Me No Speak Da Anglisch

While listening to a radio talk show, I suddenly realized how behind the times I am. I haven't kept up with current events English language. The term "expedited removal" sparked my interest. I did some research and discovered other gems of translation, mainly from government documents. You may have stumbled across some of these. Give a real-life translation that anyone could understand. I'll show you what I mean.
(an oldie) "alternate facts" = lies
"expedited removal" = We'll give ya ten minutes to get off our turf,
and don't come back. G'bye.
Have at it. I need language elevation!

Comments

  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    edited November 2018
    General Motors announced yesterday that it is shutting down a number of plants, laying off the workers employed therein, and discontinuing certain car models.

    Oops, sorry. My mistake. The plants are being "unallocated."
  • Good one, Mz Reckondwyth

  • King-sized
    If it's King Donald you're thinking of, it might not mean Extra-Large.
  • edited November 2018
    Apparently they reach out but I cannot feel their touch through their phone message.

    My asking for something might have been a problem, I'm glad they clarified it by telling me no problem instead of "you're welcome".
  • General Motors announced yesterday that it is shutting down a number of plants, laying off the workers employed therein, and discontinuing certain car models.

    Oops, sorry. My mistake. The plants are being "unallocated."

    Even Ms Amanda's version isn't free of euphemism
    laying off
    Sacking
    discontinuing
    (more tenuously) stopping making
  • SipechSipech Shipmate
    Another term for sacking is "back office synergies" - in a previous job, a public statement was made saying we were taking over a rival; the deal was sold to both sets of shareholders on the basis of these synergies. In a later statement, they outlined director bonuses (long term incentive plans) that were dependent upon the achievement of these synergies.

    In short, the more people lose their jobs, the bigger a bonus the directors get.

    My leaving interview may have included the phrase "morally reprehensible".
  • Fawkes Cat wrote: »
    Even Ms Amanda's version isn't free of euphemism
    laying off
    Sacking
    I can't say about UK usage of "sacking." We don't typically say that on this side of The Pond. But in usage here, there is a difference—at least in terms of cause—between being fired (which is what I usually assume is meant by "sacked") and being laid off.

    The primary effect, for the most part, is of course the same.

  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    The primary effect, for the most part, is of course the same.

    Except that if you have been laid off, you qualify for unemployment benefits. If you have been fired for cause (or if you resign) you do not.

  • Made redundant. = freeing someone up so s/he can search for a better job somewhere else.
  • Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    The primary effect, for the most part, is of course the same.

    Except that if you have been laid off, you qualify for unemployment benefits. If you have been fired for cause (or if you resign) you do not.
    Right. You also may have rehiring preferences, assistance finding a new job or a decent severance package.

    Which is why I said the primary effect is the same, that primary effect being that you don't have a job anymore.

  • Sipech wrote: »
    Another term for sacking is "back office synergies" - in a previous job, a public statement was made saying we were taking over a rival; the deal was sold to both sets of shareholders on the basis of these synergies. In a later statement, they outlined director bonuses (long term incentive plans) that were dependent upon the achievement of these synergies.

    In short, the more people lose their jobs, the bigger a bonus the directors get.

    My leaving interview may have included the phrase "morally reprehensible".

    Howabout "Stakeholder synergies"? Isn't it awkward to give a home to those who formerly owned an enterprise that no longer exists? Why are they not also made redundant?
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    From a church's mission statement "We ,,,do God’s work of social awareness, environmental consciousness, and spiritual growth." I hate mission-speak and applying it to a church makes me want to barf. :grimace:
  • "Overuse of the gaming product"
    which apparently is the euphemism for "gambling addiction".

    "Do you know Jesus?"
    which means the person wants to tell you about their personal Jesus.

    ?is there "overuse of the Jesus product"?
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