Fuck this fucking virus with a fucking farm implement.

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Comments

  • KarlLB wrote: »
    temporary

    My chief anxiety is that it won’t be temporary. There’s no exit strategy. It’s just going to be a constant series of three-week reviews that will all conclude we need to keep doing this. This is life now, and will be for long enough that you might as well call it forever. There are friends I will never see again, not because of Coronavirus but because they will die naturally before we’re allowed to meet up again.
  • If we follow your "get the economy going again" advice, the economy will still be shit and also a whole lot more people will be dead. Please just stay home.
    Though, given that a sizable proportion of our nation don't consider "getting the economy going again" to be a priority even without Covid-19 I'm not sure that's much of an argument anyway. If people wanted to get the economy going again they wouldn't have voted for a Conservative candidate in 2010, 2015, 2017 or 2019, and they wouldn't have voted for the UK to leave the EU either. Lots of people put other things ahead of getting the economy going all the time, why not put the health (and lives) of 100s of thousands of their fellow citizens (including their own) ahead of that now?
  • I respect your concern, I fear I might never see my parents again, they are both vulnerable and hundreds of miles away.

    I am trying to main contact via video. After all most of a relationship is about communication and activities together. E.g. My Dad’s bridge club has gone phut so I am going to see if we can play piquet together online at the time he used to go.
  • EutychusEutychus Shipmate
    edited March 2020
    My chief anxiety is that it won’t be temporary. There’s no exit strategy.

    A statement that would not have been out of place on the Brexit thread.

    And as I said repeatedly on the Brexit threads about the transition period, even if it doesn't provide a solution or an exit strategy, it at least buys time. So does confinement. Time to work on treatments and vaccinations, time to adjust industrial production priorities, time to flatten the curve for hospitals. I wholeheartedly agree that it's not a solution in and of itself and it's not optimally implemented (that would involve quarantining the ENTIRE PLANET for two to three weeks, all at once), but I think it's a start.
  • CameronCameron Shipmate
    edited March 2020
    There’s no reassurance. No rational cause for hope. It’s just me, my family and these four walls forever, or a painful choking death (remember that I’m in an at-risk group, so if I get this thing I may well die of it). Is it any wonder I’m about ready to burst?

    [emphasis added]

    It’s not forever, and not always going to be so restricted. There will be periods of easing and containment, most likely over 18 months. That’s how long it will take for a vaccine if all the normal protocols are followed - and they won’t be. These are desperate times and volunteers are probably going to take risks - for you, me and everyone else - and I have every confidence it will be a maximum of 18 months to be fully through this, and it won’t always feel so bad because of periods of ease and our ability to adapt - especially if we work at it.

    I would also say your confirmation bias is homing in on negative long-term projections in your despair, so get off the news channels - and maybe avoid discussions on these topics here.

    That was my supportive bit. I will add to that what others have said - if you are having a mental health crisis, please seek professional support either online or through your regular practitioner.

    I also have to say, though.... you are with your family?

    I don’t know when I can next be in the same room with a family member if I stick to (and I will) the travel restrictions. There are lots of people who live alone who would weep with gratitude to be with family right now. We are all finding ways to cope though.

    But really, fucking hell! To actually have what so many people are desperate for right now - the company of loved ones - and still be having a whining tantrum like an infant. Unbelievable.



  • Cameron wrote: »
    There are lots of people who live alone who would weep with gratitude to be with family right now.

    There are others who would weep with gratitude for the opportunity to have a few hours on their own!
  • EutychusEutychus Shipmate
    Dog. Manger.
  • If you are not showing symptoms you can have a few hours on your own. Go for a walk, just stay clear of other people. The government is saying "on your own or with other members of your immediate household" ... that doesn't mean you need to take your immediate family with you for your bit of exercise.
  • CameronCameron Shipmate
    Garden?
    Agree a quiet time and retreat to a bedroom with a book for an hour or two?

    Reinforcing the hopeful point about radical vaccine development protocols.

  • KarlLB wrote: »
    temporary

    My chief anxiety is that it won’t be temporary. There’s no exit strategy. It’s just going to be a constant series of three-week reviews that will all conclude we need to keep doing this. This is life now, and will be for long enough that you might as well call it forever. There are friends I will never see again, not because of Coronavirus but because they will die naturally before we’re allowed to meet up again.

    I think it's perfectly rational to feel as you seem to. This is unprecedented. No-one knows how this is going to end. The analogy to war is very apt. And in our generation, and our developed nations, we have no experience of not having control of our lives. Scared shitless - however calmly and good-humouredly - would be a rational response.

    Accepting we don't have that control, and accepting that we don't know the outcome is going to be a big ask. Some people who have struggled with chronic debilitating or life-threatening illness, or refugee or war situations perhaps have better tools mentally to cope with that. So the human psyche IS up to the task of dealing with what so many of us are now having to deal with for the first time, allowing for those who are particularly vulnerable because of poor mental health and who will need extra support.

    But it is irrational to assume that because it is the new normal, it is also the new 'forever'. We have got to take each day as it comes, with reasonable planning for food buying, a daily walk (if not in the high-risk group being told to stay indoors) and a daily inventory of what we have; a roof, a phone, internet connection with 'outside' interests, well stocked shops, TV, books etc.

    And also in your case loved ones around you. My family are in another country. It's me and the dog here, though I am in constant contact electronically with church members and a couple of good friends are kind enough to send me personal supportive messages. My mum's a relatively healthy 80 year old. But I can't stop my brain thinking the worst. What I can do, however, is phone her, conference call with the family, share jokes, laugh and say how much we love each other and are looking forward to getting together again. I'm really lucky to have all that. And even if the worst does happen, I will still have been lucky to have had all that.

    I can't choose to not let the uncertainty of the situation scare me. But I can and must choose to orient my thinking towards what is good around me, here in this moment; and keeping my brain moving forward to what I can do for, say, the next hour or so, or the next day. Despair is a perfectly natural option for a situation like this. But it's not our only option.
  • that doesn't mean you need to take your immediate family with you for your bit of exercise.

    It does when that immediate family member is only 14 months old and his mother is an essential NHS worker so still going to work.
  • So is your problem being cooped up with a 14 month old?
  • I went for my state mandated exercise this morning. Maintained 2 metres from the early dog walkers (and Ben from running club who was coming up the hill as I was going down).

    You can get out. Do so.
  • that doesn't mean you need to take your immediate family with you for your bit of exercise.

    It does when that immediate family member is only 14 months old and his mother is an essential NHS worker so still going to work.

    Welcome to the experience of motherhood for so many people.
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    Here's the thing: the reason the stupid bloody selfish idiots were out enjoying the sun and acting like they don't care about dying is this: they don't know anyone who's caught the bastard thing so far. When you do, it rather concentrates the mind.

    I know several people who have caught the bastard thing (mostly not confirmed because testing here is restricted to the critically ill, but they have all the symptoms). One is hospitalised. Even for those who aren't, it is a very nasty bugger and they are very unwell. This is not just a little sniffle, and it is terrifyingly contagious. Once it gets up close and personal it rather puts the fear of God in one.

    Being stuck indoors (and yes, I'm also cooped up with a small child, and don't have a garden) isn't the only thing that screws with your mental health. Watching people you care about dropping like flies doesn't exactly lead to mental serenity either.
  • So is your problem being cooped up with a 14 month old?

    Part of it, yes.
  • I used to walk my dog with my 14 month old in a carrier, so got out to walk that way. She often used to go to sleep so I could ignore her and enjoy the solitude.

    It's also working out what you can do with a 14 month old "helping" - and there is a lot. So long as you're prepared to structure things appropriately. Particularly if you've got a garden and can get them helping there too.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    My son was a screamer - walking with him in a carrier was the only way to soothe him to sleep. We walked miles me, the dog and Boogielet 1.

    I came to hell because of this. I can’t tell you how much it upsets me that money seems to be king and people just don’t matter. I fear so much for the US just now. :cry:

    https://tinyurl.com/ucy72nj
  • Sudden shift of topic.

    I few days ago I caught a piece on BBC Breakfast suggesting that for our mental health we need to avoid spending all our time hearing about the virus progression, find other things to watch on TV (or, even turn it off entirely). Today is my first day entirely indoors ... and what have the Beeb done ... yep, cancelled all regular programming on BBC1 to have non-stop updates on the virus. Now, it's not as though I really want to watch Homes Under the Hammer or Wanted Down Under, or whatever else they normally inflict on those who watch TV during the day. But, can't they take their own advice an give people a chance to watch something different? It's not as though there isn't also a 24h new channel carrying essentially the same reports.
  • I'm hardly watching any TV these days. That seems to be keeping me more relaxed than some people who have rung me in a panic.
  • What are the other channels offering? I don't watch TV at all, hence the question!
  • Radio 3 has a few news bulletins, but apart from that, it's mostly music.
  • Podcasts allow you news free radio consumption. Catchup services likewise for tv.
  • Lots and lots of other shows available on i-player.
  • I had my anxiety crisis over Coronavirus about 6 weeks ago, it hit a period when I was most vulnerable, a short overlapping period of depression and hypomania. When I realised it was happening I dropped my internet usage and did something else to distract myself (in my case spinning wool while watching repeats of Poirot; having bipolar disorder often requires me to do two things at once to stop the excess thoughts in my head). Overload of information is a recipe for anxiety. My normal method of managing my mental health is walking 3-4 miles a day but unfortunately I broke my toe in January and have only just started walking again...
    My current issue is that I have been working from home in blissful solitude for the last 12 years but am currently sharing the house with 3 others, including my husband who owns a small tech company and appears to be talking in online meetings all day. As I am currently on sick leave recovering from suspecting Coronavirus, I’m not currently at my most tolerant.
  • I've been finding I need talky-white-noise to help my mind switch off and go to sleep. Music isn't so good as I actually listen to it.

    I ditched Radio4 (my preference) as too much was seeping in and tried BBC Gaelic on the grounds I couldn't understand a word. Worked a treat, until I woke in the middle of the night and it had turned to BBC Scotland or Radio5 (I may have hit a different button). Either way, it was too much again....
  • Sudden shift of topic.

    I few days ago I caught a piece on BBC Breakfast suggesting that for our mental health we need to avoid spending all our time hearing about the virus progression, find other things to watch on TV (or, even turn it off entirely). Today is my first day entirely indoors ... and what have the Beeb done ... yep, cancelled all regular programming on BBC1 to have non-stop updates on the virus. Now, it's not as though I really want to watch Homes Under the Hammer or Wanted Down Under, or whatever else they normally inflict on those who watch TV during the day. But, can't they take their own advice an give people a chance to watch something different? It's not as though there isn't also a 24h new channel carrying essentially the same reports.

    I think this is a really good point. Tonight I'm going to leave the laptop downstairs, though I do feel obliged to keep my mobile handy because of potential church stuff going on. But no laptop means I'm more inclined to mentally switch off a bit. I also have TV in my bedroom but it's not connected to satellite or cable. I can only play DVDs on it. So at night I'm overdosing on my favourite dramas.

    Loads of different TV - old stuff, too, on the other channels. Just keep surfing.
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    For the last week we've only been listening to the news once a day. If we have the radio on the rest of the time it's tuned to a music station. In the evening we watch films, the more mindless the better. Star Wars last night.
  • EutychusEutychus Shipmate
    I mentioned before that I've started LOTR for the nth time, really slowly, in the hope that the confinement will end before I finish. Then again, perhaps I should have opted for Snoopy's approach of reading War and Peace at a rate of one word per day.

    (I have this whole series of cartoons in the house. Somewhere. Another time-consuming project for me would be to dig it out).
  • caroline444caroline444 Shipmate
    edited March 2020
    My normal method of managing my mental health is walking 3-4 miles a day but unfortunately I broke my toe in January and have only just started walking again...
    My current issue is that I have been working from home in blissful solitude for the last 12 years but am currently sharing the house with 3 others, including my husband who owns a small tech company and appears to be talking in online meetings all day. As I am currently on sick leave recovering from suspecting Coronavirus, I’m not currently at my most tolerant.

    I wish you well in coping. It sounds like a coming together of events which could be quite stressful. I hope you have somewhere in the house you can make your own - if only for a few hours at a time. Also very much hope that if it turns out you have the Coronavirus it is a reasonably bearable experience.
  • Lots and lots of other shows available on i-player.

    There's a bunch of different non-TV ideas here: https://www.france24.com/en/20200321-ideas-to-keep-you-culturally-engaged-during-coronavirus-confinement

    Interview style podcasts from before the virus that are still interesting and/or useful as white noise to fall asleep to.

    [Not to mention various publishers who are offering free e-book bundles. ]
  • For the last week we've only been listening to the news once a day. If we have the radio on the rest of the time it's tuned to a music station. In the evening we watch films, the more mindless the better. Star Wars last night.

    Oi! My Cousin Wot Is A Nactor was in Star Wars...(can't quite recall which one, but about 10 years ago?).
    :wink:
  • I have a niece who's name appeared in the credits for Guardians of the Galaxy vol II - a one of the special effects artists. And, how can we forget the Shipmate at the Battle of Helm's Deep?

    But, I should add that I've not actually been watching the TV - it's too much of a distraction when I'm supposed to be working (for me, it's music radio that gives me the background noise that I can ignore but stops the place being silent). Though, I didn't turn off BBC1 as early a I'd normally do - hence my observation of the excessive coverage there. I've plenty to watch over the coming weeks without overdoing the news, when not trying to work.
  • Welcome to the experience of motherhood for so many people.
    Except that in normal conditions, mothers of small children are able to go to mums and tots groups, library story time, and so on to at least get a little interaction with other humans.

    Similarly, someone was saying the other day that everyone's a homeschooler now, because all the schools are closed and the kids are home. Except that that's not what homeschooling is like - normal homeschooling includes trips to museums, classes outside the home, social activities and so on.

    I'll grant that being "stuck at home with a 14 month old" is more like the "experience of motherhood for so many people" than going out to work every day, and having your kids trying to do e-learning at home is more like homeschooling than putting them on the bus in the morning. But they're not the same thing.
  • edited March 2020
    Don't take health advice from a moron who looked directly at s solar eclipse.

    Man dies after taking trumpo advice about chloroquine. https://twitter.com/VaughnHillyard/status/1242258629278875648?s=20
    NBC: Did you see the President's press conference? Where did you hear about--

    Patient: Yeah. Yeah, we saw his press conference. It was on a lot, actually.

    NBC: And then did you did you seek out Chloroquine?

    Patient: I had it in the house because I used to have koi fish. ...Trump kept saying it was basically pretty much a cure."
    NBC: "What would be your message to the American public?"
    Woman: "Oh my God. Don't take anything. Don't believe anything. Don’t believe anything that the President says & his people...call your doctor

    Apparently people clean aquariums with Plod Turd Man's virus cure. Let's drink toilet cleaner too.
  • Online friend has flu-y symptoms and has been tested and waiting for results so that's scary. Someone in our office has tested positive (we've been working from home since a week ago today, so no idea if I even came in contact with them; I was locked away in a training classroom for four weeks before that), which is at least mildly concerning. I'm having to learn a new job entirely remotely (today is my second day "on the floor" doing what I'm doing now). I suppose you could call the latter a first-world problem. But I can lay it at the feet of this fecking virus.
  • Don't take health advice from a moron who looked directly at s solar eclipse.

    Man dies after taking trumpo advice about chloroquine. https://twitter.com/VaughnHillyard/status/1242258629278875648?s=20
    NBC: Did you see the President's press conference? Where did you hear about--

    Patient: Yeah. Yeah, we saw his press conference. It was on a lot, actually.

    NBC: And then did you did you seek out Chloroquine?

    Patient: I had it in the house because I used to have koi fish. ...Trump kept saying it was basically pretty much a cure."
    NBC: "What would be your message to the American public?"
    Woman: "Oh my God. Don't take anything. Don't believe anything. Don’t believe anything that the President says & his people...call your doctor

    Apparently people clean aquariums with Plod Turd Man's virus cure. Let's drink toilet cleaner too.

    The same chemical is used in Malaria medication and aquarium cleaner. The problem is ignoring all the other substances with it!
  • Welcome to the experience of motherhood for so many people.
    Except that in normal conditions, mothers of small children are able to go to mums and tots groups, library story time, and so on to at least get a little interaction with other humans.

    I've been close to where Marvin is - we only had one car until my son was about 3, and my husband used it to go to work every day, so we couldn't go anywhere outside of walking distance. I also unexpectedly had to quit a job I loved when my son was a newborn, because of other family turmoil happening at the time, and didn't go back to work until he was four. So believe me, I understand what it's like to suddenly be isolated at home (no relatives lived closer to us than 600 miles), completely unprepared for the day-to-day demands of having a small child. It is HARD. But you can do it. And, bright side, all your friends are now unexpectedly isolated too - they'll probably be happy to chat with you and share ideas and let you blow off steam.

    Also, you probably won't be stranded the whole time until the vaccine is ready. Once they can start testing enough people to know exactly where the virus is and isolate the sick people, the restrictions on the rest of us can be eased. The shortage of tests and protective gear is just a manufacturing problem, and an idiot politician problem.

    Try to get the baby outdoors for a walk every day, if you can.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    And, how can we forget the Shipmate at the Battle of Helm's Deep?

    McChicken of the cheesy grin!!! Daughter-Unit and I yell his name every time we watch the film!!!
  • And, bright side, all your friends are now unexpectedly isolated too - they'll probably be happy to chat with you and share ideas and let you blow off steam.

    Problem with that is that I’m also supposed to be spending 7 or so hours each day working from home, and my boss has been very understanding about me having the wean with me and said that if I can’t manage it during normal hours he’s happy for me to make up the difference in the evening or overnight.
  • CameronCameron Shipmate
    Can you go part-time for a while? Your outgoings are perforce reduced at this time (the lure of internet shopping notwithstanding), so it may be affordable. If your employer is in the private sector they would probably be glad to reduce the salary bill for a while right now. If your employer is in the public sector similar thoughts may also apply, in addition to which you may have the option by right.
  • Cameron wrote: »
    Can you go part-time for a while? Your outgoings are perforce reduced at this time (the lure of internet shopping notwithstanding), so it may be affordable.

    Not really affordable, unless it were a PT workload so slightly below FT as to make very little difference. Main outgoings are stuff like mortgage, utilities and TV/broadband which are all still going to need to be paid over the next weeks/months.
  • Our can opener died. Eating tinned food will be a little more difficult.

    Also I am dying for a cookie/biscuit. May have to dust off the ol' apron and fire up the oven.
  • I'm not sure I remember the last time I used a can opener ... all our tins seem to have ring pulls to open them. Can openers are going the way of the corkscrew to get into a bottle of wine.
  • Maybe the pull-top cans are more prevalent over there than over here. Had a very nice bottle of Chianti Classico last night that required a corkscrew, and was glad I had one to hand.
  • I must admit, the temptation to drink very heavily is weighing on me unexpectedly. I like a pint or two, but know to stop early. While my life has changed very little over the last few weeks, the emotional load is starting to drag.

    I'm going to hide the booze, so I hear its call less.
  • mousethief, you need a Swiss Army knife. Mine has both a corkscrew AND a can opener. Plus scissors for those who may also need to roll something to cope. ;-)
  • TwilightTwilight Shipmate
    Welcome to the experience of motherhood for so many people.
    Except that in normal conditions, mothers of small children are able to go to mums and tots groups, library story time, and so on to at least get a little interaction with other humans.

    I've been close to where Marvin is - we only had one car until my son was about 3, and my husband used it to go to work every day, so we couldn't go anywhere outside of walking distance. I also unexpectedly had to quit a job I loved when my son was a newborn, because of other family turmoil happening at the time, and didn't go back to work until he was four.

    All true for me, too and come to think of it my mother raised the three of us with no car and nothing at all was in walking distance. This world of play-groups, museum and library trips, is fairly new to the world.

    What did we do all day? As I remember, it was a little laundry, an old black and white movie on TV while building something with blocks for the baby to knock down, some cleaning, reading the paper and writing an angry letter to the editor (what we did before message boards), nap time, make dinner, read, sleep. If we could pass four years that way a few months should be possible.

    We are so lucky to have some good TV, DVD's, the internet, the radio, the ability to call family long distance without spending a week's pay.

    I've been tempted for years to play cards online but feared addition, because I love cards. Now might be the moment.

  • mousethief wrote: »
    Maybe the pull-top cans are more prevalent over there than over here. Had a very nice bottle of Chianti Classico last night that required a corkscrew, and was glad I had one to hand.

    Maybe this will help ?
  • Dave WDave W Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    Maybe the pull-top cans are more prevalent over there than over here. Had a very nice bottle of Chianti Classico last night that required a corkscrew, and was glad I had one to hand.

    Maybe this will help ?
    Huh - clever tips! It occurs to me that method 2 (rubbing top of can on concrete or large rock to wear through metal) might not work as well with soup as it did with the refried beans.
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