Heaven: At the Movies

TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
edited January 16 in Limbo
A general-purpose thread to discuss movies we've seen, loved, hated, felt the need to talk about. You can find the old-boards thread here if you want to pick up a thread from earlier discussion.
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  • I finally saw Young Frankenstein at the weekend. Some of it made me laugh. More of the jokes didn't really tickle. It worked as a drama for me, though, and Gene Wilder's performance was strong. Putting on the Ritz, anyone?
  • Yesterday I picked up a special edition of Life Magazine, celebrating 75 years of Casablanca. It is still my all-time favourite film and one I watch regularly. As time goes by(!), I have become ever more impressed with the performance of Claude Rains as Captain Renault. He's actually a real creep but ends up somehow being loveable. But the highlight is still Bogie's performance. How neither Bogie or Rains ended up with an Oscar is still beyond my ken.
  • MamacitaMamacita Shipmate
    Agreed, Rufus T. Firefly. My all-time favorite film. I still get all choked up when they sing La Marseillaise in Rick's bar.
  • I think that my favourite part is still the moment when Rick sees Ilsa. Bogie's minute but unmissable twitch of pain is just perfect. Nothing said and no big deal made of it. It's just there and tells you all you need to know.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    The Post

    I actually didn't like this quite as much as everyone else seemed to. Like The People Vs. Larry Flynt, it's basically about a First Amendment case where the climactic decision is brought about by the work of the SCOTUS, not anything the main characters themselves do. With the difference that, at least Larry Flynt(as portrayed on-screen) was an amusingly eccentric individual, whereas the Beltway types who populate The Post are, well, kind of boring.

    I'll acknowledge that it was interesting to consider that, in publishing the Pentagon Papers, Katherine Graham and her compnay were very much damaging the personal interests of people in their very own social circle, though this wasn't quite enough to sustain the momentum of interest for me.

    And for the love of God, scoring the Vietnam scenes to CCR?! When you're the director who supposedly crafted "the greatest battle scenes ever filmed" in Saving Private Ryan, surely you can come up with something more original than that.
  • LeoLeo Shipmate
    https://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com/2018/03/03/i-daniel-blake/I Daniel Blake about Tory mistreatment of benefits claimants.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    edited March 2018
    Hmm...
    Leo, your link doesn't work for me, and I'm not savvy enough (yet!) to figure out how to fix it!
    jedijudy
    trying to be a Helpful Host
  • For want of a colon the link was undone.
  • I saw Three Billboards... last evening with some friends. Possibly - just possibly - the best movie I’ve ever seen. When the credits rolled, I could quite happily have gone back to the beginning and seen it all again. And again. The justice vs revenge trope which has been at the core of Western drama since its beginning was made beautifully human by every single member of the cast. Genuinely awesome.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    Good job, lilbuddha! :smile:
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Red Sparrow

    Fast-paced post-Cold War spy thriller that apparently wishes it was set in the Cold War. Jennifer Lawrence is an ex-ballerina, training and then working as a sexual seductress for Russian intelligence. Jeremy Irons has a bit part playing someone or other in the agency, but mostly just being the Distinguished British Actor Classing Up A Hollywood B Movie.

    Yes, it's all as cheezy as it sounds, but pretty good espionage-flick fun, and I can report that if one of your short-term goals is seeing Jennifer Lawrence in various states of semi-nudity and bodily positions, this is the movie for YOU.
  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    I went to see Black Panther this weekend, and enjoyed it. I have loved the character since the early 1970s when Don McGregor was writing the "Panther's Rage" epic in the pages of Jungle Action comics. McGregor created the character of revolutionary Erik Killmonger, although the movie version is quite a bit different in terms of background and motivation.

    I do find it interesting that the movie has been praised with showing that a movie with a black hero and a mostly black cast could be a huge blockbuster...because McGregor's book faced similar obstacles. At the time (1973-74) it was considered "ridiculous" that a comic book could feature a black hero with a primarily black supporting cast. But "Panther's Rage" has endured as one of the great comic book epics.

    The movie does not bear a lot of resemblance to the comic storyline. Some thematic similarities, but different events and plots. Although there are a couple neat echoes from the comic, such as
    Killmonger throwing T'Challa off of Warrior Falls, which was the cliffhanger between [iJungle Action[/]i #6 & 7.

    Perhaps I should explain about the comic's title. In the early 1970s, Marvel was making a few extra dollars by reprinting stories that Marvel's predecessor company had put out in the 1950s. This included jungle-based stories, which generally featured the old trope of the white man or woman protecting African primitives. McGregor had been assigned to proofread these jungle reprints for Jungle Action and he voiced regret that Marvel couldn't do an actual black African hero instead. Then it was announced that certain reprint titles (including JA) would begin to feature new material. And, as Marvel had Black Panther and had already established that his hidden kingdom was in Africa, McGregor was assigned to write the series. So that is how T'Challa ended up having his stories in a title called Jungle Action. The covers did put the words "Jungle Action featuring" in much smaller type than "The Black Panther," so at a quick glance it did look like the book's title was "The Black Panther."

    I also watched Piccadilly (1929), featuring Anna May Wong, who is a rare example of an Asian actress being permitted starring roles in the early 20th century. After a number of stereotypical roles in the U.S., she came over to Europe and England and making films there. Piccadilly is one of her best. Technically, the lead actress was Gilda Gray, but from the moment Wong is seen dancing in the night club's scullery, the movie belongs to her. The plot is simple:
    she advances from scullery worker to a night club sensation, displacing the prior dancer (Gilda Gray) both on stage and in the affections of the club owner. And to the displeasure of Wong's own boyfriend. The romantic tensions lead to tragedy.

    Interesting historic point: in the U.S., because of anti-miscegenation laws, Wong, as an Asian woman, was not permitted to kiss a white man on screen--even if that white man was playing an Asian part! The fact that the actor was actually white was enough, regardless of the role played on screen. It was restrictions like this that partly motivated Wong to leave the U.S. and make films elsewhere.

    And make no mistake: she was a star! Later, Anna May Wong would star in a TV mystery series on the old Dumont Network called "The Gallery of Madame Liu-Tsong." She played an art dealer who gets involved in detective work and international intrigue. It was the first American TV series with an Asian-American lead. Sadly, there are no known extant copies of any of the ten episodes that were made.
  • LibsLibs Shipmate
    Adeodatus wrote: »
    I saw Three Billboards... last evening with some friends. Possibly - just possibly - the best movie I’ve ever seen. When the credits rolled, I could quite happily have gone back to the beginning and seen it all again. And again. The justice vs revenge trope which has been at the core of Western drama since its beginning was made beautifully human by every single member of the cast. Genuinely awesome.

    Agree. But then again - we've got a film festival going on here - in just over 24 hours, I've seen that, and Lady Bird and The Shape of Water. Three of the finest movies I've ever seen. A friend saw me coming out of the last one ('Three Billboards...') and said: "You look stunned!" I was - I feel as though I've been pole-axed.

    I don't envy the Oscar judges.
  • I saw "A Wrinkle in Time" the other night at a screening. Although some things were jarring for someone who grew up with the book(s) (c'est moi), once you get past the idea of a giant Oprah urging on the heroine, it's pretty good stuff.
  • Red Sparrow
    Not an enjoyable film. Even the 20 something children didn't enjoy it - one said Jennifer Lawrence was about as sexy as a hatstand.

    Where to start? The plot is very old-fashioned - and has been done before, and better (its the same basic premise as that of the girl in From Russia with Love. Jennifer Lawrence does the accent well enough but the lowered eyes and smoky make-up is formulaic and a lazy way to imply sex appeal.

    As for on-screen chemistry: there should be some between JL and Joel Eggerton but there isn't - in fact JL's scenes with the man meant to be her uncle have more of a frisson.

    Frankly I found this film exploitative, formulaic and dull. I'm told Ms Lawrence is considered to be a fine actress but I'm not finding her to be so on this showing. I'd give it a maximum of 2 stars out of 5.
  • Red Sparrow
    Frankly I found this film exploitative, formulaic and dull. I'm told Ms Lawrence is considered to be a fine actress but I'm not finding her to be so on this showing. I'd give it a maximum of 2 stars out of 5.
    She is. I would not let your dislike of this film influence the watching of her other work. With the caveat that some of them are pure popcorn flicks.
  • LibsLibs Shipmate
    I missed Loveless, thanks to the snow. Today I saw Dark River, which was really, really good, but might only appeal to Brits.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    Rossweisse wrote: »
    I saw "A Wrinkle in Time" the other night at a screening. Although some things were jarring for someone who grew up with the book(s) (c'est moi), once you get past the idea of a giant Oprah urging on the heroine, it's pretty good stuff.

    Hoping to see it this week -- as a devoted fan of the book I'm very interested to see what they'll do with it. I've liked the trailers.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Red Sparrow
    Not an enjoyable film. Even the 20 something children didn't enjoy it - one said Jennifer Lawrence was about as sexy as a hatstand.

    Where to start? The plot is very old-fashioned - and has been done before, and better (its the same basic premise as that of the girl in From Russia with Love. Jennifer Lawrence does the accent well enough but the lowered eyes and smoky make-up is formulaic and a lazy way to imply sex appeal.

    As for on-screen chemistry: there should be some between JL and Joel Eggerton but there isn't - in fact JL's scenes with the man meant to be her uncle have more of a frisson.

    Frankly I found this film exploitative, formulaic and dull. I'm told Ms Lawrence is considered to be a fine actress but I'm not finding her to be so on this showing. I'd give it a maximum of 2 stars out of 5.

    Hey, I'm sorry if you watched that under my recommendation. Especially because, after I posted my comments, I kind of re-considered my description of it as "fast-paced". It does kind of get bogged down in a few places.

    I did warn you about the cheesiness however, but that might have left you with the impression that it's more campily entertaining than it really is. One reviewer quoted on wiki said something to the effect that it's lowbrow, but never enough to become trashy(in a good way). I can kind of see what he or she was getting at, though I was still overall okay with the film.

    (Caveat: I have limited access to English-language films over here, and even less to anything with even remote socioploitical significance, so I might have a tendency to be overly appreciative of what I do get.)

  • TwilightTwilight Shipmate
    Adeodatus wrote: »
    I saw Three Billboards... last evening with some friends. Possibly - just possibly - the best movie I’ve ever seen. When the credits rolled, I could quite happily have gone back to the beginning and seen it all again. And again. The justice vs revenge trope which has been at the core of Western drama since its beginning was made beautifully human by every single member of the cast. Genuinely awesome.

    I read this yesterday, jumped in the car, and got it from Red Box. Yes. It was riveting. I re-watched it before returning it this morning. Aside from the original story and the great acting, I loved seeing the redemption arc on two such --well -- irredeemable characters. There's hope for all of us!
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    Libs wrote: »
    I missed Loveless, thanks to the snow. Today I saw Dark River, which was really, really good, but might only appeal to Brits.

    I just saw Loveless. A very well acted bottomless well of misery. You get to see how Mom gets where she is emotionally but not Dad who also has big problems. And their poor kid born to their marriage... :scream:
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

    MILD SPOILERS

    Yeah, it was good. I'd give it about an 8/10, for originality and interest. A couple of reasons I'm not going higher...

    1. It's one of those movies where you can sometimes tell the dialogue is written by professional screenwriters. That's okay if you've settled in for some Hollywood cookie-cutter schlock; not so much when you've been led to expect a modicum of realism.

    2. Possibly related to the above, while the jokes were often pretty funny, they sometimes seemed sort of grafted onto the proceedings artifically.

    3. The bad-cop-redeemed is a bit of a cliche, not entirely worthy of a film with these types of aspirations.

    And, while it's not really a criticism, but did anyone else think that this basically ends up being a vigilante film for hispters? Not entirely Death Wish 9, since there is a certain amount of moral ambiguity around the characters' actions, but we're not exactly supposed to be appalled when she suggests that all men in the country be forced to give DNA samples, nor when she makes the final trip to Idaho with the cop.

    Granted, the former I suppose can be rationalized as just a typical reaction of someone who has been seriously victimzed by crime, and not neccessarily endorsed by the script.
  • TwilightTwilight Shipmate
    More mild spoilers.

    Stetson, I agree with you that some parts seemed grafted on, her speech to the Catholic priest, for instance, seemed tossed in and a little too perfectly articulated for an off the cuff rant.

    On the other hand, I do think we were supposed to be appalled at much of her behavior. She was often hateful, ungrateful, and illogical regarding her expectations about what law enforcement could do for her. I think she was just locked in the anger stage of grief for most of the movie and beginning to come out of it by the end.

    As for revenge, well she never did get it and it sounded to me as if they were both backing down on the reason for their trip to Idaho before the movie ended.

    I would go 8/10, too.
  • I saw "Love, Simon" at a local multiplex. I found it sweet, bordering on the saccharine. It's not a great film (and the book it's based on is not a great book), and it's about ten years too late to feel revolutionary. But it's cute, reasonably entertaining and very well-intentioned.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Twilight wrote: »
    More mild spoilers.

    Stetson, I agree with you that some parts seemed grafted on, her speech to the Catholic priest, for instance, seemed tossed in and a little too perfectly articulated for an off the cuff rant.

    Yeah, that sort of bugged me too. Mostly because the town didn't seem like the kind of place where the Catholic Church(as opposed to bible-belt protestantism) would be a force so powerful that the priest could speak to her with the kind of authority he did. Maybe I'm just stereotyping rural Missouri(or maybe not), but my impression was that the writers made the local clergyman Catholic in order to justify bringing the topic of sexual abuse into it. See my earlier point about the film reflecting hipster preoccupations.

    (And no, I'm not saying that only hipsters care about clerical abuse, far from it. But, let's be honest, if we're talking about which demographics most enjoy seeing self-righteous religious authorites taken down a peg or two, young liberal-arts graduates is gonna be higher on the list than late middle-aged accountants.)

    I've gotta get back to work, I'll try to write more later.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    I saw "Love, Simon" at a local multiplex. I found it sweet, bordering on the saccharine. It's not a great film (and the book it's based on is not a great book), and it's about ten years too late to feel revolutionary. But it's cute, reasonably entertaining and very well-intentioned.

    The point my daughter, who's 17 and a big reader of YA novels, made (which I'm sure others have made too) is that it's nice we've reached the point that gay teens can have a fun, fluffy romance novel/movie that doesn't have to be A Great And Important Drama ... just a fun little popcorn date-movie and/or a quick light read about a gay kid falling in love. As there are thousands of such books and movies about straight kids that can be as mediocre as they want to be.
  • edited March 2018
    Trudy wrote: »
    I saw "Love, Simon" at a local multiplex. I found it sweet, bordering on the saccharine. It's not a great film (and the book it's based on is not a great book), and it's about ten years too late to feel revolutionary. But it's cute, reasonably entertaining and very well-intentioned.

    The point my daughter, who's 17 and a big reader of YA novels, made (which I'm sure others have made too) is that it's nice we've reached the point that gay teens can have a fun, fluffy romance novel/movie that doesn't have to be A Great And Important Drama ... just a fun little popcorn date-movie and/or a quick light read about a gay kid falling in love. As there are thousands of such books and movies about straight kids that can be as mediocre as they want to be.

    I don't disagree. There have been light and fluffy gay romcoms before, but they've usually been terrible. Even The Curiosity of Chance, which was definitely one of the better attempts at making a gay high school comedy, had a very small release and definite amateur feel (it was filmed on rather less than 1/10th the budget of "Love, Simon").

    And, although "Call Me By Your Name" is a beautiful and ultimately optimistic film, it doesn't share the same sort of appeal to suburban teens (and their parents).

    [Link fixed by your friendly, neighborhood Heaven Host, jedijudy]
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Twilight wrote: »

    On the other hand, I do think we were supposed to be appalled at much of her behavior. She was often hateful, ungrateful, and illogical regarding her expectations about what law enforcement could do for her. I think she was just locked in the anger stage of grief for most of the movie and beginning to come out of it by the end.

    As for revenge, well she never did get it and it sounded to me as if they were both backing down on the reason for their trip to Idaho before the movie ended.

    I would go 8/10, too.

    Well, like I said, it didn't remind me of a vigilante film along the lines of Death Wish, more like Death Sentence or The Brave One, which take a more nuanced approach to the issues involved.

    MAJOR SPOILERS

    And I think we were definitely being set up to enjoy the thought of the bragging military- rapist getting his head blown off by the vengeful duo after they reached Idaho. The denoument allowed everyone to fantasize about how it all turns out, by artifically cutting the story off when it did. I actually think that ending sort of qualified as cheating.

    (I'll be totally honest here and say I was disappointed we didn't get to see him die a painful death.)



  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    I finally watched Black Panther also. I'm not a big fan of superhero films, but after quite a lot of friends took many (mainly black) children to see it, I wanted to go too.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Phantom Thread

    As I think I wrote on the old board, when a film director gets to the point where he feels compelled to create art about the artistic process itself, it's maybe time for him to start thinking about doing something else.

    Granted, you can debate how much this really is a meditation upon the artist/muse relationship, since the story doesn't feature too many scenes of Alma modeling for Reynolds, and you can possibly see it as just a romantic relationship, but it's hard to escape the creative setting. Apart from that aspect, it's possibly just another Paul Thomas Anderson portrayal of messed up masculinity with an unevenly muted violent streak, as in Punch Drunk Love and The Master.

    And I'm guessing Anderson REALLY liked DDL's posture and mannerisms in Lincoln.
  • LeoLeo Shipmate
    The new https://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com/2018/03/23/mary-magdalene/ Mary Magdalene film - really slow and dreary.
  • EigonEigon Shipmate
    My Young Man came to stay with a stash of movies to watch, so I have had fun watching:
    Dr Strange (enjoyable superhero stuff). I thought the climactic confrontation between Strange and the Big Bad was exactly what Doctor Who would have done.
    Thor: Ragnarok (enjoyable superhero stuff). Loved the rock guy, and the stuff about Asgard's hidden past ("Where do you think all the gold came from, anyway?") - and Heimdall finally had something heroic to do.
    Midsummer Night's Dream produced by Russell T Davies (very funny, very gay). Matt Lucas was good as Bottom - I wasn't quite sure about Athens as a fascist dictatorship, though.
    The Tempest with Helen Mirren as Prospera (superb version, I was highly impressed).


  • stetson wrote: »
    Twilight wrote: »
    More mild spoilers.

    Stetson, I agree with you that some parts seemed grafted on, her speech to the Catholic priest, for instance, seemed tossed in and a little too perfectly articulated for an off the cuff rant.

    Yeah, that sort of bugged me too. Mostly because the town didn't seem like the kind of place where the Catholic Church(as opposed to bible-belt protestantism) would be a force so powerful that the priest could speak to her with the kind of authority he did. Maybe I'm just stereotyping rural Missouri(or maybe not), but my impression was that the writers made the local clergyman Catholic in order to justify bringing the topic of sexual abuse into it. See my earlier point about the film reflecting hipster preoccupations.

    Or because the writer (singular) is Irish. Some of the details of the town don't really ring true to me, but then realism is not a hallmark of McDonagh's work.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited March 2018

    Or because the writer (singular) is Irish. Some of the details of the town don't really ring true to me, but then realism is not a hallmark of McDonagh's work.

    Yeah, the only other thing I've seen by him is In Bruges, and it seemed to have a sort of fairy-tale gangster quality, with the dwarf thrown in for exotic effect. The same actor's presence in Three Billboards seemed slightly less exploitative.

    But I didn't think the priest was put in to give any sense of irrealism about the scene, just, like I said, to prompt the speech from the character about sexual abuse. And I suppose a Catholic priest might be some peoples' default choice for a clerical character.

    And now...

    LOGAN LUCKY

    It's not clear to me why Stephen Soderbergh would want to make a down-home reboot of the Oceans films. But make it he did, complete with deliberately inappropriate use of
    "And introducing..." in the end credits. If you like capers(personally, I usually find them a little hard to follow and the genre is kinda wearing thin anyway), you might want to give this a look.

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited March 2018
    error
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Our Kind Of Traitor

    Fairly watchable Le Carre spy flick, with good characterizations and a coincidentally ultra-topical background of British collusion with the laundering of Russian crime proceeds. Even without recent events in Salisbury, that would still be a fairly relevent topic, and it's always impressive to see how Le Carre, in his late 70s at the time of writing, manages to stay current.

    Also, nice to see Russian gangsters used a plot motif out of a plausible connection to the storyline, rather than just because they've replaced Italians as Hollywood's standby ethnicity for crime figures.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Tangerine

    Gritty, quasi-verite-ish piece about transgendered prostitutes, an Armenian cabbie, and other assorted street denizens in Los Angeles, filmed on a cellphone. Fairly good performances all around, though I wasn't quite buying one of the second-tier characterizations.
  • TukaiTukai Shipmate
    Human Flow , a documentary by Ai Weiwei about refugees around the world.

    Although I knew already about most of the cases, the visuals were graphic , except for some wobbly hand-held scenes, especially about the scale of some of the camps and the physically inhospitable locations many are in.

    An interview with a member of Jordan's royal family offered a note of hope. She pointed out that Jordan had been a cross-roads for people from all over the Middle East since Roman times, so it was part of their heritage and human duty to take in the thousands who had fled to there. Refugees, mainly from Palestine and Syria, now comprise about 1/4 of the population of Jordan! .
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Ready Player One

    Nostalgia porn, with about one 1980s reference every five seconds, often in the form of in-jokes about movies. Most of this is presumably justified by having the creator of the mega virtual-reality world being a child of the 80s, but you have to think that, by the year 2045, when most people alive will have been born after that decade, consumers would revolt against an artificial-reality focussed largely on that time period. But I guess even after the social-media revolution, people will still be willing to live in a cyberworld with content based entirely on someone else's personal preferences.

    The extensive sequence quoting a certain early 80s horror movie are technically first-rate, unsurprising I suppose, given that Spielberg claims to have watched that film something like 25 times(and probably more since he gave that interview over a decade ago). But like the rest of the film, it really doesn't add up to much, except for an opportunity for those in-the-know to nod along at all the visually verbatim quotes.

  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Eigon wrote: »
    Dr Strange (enjoyable superhero stuff). I thought the climactic confrontation between Strange and the Big Bad was exactly what Doctor Who would have done.

    Got round to watching that last night from our stash of recorded films. The buildings moving, folding etc was an original take on the usual cgi exploding and collapsing.

    Oh, and I want one of those levitating capes.
  • EigonEigon Shipmate
    I liked the cape, too!
  • TukaiTukai Shipmate
    I bet our 3 year old grandson would like one too.
    He's currently going through a "Batman" phase, though what he really relates to is the kids TV series "PJ Masks" (which features kids turning into superheros of a sort, after they put on their PJs at night).
  • Gill HGill H Shipmate
    With the demise of 'Lovefilm' we have joined 'Cinema Paradiso' which sends you DVDs through the post. (Better choice of films than any of the streaming services.)

    Our first rental was 'A Street Cat Named Bob', not least because since we started taking our cat for walks in the park, everyone asks us whether we've seen it.

    It takes a few liberties with the story as told in the book - there's an almost-romance with a kooky vegan thrown in, plus certain events which seemed put in to give some satisfying story arcs. However, Luke Treadaway is an engaging lead, and Bob the cat (played mostly by the real Bob, plus some stand-ins) is a delight.

    It doesn't shy away from the realities of drug addiction and homelessness, but it's not too in-your-face a la Trainspotting either.

    Nice cameo from the author at the end, too.
  • I too am a member of Cinema Paradiso which I had not heard till my partner found it.
    I think It was always Amazons intention to close down the dvd rental.
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    I saw The Divine Order last night, a film about the fight for women's suffrage, set in in a small town in Switzerland in 1971(!). I vaguely knew that Swiss women came to the vote late, but geez! The main character, Nora, is a housewife who starts with one modest wish in life: she wants to get a part time job working in a travel agency, so she can do something other than house clean, wash socks, and be stuck at home with her cranky, bossy father-in-law. When her husband shoots that down claiming a husband has the legal right to nix his wife taking a job, the seeds of rebellion are sown. The film is fairly light-hearted and the characters are well acted. It's worth seeing.
  • Just saw The Shape of Water and
    ,fucking Guillermo del Toro just cannot have a pure, unabiguously happy ending,
    it is very Guillermo del Toro. Essentially a very GdT remake of the The Creature from the Black Lagoon.
    Not so much a reworking of the original script, but a reworking of the concept.
    I enjoyed it, but it was very GdT. I don’t think one necessarily has to be a fan of his to like the film; but if you are, you will.
  • sabinesabine Shipmate
    Streamed The Florida Project last weekend. Very good film about the lives of people who live in residence motels (among many other things). No musical score which added to the docu-drama feel.
  • LeoLeo Shipmate
    Love, Simon - first gay coming of age Hollywood mainstream
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Lady Bird.

    Written and directed by Greta Gerwig, and it's hard not to think of the protagonist as a continuation of the characters that she's played in movies written and directed by other people(right down to having an interest in religion; she is shown as attending a Catholic church on her own, even after leaving parochial school). If you liked Damsels In Distress, Frances Ha, and Maggie's Plan, you'd probably like this.

    And I must say, I did not recognize Tracy Letts as the father. That was a convincing aging job.
This discussion has been closed.