mid-90s setting. Other than that, though, yeah, not much going on intellectually but a fun couple of hours at the cinema.

    I did find it somewhat more user-friendly than other Marvel outings, probably because the character was being introduced for the firs time, so there weren't all these in-jokes about other Marvel characters and franchises. I gather though, that
    she's going be teaming up with the Avengers next film, so I guess we'll be in for a shitload of the aforementioned. (Don't think I'll bother with that one.)
  • A Feminine ForceA Feminine Force Shipmate
    edited March 17
    stetson wrote: »

    I did find it somewhat more user-friendly than other Marvel outings, probably because the character was being introduced for the firs time, so there weren't all these in-jokes about other Marvel characters and franchises.

    In your defense, there have been I think eighteen or twenty Marvel Cinematic Universe films since Iron Man was introduced in 2008. I've seen them all and even I have to go back and watch some again to refresh my memory. Others just because they were so damn enjoyable. Thor Ragnarok bears watching at least three times IMO.

    Thank god they are not intersecting the Avengers universe with the Xmen and the Fantastic Four, I would be totally out of it.

    But I noticed that a lot of characters that got dusted in Infinity War are relatively new, and the Old Guard (those ones whose contracts are expiring or who are a little long in the tooth) are sticking around for the first bit of End Game. I am expecting a bit of an inversion of universes ... with the alternate universe being populated by the newer additions to the franchise and the old guard passing the torch.

    I am not going to miss that.

    ETA: I loved the Marvel intro montage of Stan Lee's cameos. He is already greatly missed.


    AFF









  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    ETA: I loved the Marvel intro montage of Stan Lee's cameos. He is already greatly missed.

    Yeah, that was nice. Though a funny thing from my vantage point was that I doubt even 10% of the audience in Korea will know who they were talking about. I sometimes discuss comic books with my students, and despite the absolute stratospheric popularity of Marvel films over here, I almost always end up having to explain who Stan Lee was, and that they've probably all seen him in the movies.

    On that note...
    And I guess that cameo on the subway will be his last?



  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited March 18
    Cold Pursuit

    Unfortunately timed Liam Neeson vigilante film. I agree with the critics who said that it's essentially a knock-off of the Coen Brothers, with a bit of early Tarantino tossed in. Improbable portrayals of gangster life, quirky cops a la Fargo, noble savage aboriginal peoples etc etc.

    All that said, I'd still recommend it if you're hard up for a flick, probably better than your run-of-the-mill popcorn fare. And it'll probably be the last time Neeson gets to do his vigilante routine on screen.

  • Chorister wrote: »
    Only just got around to seeing 'Bohemian Rhapsody' which I enjoyed very much. Thanks for reminding me that Fisherman's Friends' is another must-see.

    We also got around to watching Bohemian Rhapsody at the weekend. Particularly liked the music, performances and band member interactions.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    I saw the Spanish film Everybody Knows (aka "Todos lo saben"), starring Javier Bardem and Penélope Cruz. It's all very well done, beautifully acted and handsomely filmed, and I came out of the cinema feeling totes depressed. Virtue not only fails to triumph, it is trampled underfoot. My mood was not sufficiently robust to withstand the movie's despair.

  • stetson wrote: »
    Cold Pursuit

    Unfortunately timed Liam Neeson vigilante film. I agree with the critics who said that it's essentially a knock-off of the Coen Brothers, with a bit of early Tarantino tossed in. Improbable portrayals of gangster life, quirky cops a la Fargo, noble savage aboriginal peoples etc etc.

    All that said, I'd still recommend it if you're hard up for a flick, probably better than your run-of-the-mill popcorn fare. And it'll probably be the last time Neeson gets to do his vigilante routine on screen.

    If anything this is a knock-off of the Stellan Skarsgard movie In order of disappearance. Having seen that movie I do not feel the need to see American remake (rip-off) as I do not believe they are better than the original.
  • Martin54Martin54 Shipmate
    Just dared to watch the Soderbergh Solaris. Not bad. Although the paint dried a little to quickly.
  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    edited March 24
    Back on the old Ship, on the movie thread, I said I was looking forward to seeing this movie: The Public

    Well it's finally coming out in theaters in April! I can't wait!
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    edited March 26
    Rossweisse wrote: »
    I saw the Spanish film Everybody Knows (aka "Todos lo saben") ... and I came out of the cinema feeling totes depressed.
    I will look this up. I am partial to a depressing film.

    Not this week, though. French Film Festival time here. First trip to the movies in NZ, and I made it 2 for 2 days. Tonight I saw The Fall of the American Empire, a film shot in Québec that looks at the effect of (rampant?) capitalism on society, through a guy with a PhD who is a courier stumbling across the massive proceeds of a cash robbery and taking it. Rather violent in parts, including when he finds the cash (no spoilers). But also comedic. The guy in front of me (who came in late so I leaned in and gave him and his partner a quick summary of the two major events that had happened) turned around to tell me at the end that he really liked it...I did too. Great actors and an enjoyable story.

    Last night, I saw the comedy The Trouble with You. As some directors are wont, this comedy also had some rather serious parts -- it concerns a young man wrongly gaoled, who comes out rather broken. The widow of the policeman who put him away seeks to help him. Chaos and hilarity ensue in equal measure. A very silly film -- I found it perfect for a Monday night after a busy first day of the week back at work.
  • Mama Agatha is 15 minute file about a Ghanian woman who teaches immigrant women in the Netherlands to ride bicycles. It was made in 2015, released for free viewing for International Women's Day. It won awards (scroll down).

    She says some very amusing things (to my mind) and shares such kindness and patience. I saw it at a film festival, and thought I'd share the link now that it may be seen for free.
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    I saw Fighting with my Family Sunday and I found it lots of fun. Yeah, it is cliched but sometimes life is like that. It is about a real Norwich wrestling family and what happens when the kids get a chance to try out for the WWE. This may be old news to you Brits, but it was fresh to me and pretty darned funny when the movie went for laughs. Even my cynical movie friend liked it and she never likes any movie that is "heartwarming". :lol:
  • A Feminine ForceA Feminine Force Shipmate
    edited March 26
    Martin54 wrote: »
    Just dared to watch the Soderbergh Solaris. Not bad. Although the paint dried a little to quickly.

    You do know this was Tarkovsky's film before it was Soderbergh's, right? Tarkovsky of the fifteen minute camera pan.

    Either you love his work or you sleep through it.

    I love it.

    AFF
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    The Mule

    I think I'm running out of ways to say that Clint Eastwood's recent films present an offbeat take on the traditional notions of heroic masculinity, but in any case, this may very well be the last time I have to say that. The guy will be pushing 90 in a couple of months.

    Eastwood directs and stars as an elderly man of respectable if precarious social standing who gets recruited by a Mexican coke cartel to haul their product from the border to Chicago. To its credit, the film does not skirt around the issue of the mule's skin privilege, since it is shown that
    while he is allowed to traipse about the southern USA with his contraband, innocent latinos are stopped and searched by cops targeting the drug gang he's working for, but who would never suspect a white dude. (Admittedly, the script treats this more with sardonic amusement than thundering condemnation, though that's not always an ineffective tone to take.)

    According to what I've read on-line, a lot of the details are inaccurate in comparison to the real-life events, but the embellishements do make for an entertaining story. For a film about a violent criminal underworld, I will say that it is rather short on darkness, set mostly on the dusty, sunny highways of the USA, and featuring relatively little suspense. Almost certainly more realistic than the schoolboy fantasies of most post-Tarantino gangster flicks, howver.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited March 29
    Carny

    Finally found this on You Tube, decades after being slightly intrigued by the ads for it in my local newspaper. Seemed like one of those sophisticated movies that kids my age weren't allowed to see.

    Written(partly), produced by, and starring Robbie Roberston(of "Night They Drove Ol' Dixie Down" fame and ongoing Scorsese collaborator), this is basically another entrant into the pantheon of late 1970s explorations of blue-collar Americana, set in that most blue-collar American of settings, a traveling carnival.

    Jodie Foster stars as a teenaged runaway who hooks up with a guy(Gary Busey) who does an "evil clown" routine in a carnival dunk tank, causing some personal and business friction with the carnival's money man, played by Robinson. Strip shows, sideshow freaks, mob payoffs and other seamy aspects of low-budget circus life all play leading roles in the story.

    On the whole, this is probably more about ambience than plot. But the evil clown's manical taunting of cusotmers(starts at about 5:50) and Jodie Foster's sapphic seduction of "string-pullers"(starts at about 1:07:50) are worth the click. Granted, the latter seems to be at least as much about audience titilation as about anything else, but what the hey.

    EDIT: Oh, and that download is a little strange, with the optics taking on an erratic, swervy quality that I don't think was part of the original film. Didn't much effect my viewing enjoyment, though, in fact it kind of meshes with the overall mood.
  • Caught up with a couple of Pixar films in the last month (as I don't have children).

    Finally saw Finding Nemo. Funny and moving with fantastic animation, as always.

    Inside Out last night. The one from the viewpoint of the girl's emotions. Man. I laughed out loud a number of times but it was the effects on my heart that were stronger. I had to pause the film briefly as my tears were making my eyes sting (but it didn't rip my heart out the way the beginning of Up did (still an amazing film too). Thoroughly recommended (only 4 years late is very recent for me - I haven't seen Frozen either - remember, no children).

    Also enjoyed watching The Fly again. I'd only ever seen it on VHS so to see it, even without HD, was a treat. Body horror.

    No, be afraid. Very afraid.
  • BelisariusBelisarius Admin Emeritus
    Finally saw Finding Nemo. Funny and moving with fantastic animation, as always.
    During a nature show I once saw about species whose individuals can change their sex, one scientist mentioned "if Finding Nemo had real clownfish, Nemo's father would turn female and eventually mate with him."
  • Mr ClingfordMr Clingford Shipmate
    edited April 12
    Belisarius wrote: »
    Finally saw Finding Nemo. Funny and moving with fantastic animation, as always.
    During a nature show I once saw about species whose individuals can change their sex, one scientist mentioned "if Finding Nemo had real clownfish, Nemo's father would turn female and eventually mate with him."
    We long for the time when our cultures welcome a LGBTrans love/ sex plotline in a main Hollywood film. That would be quite a film! Even if it's 'only' cartoon fish. (Although I do remember seeing The Crying Game in the cinema with no spoilers.)
  • BelisariusBelisarius Admin Emeritus
    edited April 12
    Once any incest angles are removed. ;)
  • Yeah, good point! Forgot about that bit!

    Back to the drawing board.
  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    I finally got to see The Public. It's only in a few theaters, two in NYC, in Manhattan, but it was worth the effort. I loved it.
  • MMMMMM Shipmate
    We watched Whisky Galore for the first time in some years last night. It never fails to amuse, a lovely film, no matter how many times I see it.

    MMM
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    At this point in my life, most of my favorite films are from Pixar. "Inside Out" is one of their best, and that's saying something.
  • DardaDarda Shipmate
    MMM wrote: »
    We watched Whisky Galore for the first time in some years last night. It never fails to amuse, a lovely film, no matter how many times I see it.

    MMM

    Presumably the original 1949 black and white version. I recently watched the 2016 remake, expecting to be disappointed. However, I found it followed the original storyline and thoroughly enjoyed it.
  • MMMMMM Shipmate
    Yes, the original. I didn’t know there had been a remake until I saw something on the internet the other day. Interesting you enjoyed it: I just assumed it would be disappointing as well. I don’t understand why you would remake it in the first place.

    MMM
  • McMaverickMcMaverick Shipmate
    edited April 21
    I’m another one with Amazon Prime. I used to have LoveFilm which was £2 more a month but you got the latest movies free and much quicker, albeit by post on disc. Being frugal (read tight) I don’t often pay the extra cash for the latest movies, I mostly wait until they’re free or really cheap. This has led me to watch some fascinating movies that I wouldn’t otherwise have watched, as I scan through the free movies, including ‘foreign’ subtitled ones. Most recently, I watched ‘Behind the Blue Door’, a Polish movie that I found powerful and enchanting. I’d also recommend ‘The Song of the Sea’, an animation. If you haven’t seen ‘Remember’ with Christopher Plummer, I’d heartily recommend that - very powerful, clever and beautifully acted and filmed.
  • McMaverickMcMaverick Shipmate
    edited April 21
    I forgot to mention ‘The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society’. Maybe it’s been discussed earlier in the thread/on a previous one. I loved it! I don’t usually watch ‘romantic’ films, but this was certainly far far more than a story about a person finding a soulmate.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    Ok, for those of you who like the Marvel movies, End Game is a real ride! Daughter-Unit and I watched Infinity War together (the first part of the two-part movies) on Tuesday, to make sure we remembered all the details in preparation for last night's event.

    We laughed! We sobbed! We were confused!!

    End Game starts slowly, which I think is a good metaphor for what our heroes are experiencing. Then the pace picks up speed until it goes full tilt! (That's not the end of the movie, btw!!)

    I'm not going to tell you what happens, and you can't make me!
    However, there are just two little things:
    Thor looks *different*
    and (don't look at this \/ one if you don't want a hint of how things might end up...it's just pretty funny!)
    Asgardians of the Galaxy!!!

    I hope those of you who see this movie will enjoy it as much as I did.

    Oh, there's a subtle *something* after the credits. I'm trying to figure out what it means!
  • McMaverickMcMaverick Shipmate
    I've only just got to watch Black Panther - I was waiting for the Prime price to come down. What an amazing film! I love all the Marvel films, but this was on another plane on so many levels. Such storytelling and so many important themes, without being remotely didactic or patronising. So refreshing to see a majority black cast and so many strong female characters in one movie. Loved this film so much.
  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    Finally saw Captain Marvel today. It's great to see a movie with strong women characters talking to each other not about men (the Bechtel test). A whole lot of fun.
  • ClimacusClimacus Shipmate
    I recently joined the local film society and headed out tonight to see my first film with them, the 1986 Finnish drama-comedy "Shadows in Paradise".

    At 76 minutes it did seem rather short (how quick we get used to the long ones these days!), and it took me a little while to settle in, but I was soon into this film about 2 people coming together while various misfortune and trouble surrounds them. The filming was "simple", but very effective; and reminded me how often people smoked back then (and the hairstyles! 😁) A ride of emotions, and an enjoyable one.
  • HarryotomHarryotom Shipmate
    Yes, watching that really weirded me out too.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited April 29
    First Reformed

    Okay, I guess I'm "in the club" now?

    I really liked this, but I'm gonna start off with a couple negatives...

    (POSSIBLE WEAK SPOILERS AHEAD)

    I've always found "Why bring children into a world like this?" a rather lame moral dilemma, and I happen to know that it predates concern over global warming by at least a decade. When Mike Stivic was moaning about it to Gloria on All In The Family, mid-70s, I believe the specified dreads were war and pollution.

    However, I can appreciate that this motif was used just to kickstart the pastor's reflection upon the activists' actions, not as a serious issue for the audience to ponder.

    Somewhat related to this, I thought the film at times veered close to being a "message movie", though again, the environmental themes were arguably just being used as a springboard to examining the pastor's attitude toward, and eventual relationship with, political violence. Though, admittedly, if the script had used a conservative issue to motivate the pastor(eg. anti-abortion), it would probably have alienated a lot of the target audience.

    Apart from all that, as a fan of 1970s "film-school" era cinema, it's hard not to situate this in the context of other works by Paul Schrader(as writer and/or director) in terms of the general plot trajectory, ie. individual pushed by a combination of pre-existing psychological instability and moral outrage into a supposedly redemptive act of violence. It might be an exaggeration to see the pastor as Travis Bickle in a clerical collar(with the activist as the prostitute and Balq as Palantine, since I'm on a roll here), but not too much of one, I'd say.

    (I'll resist any last temptations to throw in more such comparisons, don't want things to get too hardcore here.)

    Not that I have anything against artists repeating themselves, and in this film, the old themes worked quite well set in a new environment, one not commonly explored in mainstream cinema. On that note, I especially appreciated the efforts of the script to get the religion right, though that's probably to be expected, given Schrader's well=known Calvinist background. (Cue a flood of knowledgable shipmates telling me all the things the movie got wrong.)

    The issue of a small church having a somewhat ambiguous relationship with a larger "megachurch" was an interesting one to see treated in a mainstream film, given that most of the time, screenwriters don't even know enough about religion to avoid putting Sacred Hearts in Baptist churches.

    And on pure aesthetic grounds, I thought the last scene was pretty amazing, scored to that hymn being sung in the church.
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