Proof Americans and Brits speak a different language

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  • edited August 16
    Sugar.
    Some of us don't need it. We're sweet enough without it.

    Noting that the corn sugar lobby in the USA is reported as pretty powerful.
    mousethief wrote: »
    Tea condom sounds like something you put tea in so that it can't possibly impregnate the water.

    I suspect this may be true. I want my tea to impregnate my tastebuds.
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    And sweet tea in the southeast doesn't just have sweetener in it. You actually create what is essentially a simple syrup by boiling sugar and water, then steeping tea in it. It's vile.
    If by vile you mean elixir of the gods, then I agree.

    You're 0–2 today.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    And sweet tea in the southeast doesn't just have sweetener in it. You actually create what is essentially a simple syrup by boiling sugar and water, then steeping tea in it. It's vile.
    If by vile you mean elixir of the gods, then I agree.

    You're 0–2 today.
    Confident as I am that I side with the angels, I can live with that. There’s always tomorrow. :wink:

  • :lol:
    Exactly what was thinking.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned "corn" -- in Blighty it still means "grain" whereas in the States, we figured one word for "grain" was probably enough, and subverted it to mean one particular grain, maize.

    As they do here.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    Sweet Tea! My mind and stomach rebel at the thought.
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    :lol:
    Exactly what was thinking.

    All is forgiven.
  • Maize, in Britain, is sweetcorn or "corn on the cob".
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    Although in my childhood corn, in some parts of Scotland, still meant oats, and maybe still does. Bread meant oatcakes, and leavened, wheaten bread was distinguished as loaf.
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    edited August 16
    mousethief wrote: »
    Tea condom sounds like something you put tea in so that it can't possibly impregnate the water.

    Quote file! :grin:

    ETA: Already there
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned "corn" -- in Blighty it still means "grain" whereas in the States, we figured one word for "grain" was probably enough, and subverted it to mean one particular grain, maize.
    The reason is fairly simple. Until the development of new versions about 50 years ago, maize didn't grow here. I first saw it in Southern Europe in 1966 and as it looked so exotic, assumed it must be tobacco. It still doesn't ripen reliably. When grown, is grown mainly for animal feed, made by processing the entire plant. Maize flour isn't an ingredient in our traditional diet. Apart from corn on the cob and Corn Flakes, which I think is made from maize, I can't off-hand think of anything it goes into.
  • Many years ago I read that countries use "corn" for their principal cereal. So in UK it's wheat, and USA maize.

    Ross, you mentioned another way to use "brilliant". Could you expand please?
  • Enoch--

    No pop(ped) corn there, to munch at movies? Though that may be a different species.
  • People don't think where it comes from.
  • Forthview wrote: »
    I like the Glasgow expression 'ginger' which doesn't refer to the colour of one's hair,but is rather a general word for all sorts of aerated waters, in particular, perhaps the 'ginger; colour of Scotland's 'other national drink' Irn Bru - apparently made in Scotland of steel girders - at least that is what they say in the adverts

    and you'll also hear Scots refer to a "Can of Juice", where Juice is a catch-all term for a soft drink, like "a Soda" in the US is not just Soda Water.

    Oh, and Irn-Bru does have iron in it - a very small amount of Ammonium Ferric Sulphate.

  • Wet Kipper wrote: »
    Forthview wrote: »
    I like the Glasgow expression 'ginger' which doesn't refer to the colour of one's hair,but is rather a general word for all sorts of aerated waters, in particular, perhaps the 'ginger; colour of Scotland's 'other national drink' Irn Bru - apparently made in Scotland of steel girders - at least that is what they say in the adverts

    and you'll also hear Scots refer to a "Can of Juice", where Juice is a catch-all term for a soft drink, like "a Soda" in the US is not just Soda Water.

    Oh, and Irn-Bru does have iron in it - a very small amount of Ammonium Ferric Sulphate.

    Diversion... I wonder what happened to the Irn Bru advertising slogan, "Made from girders"? Did the advertising standards people put the kybosh to that?
  • sionisaissionisais Shipmate
    To return to hot beverages, when my dad was based at a joint RAF/USAF station in Lincolshire, mum was invited to an American wife's home. She asked my mum if she would like tea or coffee so mum, thinking that Americans are always on about how the English can't make coffee chose that.

    She wasn't impressed when her host put a large teaspoon of Maxwell House in a mug, then ran the hot tap for maybe 15 seconds and then used hot water straight from the tap to make coffee, after which milk was added. For years she thought this was typical, but she gradually learned that most Amricans can make decent coffee (and we still have one of those marvellous percolators that is placed on a gas hob).
  • Golden Key wrote: »
    Enoch--

    No pop(ped) corn there, to munch at movies? Though that may be a different species.

    Different cultivar. Same grain.
  • john holdingjohn holding Ecclesiantics Host, Mystery Worshipper Host
    Enoch wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned "corn" -- in Blighty it still means "grain" whereas in the States, we figured one word for "grain" was probably enough, and subverted it to mean one particular grain, maize.
    The reason is fairly simple. Until the development of new versions about 50 years ago, maize didn't grow here. I first saw it in Southern Europe in 1966 and as it looked so exotic, assumed it must be tobacco. It still doesn't ripen reliably. When grown, is grown mainly for animal feed, made by processing the entire plant. Maize flour isn't an ingredient in our traditional diet. Apart from corn on the cob and Corn Flakes, which I think is made from maize, I can't off-hand think of anything it goes into.

    No cornflour? Used for making milk puddings and the cold "shapes" beloved of victorian kitchens for cold SUnday meals and nursery fare, and for thickening sauces where wheat flour was inappropriate because it needed added fat to work? On this side of the Atlantic we call it corn starch, but I'm sure cornflour was around in the UK when I lived there.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned "corn" -- in Blighty it still means "grain" whereas in the States, we figured one word for "grain" was probably enough, and subverted it to mean one particular grain, maize.

    Actually, owing one assumes to American influence, it's a long time since I heard "corn" used to describe wheat in regular discourse. We would still tend to say "sweetcorn" for maize, but "corn" on its own would no longer be the regularly selected lexical term for wheat.

    Having said that, Mrs Karlt and the eldest Karltlet (15) agree that on its own, "corn" would be assumed to be wheat. It's just not the word we'd usually use.
  • You know that the vegetable is called "beets" right? Redundant to called them beetroot, which sound when said to be bee-troot. The tops are called beet greens, but we grow swiss chard which is the plant but varieties selected for the tops.

    A turnip is a turnip. No idea how they became Swedish for some. There's another word floating around - "rutabaga", which used in a sentence might be "It is rutabaga fart and then hold the bag in someone's face."

    And yams are a tropical thing, they are not sweet potatoes.
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    edited August 16
    A
    Enoch wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned "corn" -- in Blighty it still means "grain" whereas in the States, we figured one word for "grain" was probably enough, and subverted it to mean one particular grain, maize.
    The reason is fairly simple. Until the development of new versions about 50 years ago, maize didn't grow here. I first saw it in Southern Europe in 1966 and as it looked so exotic, assumed it must be tobacco. It still doesn't ripen reliably. When grown, is grown mainly for animal feed, made by processing the entire plant. Maize flour isn't an ingredient in our traditional diet. Apart from corn on the cob and Corn Flakes, which I think is made from maize, I can't off-hand think of anything it goes into.

    No cornflour? Used for making milk puddings and the cold "shapes" beloved of victorian kitchens for cold SUnday meals and nursery fare, and for thickening sauces where wheat flour was inappropriate because it needed added fat to work? On this side of the Atlantic we call it corn starch, but I'm sure cornflour was around in the UK when I lived there.

    Yes, I use cornflour for thickening gravy and sauces as it doesn’t form lumps. Also, mixed to a thick paste with cold water, it makes a lovely ‘gloop’ for young children to play with! Forgot to say, I’m in the UK.
  • It's called "corn starch" where I come from. "Corn meal" is a gritty, coarse ground corn flour.

    I've also heard that "icing sugar" is called "powdered sugar" in some places.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited August 16
    I've also heard that "icing sugar" is called "powdered sugar" in some places.
    ”Powdered sugar” or “confectioner’s sugar” is what it’s called here (American South).


  • MiffyMiffy Shipmate
    As it said on my Granny’s teacosy:

    Unless the water boiling be, filling the teapot spoils the tea!
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    Turnips and swedes are very different from each other, though ‘neeps’ are swedes not turnips. Rutabaga is swede.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    BroJames wrote: »
    ... Rutabaga is swede.
    So that's what a rutabaga is. I've occasionally wondered. Where's the word actually used?

    @NOprophet_NØprofit is what you describe as 'corn meal' the North American equivalent of what's described here. I've heard Africans resident here grumble that they've been unable to find anything readily obtainable from which they can make a genuine version of this dish.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    Y
    Enoch wrote: »
    BroJames wrote: »
    ... Rutabaga is swede.
    So that's what a rutabaga is. I've occasionally wondered. Where's the word actually used?
    Branston Pickle ingredients.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Enoch wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned "corn" -- in Blighty it still means "grain" whereas in the States, we figured one word for "grain" was probably enough, and subverted it to mean one particular grain, maize.
    The reason is fairly simple. Until the development of new versions about 50 years ago, maize didn't grow here. I first saw it in Southern Europe in 1966 and as it looked so exotic, assumed it must be tobacco. It still doesn't ripen reliably. When grown, is grown mainly for animal feed, made by processing the entire plant. Maize flour isn't an ingredient in our traditional diet. Apart from corn on the cob and Corn Flakes, which I think is made from maize, I can't off-hand think of anything it goes into.

    No cornflour? Used for making milk puddings and the cold "shapes" beloved of victorian kitchens for cold SUnday meals and nursery fare, and for thickening sauces where wheat flour was inappropriate because it needed added fat to work? On this side of the Atlantic we call it corn starch, but I'm sure cornflour was around in the UK when I lived there.

    But that's the trick - cornflour is not made from maize. "Corn" is used in the older sense of "grain". To get flour made from corn, at last here, you need to buy maize flour and that's readily available in supermarkets.
  • AthrawesAthrawes Shipmate
    Yes, I was allergic to corn as in maize, but had no problem with cornflour as a thickening agent. I’m not sure what the grain was that it was ground from, but it isn’t corn.
  • We consider the things you call rutabagas and swedes as varieties of turnip. There's the yellow flesh turnips and the purple top turnips.

    Neeps means the unfortunate dish where turnips are mashed, spiced and sweetened. People do similar things to sweet potatoes.
  • When we first came to Canada, we spent ages in supermarkets looking for castor sugar (Mrs Teasdale uses it a lot in her baking). We couldn't find it anywhere and it took us a while to realise that we needed to buy berry sugar.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    Cornflour: Wikipedia nails a US/UK difference if which I was unaware.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    I'm not sure about Wikipedia. At least here the fine print on the side of the packet of cornflour says it's made from wheat, and I remember some consternation from Pomona on another thread many years ago about his discovery that that was also the position in the UK. He had not been aware of the old meaning of "corn".
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Checking out pix, I think what I would have called 'corn' when meeting it on a grandparent's farm as a child was properly oats. The seeds are in a loose cluster unlike the ears of wheat or barley.

    I am not sure what specific cereal Keats had in mind when he wrote Ruth in tears amid the alien corn - but given usage at time was for all grains (cf the Corn Laws) he didn't need to.

  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Gee D wrote: »
    I'm not sure about Wikipedia. At least here the fine print on the side of the packet of cornflour says it's made from wheat, and I remember some consternation from Pomona on another thread many years ago about his discovery that that was also the position in the UK. He had not been aware of the old meaning of "corn".

    Cornflour in the UK is made from maize, at least according to the Google results I can get.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Right, I can only speak from what Pomona reported then. Does anyone have a packet handy?
  • In my cupboard, the cheap supermarket brand says nothing useful; the label reads 'Cornflour' but it says nothing about the grain or any allergens. Looking at a shopping website, the posh brand says it is milled from corn starch and is gluten free. Perhaps this post belongs on the Eating well thread.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Right, I can only speak from what Pomona reported then. Does anyone have a packet handy?

    The packet of cornflour in my cupboard lists the contents as "Maize flour".
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    I
    Firenze wrote: »
    Checking out pix, I think what I would have called 'corn' when meeting it on a grandparent's farm as a child was properly oats. The seeds are in a loose cluster unlike the ears of wheat or barley.

    Yes, that’s what my cousins in Banffshire would have called corn.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Thanks
  • Landlubber wrote: »
    In my cupboard, the cheap supermarket brand says nothing useful; the label reads 'Cornflour' but it says nothing about the grain or any allergens. Looking at a shopping website, the posh brand says it is milled from corn starch and is gluten free. Perhaps this post belongs on the Eating well thread.

    Same! But I’m sure I’ve seen it as wheat flour.
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    Yes, I’ve just checked mine and it just says cornflour, no other details.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    I'm fairly sure that historically, 'corn' = any grain, and usually the one that is most widely grown where the speaker happens to be. So in England that would be (and is) wheat. In the north of Scotland that would be oats. "Fair waved the golden corn in Canaan's pleasant land" also meant wheat both to J.H. Gurney who wrote the hymn and would have done to the inhabitants of ancient Canaan if they'd spoken English.

    One of the changes in my lifetime has been that selective breeding means that wheat stalks are shorter and less flexible than they were 60 years ago. This makes them easier to harvest mechanically and more resistant to being flattened by wind and rain - both features of a typical English summer then and now. So the golden corn waved far more in those days.
  • I checked a few on Ocado and all just said they contained cornflour. However, under allergen type info none mentioned wheat or gluten & one said it didn’t contain gluten. So maybe it isn’t wheat.
  • Have you corn snow? It's when it's melted a bit and snow forms corn kernel sized bits.

    There's also corn syrup which is from the yellow thing going on cobbs.

    I'm not understanding berry sugar or caster sugar. I presume one of these is icing sugar. Being that granulated sugar is sucrose and icing sugar is the same ground up to powder.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    Enoch wrote: »
    One of the changes in my lifetime has been that selective breeding means that wheat stalks are shorter and less flexible than they were 60 years ago. This makes them easier to harvest mechanically and more resistant to being flattened by wind and rain - both features of a typical English summer then and now. So the golden corn waved far more in those days.

    I noticed that on my trip to Oregon this summer. The fields of what was recognizably wheat were only about knee high. When I was a youngster, long, long ago, we would run in the wheat fields (helping ourselves to a snack now and then) and the stalks were at least shoulder high. The heads (as much as I could see from the car) looked to be about the same size.

    I can imagine the harvesting of shorted stalks would be easier with less wheat straw to rehome. But think of the children!!! Hiding in the wheat fields was so much fun! We just had to be aware of the harvesting machines!!!
  • CathscatsCathscats Shipmate
    Have you corn snow? It's when it's melted a bit and snow forms corn kernel sized bits.

    There's also corn syrup which is from the yellow thing going on cobbs.

    I'm not understanding berry sugar or caster sugar. I presume one of these is icing sugar. Being that granulated sugar is sucrose and icing sugar is the same ground up to powder.

    Not so. Caster sugar is a finer sugar than granulated, but not as fine as icing or powder sugar. In 7 years in the States I never came across it, and no one I knew used berry sugar, if it existed, they just baked with granulated. Caster does give a smoother cake/scone/bus unit (cookie) batter.
  • jedijudy wrote: »
    I noticed that on my trip to Oregon this summer. The fields of what was recognizably wheat were only about knee high. When I was a youngster, long, long ago, we would run in the wheat fields (helping ourselves to a snack now and then) and the stalks were at least shoulder high. The heads (as much as I could see from the car) looked to be about the same size.

    Whereas, "The corn is as high as an elephant's eye, An' it looks like its climbin' clear up to the sky."
    :wink:
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