How did Jesus view the Bible?

Whilst reading through Matthew's gospel, Jesus words on divorce struck me, not in relation to divorce but in relation to His view of how Scripture should be approached.I'm not sure why it never hit me before but Matt.19:8 appears to show Jesus saying that the words of Moses in the OT are not inerrant, rather they are conforming to the culture of the time but this is not God's will.

Not wanting to discuss 'Biblical' views on divorce, rather what these verses say about approaches to the authority of the Bible, specifically what evidence we have of Jesus' views on such.

Thoughts?

Comments

  • Um. I'm pretty certain Jesus didn't view the Bible at all. I'm pretty certain He was reading the Torah.

    AFF
  • EvangelineEvangeline Shipmate
    Thanks, I'm so enlightened now, I always thought Jesus whipped out the new King James when at the Synagogue or debating the Pharisees, who were endlessly pedantic, missing the wood for the trees.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited April 12
    Um. I'm pretty certain Jesus didn't view the Bible at all. I'm pretty certain He was reading the Torah.
    Well, the Torah and the Prophets and Writings. But yeah.

    As for his approach, I’m not sure it’s quite right to say he didn’t think the OT was “inerrant.” That seems a little like imposing a modern idea. But I don’t think it’s totally off track either.

  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    If we break down and say "What we refer to as the Old Testament" can we dispense with the pedantics?
  • RublevRublev Shipmate
    On the one hand Jesus was inerrant because He said that the scriptures cannot be broken and that not a jot or tittle of the Law would be taken away until it was all fulfilled (John 10: 35; Matt 5:18).

    On the other hand Jesus was liberal because He reprioritised the OT Law in SOM and said that He was the fulfilment of the scriptures (Matt 5-7; Luke 24: 25-27).

    And above it all He is the Word of God so He is the Personified Hermeneutic (Gen 1: 1; John 1: 1-9). So He taught with authority, not like one of the scribes. And He challenged the Pharisees imposition of their own religious rules upon others.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    I’m going to skirt round the dead horse question of inerrancy to say I think that Jesus saw Moses’ permission as being to allow for hard cases. It wasn’t, as some were advocating in his day, a permission for a man to divorce his wife for any reason he liked. He goes on to affirm the basic intention behind marriage as a full and lifelong commitment, and specifically to criticise as adultery the process of a man divorcing his wife in order to marry someone he found more attractive.

    Mostly I find David Instone Brewer’s reading of this to be convincing.
  • Rublev wrote: »
    And above it all He is the Word of God so He is the Personified Hermeneutic

    I am so stealing that.

    I think what Jesus does is legitimise the practice, dating back to the Pentateuch, of constant reinterpretation of Scripture, in particular to provide derogations or accommodations.

    This is epitomised by his saying that the Sabbath was made for man, and not the other way around.
  • The effect of Christ is to reveal the scriptures as being there to be lived, not to be observed.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    I don't think pointing out the difference between the Bible and Jewish scripture is pedantic.
  • Martin54Martin54 Shipmate
    He saw Himself and His atoning mission there for sure. In ways that can't work now.
  • tclunetclune Shipmate
    LeRoc wrote: »
    I don't think pointing out the difference between the Bible and Jewish scripture is pedantic.

    Quite right. It's just plain wrong. When Robert Alter writes this, e.g., he is not showing his ignorance.
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    edited April 12
    It was quite common for rabbis to reinterpret portions of scriptures to fit the zeitgeist of the time. But do remember, we are looking at these sayings through second hand sources. Undoubtedly the writer of Matthew twisted what he heard to fit his overall theme. In Matthew Jesus comes out strongly against hypocrisy.
    Well, the Torah and the Prophets and Writings. But yeah.

    I am fairly certain he also know the Talmud, the Mishnah and the Midrash as well.
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