An Announcement: New Bishop for Diocese of Vermont

The Episcopal Diocese of Vermont (part of TEC) will ordain and consecrate the Rev. Dr. Shannon McVean-Brown this coming Saturday, Sept. 28. Chief Consecrator will be Archbishop Michael Curry, Presiding Bishop of ECUSA (also known as the lengthy preacher at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.) Bishop Shannon will be the first African American Diocesan Bishop in TEC’s Province One (New England area).

The service will take place in the chapel of the University of Vermont, which offers more seating than the Cathedral. The service begins at 11 am Eastern Daylight Time (16:00 hours BST.) The service will be available on YouTube: a link will be available on the diocesan website as of service time: https://diovermont.org/bishop-transition/

Bishop Shannon will be formally seated in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul on Sunday, Sept. 29. At 10 am Eastern Daylight Time (15:00 hours BST. ) That service will also be available on YouTube by link from the Diocesan website. https://diovermont.org/bishop-transition/

Do give thanks and celebrate with us!

Comments

  • Exciting news! Thanks for the information!
  • Sounds good. What's it like in the Diocese of Vermont?
  • What's it like? Well, depends what you want to know! Weather today has been a touch of summer and cloudiness and cool of autumn. Church life? -- good and solid liberal Episcopalians, leaning pretty much towards high church (tomorrow's service will have candles and torch bearers, and incense, ditto on Sunday). Economics? Too many towns that were once great, but now the industry gone elsewhere, so lots of once-were-great towns now rather shabby, empty store fronts, large parish churches now dusty with few attending. But then there are the towns with thriving universities, usually court towns with attorneys, and parishes there thriving. The bishop is very accessible, knows clergy by name, can reach him easily or his Canon to the Ordinary. Retiring bishop sent a very heartfelt thank you by e-mail to his clergy this morning. He has been a champion of LGBTQ inclusion in the church, supported Gene Robinson when he was elected bishop of next-door New Hampshire, was lead bishop in getting the marriage service in our BCP changed to be inclusive.....

    Husband and I moved here 18 years ago from New York City, worked in healthcare admin (me) and university admin (hubby), we love the artsy, slightly out of date funky vibe, the friendly people, the energy for positive change in the world, the clean air, mountains, hills, lakes and rivers, and that just about everybody gets along.......

    Or did I miss your question by a mile? Ask more anytime!
  • Fawkes CatFawkes Cat Shipmate
    edited September 26
    I know it's unhelpful and flippant to ask, but does anyone have a picture (in frame) of Dr McVean-Brown?
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Fawkes Cat wrote: »
    I know it's unhelpful and flippant to ask, but does anyone have a picture (in frame) of Dr McVean-Brown?

    Because you have a second-hand portable font?

  • Firenze wrote: »
    Fawkes Cat wrote: »
    I know it's unhelpful and flippant to ask, but does anyone have a picture (in frame) of Dr McVean-Brown?

    Because you have a second-hand portable font?

    For the avoidance of doubt, I am not an evangelical vicar.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    Wonderful!
  • Quoting myself:
    Husband and I moved here 18 years ago from New York City.
    .... well, not quite. Time does fly by quickly in Vermont (except in winter): we left NYC 36 years ago. Spent 18 years in the high hills where church, work, shops were 25 miles away. We then moved into a beautiful town in a river valley where we can walk to everything necessary.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    According to a photo uploaded to the Society Against Tacky Vestments page on Facebook, she has unfortunate taste in vestments. As one poster put it, "Pastel is not a liturgical color."
  • So true, pastel blue and silver is not liturgical..... but against her skin color, it is the color of heaven. I received communion from her hand yesterday: the vibrancy in her eye contact, her urgency in saying "The Body of Christ, the bread of heaven" was piercing, energetic and full of faith. My "Amen" all the more faithful in response to her. If we believe she is sent as part of God's love, and so then we too can live into that love more deeply, which may indeed bring us to places of deeper faith and a lesser criticism of vestments.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    I hope that she is the right person for the Diocese of Vermont!
  • But pastels are surely the colours of Ben and Jerry's ice cream, a great Vermont institution. Most sensitive of her to her new environment.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    "Tacky" is part of the name of the Facebook page where it was posted.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited September 29
    I know, but would something get posted there and commented on if not considered tacky?
    But pastels are surely the colours of Ben and Jerry's ice cream, a great Vermont institution. Most sensitive of her to her new environment.
    :lol:

  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    And is this the point at which to point out that, unlike the Catholic Church, the Episcopal Church has, as best I recall, no rules regarding liturgical colors, nor official list of liturgical colors at all?


    Yes, the Episcopal Church has no defined set of colors that I know of, although most liturgical calendars will indicate a color for the day or event: followed by those leaning High Church, which is Vermont, and set aside by others as they wish. I recall attending a priestly ordination some 40 years ago -- the new priest was vested in a stunningly beautiful lemon yellow chasuble. I thought then "how beautiful, but clearly not correct." My tastes have changed over the years, as has my strict adherence to tradition.

    Diocesan clergy were asked to vest with "festal stole" -- and my, what variety we had! Some in my estimation were more penitential, others just at the border of tacky, others at more of the 'billboard' style with large icons running down. One did remind me of those vibrantly colored 'sticky notes' which was rather fun.
  • BabyWombat wrote: »
    Yes, the Episcopal Church has no defined set of colors that I know of, although most liturgical calendars will indicate a color for the day or event: followed by those leaning High Church, which is Vermont, and set aside by others as they wish. I recall attending a priestly ordination some 40 years ago -- the new priest was vested in a stunningly beautiful lemon yellow chasuble. I thought then "how beautiful, but clearly not correct." My tastes have changed over the years, as has my strict adherence to tradition.

    Diocesan clergy were asked to vest with "festal stole" -- and my, what variety we had! Some in my estimation were more penitential, others just at the border of tacky, others at more of the 'billboard' style with large icons running down. One did remind me of those vibrantly colored 'sticky notes' which was rather fun.
    Interesting. We too have no official, defined set of colors. We do have suggestions, which pretty much follow the general usage of white (and gold), purple, red and green. (Blue in Advent seems to not to have caught on among us as it has with the Episcopalians, Lutherans and United Methodists, and our usage doesn't generally distinguish between red/crimson and scarlet.) But while the colors one sees generally align with what is seen in other Western traditions, there is always an understanding of freedom to do things differently, including use of "non-standard" colors.

    That said, red has become associated with ordinations in our suggested usage, and clergy who are members of the presbytery commission at ordinations of ministers will, in my experience, almost always be asked to wear red stoles.

    But the real question is what did your festal stole look like? :wink:

  • My festal stole is one woven by the group MaryWeave, a ministry of the Discalced Carmelite nuns curently based in Lowell, Vermont. However, mine is an earlier work of theirs, when based in the state of Maine.

    It is 100% wool in a soft off white about 5 inches wide and double thickness with soft horizontal rainbow stripes every 12 -16 inches. The back is a mitered seam so the stripes fill on the 'collar' area. When I bought it some 12 years ago (at the gift shop at the Benedictine Weston (Vt) Priory) it had rather thick woolen tassels at the ends, and another at the bottom of the seam at the neck which I removed since they made it bounce too much when walking.

    My alternate was a very vibrant mix of yellows and purples from Guatamala that my husband found as a gift for me while he was browsing Boston shops while I participated in a chant workshop at the former Episcopal Divinity School. I thought it a bit much for a solemn occasion and tend to save it for the first Sunday after Easter, blessing of animals day, and small group celebrations.

    Our retiring bishop usually wears red for ordinations. The PB seems to favor white for bishop events (basing this on the recent new bishop in Maine (who was a clergy colleague in Vt) and then again last Saturday's event.)

    Had you been present as visiting clergy last Saturday what would you have worn?
  • Episcopalian here; we don’t have set colors? If you buy the liturgical calendar from Church Publishing they have the days with the colors listed on it. Also, since I’m at an AC place, we’ve been pushing for black vestments for funerals and keep being told that official Episcopal policy is white for funerals (a terrible innovation.)
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited September 30
    ECraigR wrote: »
    Episcopalian here; we don’t have set colors? If you buy the liturgical calendar from Church Publishing they have the days with the colors listed on it. Also, since I’m at an AC place, we’ve been pushing for black vestments for funerals and keep being told that official Episcopal policy is white for funerals (a terrible innovation.)
    Since I raised the question, I’ll give my non-Episcopalian’s understanding, happy to be corrected if I get anything wrong:

    Neither the (1979) BCP nor, as I understand it, any other authorized liturgical documents in TEC specify what color is to be used on any given day or occasion. Custom (as reflected in practice and in various customaries) dictates the appropriate color, which can lead to some differences here and there. For example, I’ve heard discussions on what colors are appropriate for Palm Sunday and the days of Holy Week.

    Funerals may be an indirect exception to this. The note to the burial liturgy (p 507 of the BCP) says:
    The liturgy for the dead is an Easter liturgy. It finds all its meaning in the resurrection. Because Jesus was raised from the dead, we, too, shall be raised.

    The liturgy, therefore, is characterized by joy, in the certainty that “neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

    This joy, however, does not make human grief unchristian. The very love we have for each other in Christ brings deep sorrow when we are parted by death. Jesus himself wept at the grave of his friend. So, while we rejoice that one we love has entered into the nearer presence of our Lord, we sorrow in sympathy with those who mourn.
    There is an implication, then, that the color used on Easter should also be used at funerals to underscore the Easter connection. But it is not directly stated, nor is the proper color for Easter ever stated.

    BabyWombat wrote: »
    Had you been present as visiting clergy last Saturday what would you have worn?
    An interesting question that I’ll need to ponder, given that I’m not clergy (visiting or otherwise) and therefore have no stoles. But it might be fun to imagine. :smile:

  • Thanks, Nick. The bit about custom sounds very Episcopalian. I guess I just incorrectly assumed that it was set because I’ve never attended a church with non-traditional colors being used.
  • LothlorienLothlorien All Saints Host
    Discussion of colours has been split from this thread and is now in its own thread, Liturgical Colours in Ecclesiantics.
  • Well, best wishes to +Shannon, and her Diocese!

    I only hope, and pray, that we in Benighted Ukland can acquire some young*, female, Bishops of colour soon...
    :wink:

    *compared to me, that is... :grimace:
Sign In or Register to comment.