Cool Britannia (sort of): the British thread 2019

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  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Sadly it's not snow I need - these are globes portraying "under the sea" - and the obvious solution would be blue/green/silver glitter, but
    1. the mess is going to be horrible and a pain to clean up in a joint use hall,
    2. I really don't want to buy glitter if it's been listed as a problem ecologically

    That makes it even more ironic as it’s the sea creatures which suffer, ultimately, from our excess plastic.

    Maybe use it as a teaching point on saving the environment and get the guides to think of ecologically friendly alternatives?

  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    I’ve moved over to solid shampoo to save on plastic - it has really surprised me. You need very little to form a lather. I think one bar will last me all year1
  • The problem with this exercise is that it's the District Handicrafts Competition, so we are putting anything we do to be judged against others, and if we make it eco-friendly I suspect we're setting the girls up to fail. I'm not happy about a lot of the classes for similar reasons, but we let the girls vote* for the ones they wanted to do in sessions, and this was the most popular choice. The other choices, dream catchers and biscuit pyramids, are not such an issue.

    * we are supposed to allow them to make decisions
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    The problem with this exercise is that it's the District Handicrafts Competition, so we are putting anything we do to be judged against others, and if we make it eco-friendly I suspect we're setting the girls up to fail. I'm not happy about a lot of the classes for similar reasons, but we let the girls vote* for the ones they wanted to do in sessions, and this was the most popular choice. The other choices, dream catchers and biscuit pyramids, are not such an issue.

    * we are supposed to allow them to make decisions

    Then again, if they are really innovative, they may win!

  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I'm currently messing about on here while waiting for D. to come home from his staff meeting, after which we're going out for lunch at a nice but not too expensive pub not far from here. They do a very decent lunch-size steak, and one of their house reds is a lovely Argentinian Malbec.

    After that, a schlepp round Costco to replenish the porcine larder.
  • Way back when I was a Girl Scout, caring for the environment was a major focus. If this project could be done in an eco-friendly way, perhaps with a sign indicating what materials were used and why, I would think that would work in their favor in the competition.
  • I think it ought to, but I also know who is going to judge. It doesn't need to be done for a bit, so I can plan and discuss with the girls.
  • Yes ‘under the sea’ would fit in very nicely with the David Attenborough campaign to reduce plastics in the sea. Perhaps ordinary sand might be used to form the sea bed swirling around?
    I’ve just made some very nice curd cheese and garlicky courgette fritters for tea, served with crepe fraiche.
  • HeavenlyannieHeavenlyannie Shipmate
    edited January 15
    I can get hold of some wooden fish beads which I would happily donate. Or dolphins.
  • Thank you for that offer - the problem is enough of anything for 24! Which is why I'm thinking around the problem - ways of doing this cheaply and recycling, but producing individual competition entries that will stand a chance when judged against bought in kits. My first thought was fish made of cellophane from sweet wrappers, for example.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    How about painted pebbles?
  • I can happily buy you 2 lots of 50 beads as a donation. But recycling cellophane is a good idea. My first thought (I used to do mixed media art) was cutting small sardines from aluminium cans, it is soft enough to do with serrated snips and I used to sell die cut recycled can Christmas tree angels decorations. I might see if my husband has any cans at work and try it out.
  • Curiosity killedCuriosity killed Shipmate
    edited January 15
    That's another class of entry. Not one any of them voted for. Seriously 16 or 17 classes to enter, we're refusing to spend the next 4 months doing crafts as that doesn't make for a balanced programme, so offered to set up the most popular 3 challenges plus the group challenge. And it's specifically globes, like snow globes, but in the water.
  • HeavenlyannieHeavenlyannie Shipmate
    edited January 15
    I assume the girls have chosen globes? If not there are other options such as hanging strings of sardines made from felt and simple embroidered eyes, metal sequins etc
  • I quite like the idea of sardine bunting with embroidery! Might try it.
  • They have chosen globes. All of them voted for the damn things. At least they didn't vote for creating a coral reef or oasis water painting.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    How about paper straw globes with paper or foil fish?
  • Because the category on the competition instructions is for a "Water Globe, no bigger than a jam jar" and it's in the group "Under the Sea" with the coral reef and a collage (which I hoped they'd go for from that category).
  • Is it worth going back to the girls explaining the issue and asking them if they have any ideas for a solution or alternative? If they are anything like the young people I’ve come across they might be horrified at the implications and only too glad to change.
  • It's one of the options - or we can find ways around it. Sand instead of glitter is definitely something I think we'll pursue.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited January 16
    I'm going to display my complete absence of artistic savvy here - would it be possible to dye the sand in any way, or colour the water to give an under-sea effect? Possibly with the help of strategically-placed tin-foil to give a feeling of shine/sparkle?

    * * * * *

    In other news, the electronic pixies have landed with my pension, and we are (at least for the moment) unskint. <yipee>

    Shopping has happened. :blush:
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    I have zillions of tiny glass beads, harvested from (often charity shop) necklaces over the years.

    I’m thinking sheet of paper + adhesive + coating of beads + crumpling paper to give barnacley sea-bottom rock appearance?
  • How about fish scales? Surely they wouldn't deteriorate in water ... wouldn't they be plentiful and free at the fish market?
  • This is not urgent. The competition is not until the end of April. But if we have to collect masses of stuff we need to start now. I'm more pondering what we use to make the globes - as I'm not sure most of my better ideas are going work. I'd like to use jam jars as cheap and cheerful and water tight, but am not sure how safe that's going to be with 24 of them to handle and transport. Purchasing kits is not cheap. And I'll end up experimenting before I set this up to do with the girls.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    edited January 16
    Boogie wrote: »
    I’ve moved over to solid shampoo to save on plastic - it has really surprised me. You need very little to form a lather. I think one bar will last me all year1

    I also use a bar, sometimes a flat cake. Smells good, works well. I buy mine from a small firm in Tasmania and will pass onlink if sent a PM. Also no mess if travelling. Conditioner comes as a small flat cake in a tin.

    Firm occasionally has a sale on seconds. Quality is the same but the bar may have a chip or similar which does not affect quality. Price is very cheap then.

  • I used to use Sham Poo, but now I simply polish my solar panel....
    :cry:

    More acupuncture yesterday. It does help relieve the otherwise constant dull ache, but next week I'm having a Pilates trial session (the exercise thingy, not like the one in the Bible :flushed: ).

    My GP recommends physiotherapy, but the osteopath said Pilates might be worth a try! I shall hie me off to A Shop today, and buy some smart new joggers and T-shirts.
  • BF, Mr WitG is a long-time Pilates person and I have the distinct impression that Pilates classes are done in socks not joggers.
  • I think he means jogging bottoms not training shoes
  • Lily PadLily Pad Shipmate
    Curiosity killed, we have made the jam jar ones with various youth groups and they are very durable. We used the Mason jar brand of jars - recycling the actual jars and using new lids and sealers. You can buy the lids/sealers by the dozen for very little. We used the cardboard boxes that you buy the jars in for transporting them. Liquor store boxes with the dividers in them would work well too. If you wanted to carry it further, the girls could hem around a circle of fabric, put in a drawstring and make a little carrying bag for their globe. They might be nice for the display. I like the idea of using creative things for the insides that show you are thinking of the environmental aspect. A very popular thing here is to use stones to make an Inuksuk and then have foil confetti be the "snow".
  • HeavenlyannieHeavenlyannie Shipmate
    edited January 16
    How about bottle top fish? I mean silver foil, Nice and easy and free (I have my milk delivered in bottles if you need a source).
  • I have just worked out I have a number of plastic jars (cheap supermarket peanut butter) - that actually look a good size and shape. I reuse jars of all shapes and sizes and these are currently housing dressmaking supplies, but I have other tubs that I can reallocate, sadly not transparent. And I'm sure I can find some fun stuff to recycle into these globes - I already have blue and yellow round beads and star shaped beads bought to make Christmas decorations over the years, plus I was thinking recycling would be good (although I have a use for the blue beads for next year) and going through stashes various will find more things.

    @Lily Pad we don't really get those jars over here so much, I would have to buy them - and as with most of these options, the cost is around £2 a jar or more - which rapidly tots up to £50 plus when you're catering for 25. I do have jam jars, but these girls are aged 10-14, mostly to the lower end of that age range, with different of needs, so I would prefer to use recycled plastic if I can. £50 activities we tend to ask for donations, and I don't want to have to ask the parents for donations to make handicrafts if I can find a way around this.

    Thank you for all your suggestions, I was more throwing hissy fits where it wasn't going to matter, than asking for help, but the suggestions are great, thank you.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Hissy fits always welcome @Curiosity killed 😝

    @Bishops Finger , I go to Pilates every Friday morning - I really do feel better for it. I never really look forward to going, but come away feeling good.
  • I think he means jogging bottoms not training shoes

    Yes, that's what I meant, and that's what I'm now kitted out with, in very flattering and fetching black. I think the shop website referred to them as 'joggers'....

    @WormInTheGrass, does Mr. Worm find Pilates helpful? I'm not a particularly sporty/exercisey person, but willing to try any means of improving my fitness.

    ION, lunch today at a friend's house. He's a good cook, and had prepared a tasty light refection of gammon, roast potatoes, carrots (done in sugar and butter :yum: ), and Chinese cabbage. I don't think I've ever had Chinese cabbage, but also :yum:

    He'd also made a jar of green tomato chutney for me, which I shall enjoy later with some CHEESE, unlike the gentleman mentioned in Edward Lear's limerick:

    There was an old person of Putney,
    Whose food was roast Spiders and Chutney,
    Which he took with his Tea, within sight of the Sea,
    That romantic old person of Putney.



  • Boogie wrote: »

    @Bishops Finger , I go to Pilates every Friday morning - I really do feel better for it. I never really look forward to going, but come away feeling good.

    Thanks for that, Boogie. I'm actually quite looking forward to it, in a funny sort of way, as being yet another Learning Experience (and I've had a fair few of those in the past three years!).

  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    @Bishops Finger I do Pilates once a week too (twice when my writing class isn't on). My regular class is tough for me and I can't do all of it even though I think for someone with more flexibility and strength than me it is probably fairly easy. The irregular class I really like and involves using bands for resistance. So if the class you go to isn't your cup of tea look round for others.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    All this talk of Pilates and exercisey things is making me feel (a) guilty; and (b) sleepy. :tired_face:

    We seem to be getting a touch more sn*w - maybe I could send it through the ether to Curiosity for her sn*w globes ... :smiley:

    I'm delighted to report that my share of my dad's estate (apart from the house, which isn't part of it, as it already belongs to my siblings and me, and is yet to be sold) should be here by the end of next week, which should further banninate the Finance Monster and give us a bit of a safety net.

    After the really lean year we've had, it's nice to think that for a while there won't be any month left at the end of the money. While I'm not planning on going mad with the bank card, I've treated myself to a new pair of boots to replace the ones that are on their third winter*, and whose non-slip qualities have all but disappeared.

    * Considering that winter here lasts for at least 4 months, that's not bad going.
  • Oh my knees, my poor creaky knees. Yesterday I did around 7 hours of Uni exam invigilating in large halls with large numbers of students which mean much patrolling. And then back again this afternoon or more patrolling. It was worth it - I caught 2 cheats and several disallowed calculators, and kept many students supplied with paper. But oh my knees....
  • Out of interest, what did you do re the 2 cheats? Cast them into Outer Darkness?
    :grimace:
  • Boogie wrote: »

    @Bishops Finger , I go to Pilates every Friday morning - I really do feel better for it. I never really look forward to going, but come away feeling good.

    Thanks for that, Boogie. I'm actually quite looking forward to it, in a funny sort of way, as being yet another Learning Experience (and I've had a fair few of those in the past three years!).

    I go every week, too - with a low-slung car, steep stairs, and no wall cupboards in the kitchen, I need to stay as flexible as possible! Do take care, @Bishops Finger , that you go to a class with an instructor who will correct you if you're doing it wrong. Like any exercise, you can damage yourself if you do it wrong.

    But it's also very good for your balance - I took it up after my third broken wrist...

    Mrs. S, who has stuck to Pilates longer than anything else!
  • Thanks for the encouragement, all! I note (and heed) the warnings.

    I think the first 'taster' session is on a one-to-one basis, so the instructor will soon see if I'm capable and/or competent...
    :fearful:
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    ... after my third broken wrist...
    Most of us only have two ... :mrgreen:

    I'll see myself out.

    Having done a spot more shopping, I'm now enjoying the comfortable feeling of having a well-stocked fridge, freezer and larder, and of most of our usual favourite dishes being doable.
  • Piglet wrote: »
    ... after my third broken wrist...
    Most of us only have two ... :mrgreen:

    I know someone who had three hips replaced.
    :wink:

  • BF, Mr WitG swears that it has improved his flexibility, posture and balance. He goes to equipment classes, not mat ones. Good luck!
  • Pigwidgeon wrote: »

    I know someone who had three hips replaced.
    :wink:
    My mother had six! (She had congenital hip displacement and congenital osteoarthritis. One of her femurs then spontaneously broke in retaliation).
  • I agree with the others about Pilates, really good core strengthening and great if you need exercise whilst protecting your joints. I inherited my mothers early onset osteoarthritis so can only do low impact exercise (I prefer Iyengar yoga myself, been doing it for 5 or 6 years, as it does more mental preparation as well as strengthening).
    This morning’s yoga class has been cancelled as the venue has fire alarm problems so I’m going to take myself on a long walk before doing some marking.
  • It's a glorious day here in Dragon Land, we've been swimming (my wife had a new Aquafit instructor today, who she did not take to, I just do some lengths). The washing is nearly ready to hang out, and we intend going to see "Stan and Ollie" later this afternoon (if we actually get there it will be remarkable, for we have a long history of Intending To See Films But Not Getting Round To It).
  • MMMMMM Shipmate
    We had snow across the MMM homelands earlier on but it’s all blue and sunny now.

    MMM
  • A bright sunny morning in south-east Wales, coldest day so far.
  • Snow flurries here too, followed by bright sunshine. As it's been so wet and miserable, I haven't got out for a walk the last two days so the plan is for a walk this afternoon.

    Today's adventures in catering have included some experimental gluten-free biscuits. The local Tesco's sold out of all gluten free flour before Christmas. The label on the shelf has been promising deliveries on various dates, the last being yesterday, but a quick trawl to check for stock this morning only found bread and self-raising flour. Plan B was to make gluten free flour from the selection at home: potato, soy, buckwheat and almond, but every recipe requires tapioca flour, which I can't find anywhere locally - I'd rather support local shops than Amazon, but may have to resort to selling my soul online. (I also need rice flour, brown and white, but those I can find here.) So today's biscuits are following a recipe using buckwheat flour, with a few variations. Currently sitting on top of the oven cooling before sampling. You're all welcome to virtual GF chocolate chip cookies (made with cocoa nibs), which may not taste like any biscuits anyone has eaten before.
  • <snip> You're all welcome to virtual GF chocolate chip cookies (made with cocoa nibs), which may not taste like any biscuits anyone has eaten before.

    Years ago in Cyprus one could get ersatz chocolate made with carobs. It was OK, but it wasn't chocolate and you couldn't pretend it was.
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