One ring to rule them all!

When I was about 10 I remember fantasising about swapping the boring bibles in church for the Lord of the Rings.

Well, here's the Dean of Canterbury reading this during morning prayer:

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them,
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

https://youtu.be/kGZ54KPKmN8?t=1004

Has anyone else come across the use of LOTR during a service? This isn't just a passing mention, he even name checks the third Elf Lord, Círdan without batting an eyelid, something even I couldn't have done.

How about other fantasy literature? I imagine Narnia might get some mentions, but to be quoted so extensively?



Comments

  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    yohan300 wrote: »
    When I was about 10 I remember fantasising about swapping the boring bibles in church for the Lord of the Rings.

    Well, here's the Dean of Canterbury reading this during morning prayer:

    Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
    Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
    Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
    One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
    In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
    One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
    One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them,
    In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

    https://youtu.be/kGZ54KPKmN8?t=1004

    Has anyone else come across the use of LOTR during a service? This isn't just a passing mention, he even name checks the third Elf Lord, Círdan without batting an eyelid, something even I couldn't have done.

    How about other fantasy literature? I imagine Narnia might get some mentions, but to be quoted so extensively?



    Disappointingly he pronounced Círdan wrongly. Should have a hard C.
  • I remember hearing a LOTR reference in a sermon ages ago but can't remember anything but the mere fact, certainly not any of the context. There's a cartoon going around where the priest at a wedding is saying "one ring to rule them all" when the groom's ring is being placed on his finger, then is told by the assistant (acolyte or something) "Wrong book, Father."
  • KarlLB wrote: »
    Disappointingly he pronounced Círdan wrongly. Should have a hard C.

    And this is why the Ship is so great.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited September 4
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Disappointingly he pronounced Círdan wrongly. Should have a hard C.

    And this is why the Ship is so great.
    Círdan, being a shipwright, would approve of that observation.

  • TelfordTelford Shipmate
    edited September 4
    yohan300 wrote: »
    When I was about 10 I remember fantasising about swapping the boring bibles in church for the Lord of the Rings.

    Well, here's the Dean of Canterbury reading this during morning prayer:

    Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
    Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
    Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
    One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
    In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
    One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
    One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them,
    In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

    https://youtu.be/kGZ54KPKmN8?t=1004

    Has anyone else come across the use of LOTR during a service? This isn't just a passing mention, he even name checks the third Elf Lord, Círdan without batting an eyelid, something even I couldn't have done.

    How about other fantasy literature? I imagine Narnia might get some mentions, but to be quoted so extensively?



    I have no idea what the Dean would be on about
  • yohan300 wrote: »
    How about other fantasy literature? I imagine Narnia might get some mentions, but to be quoted so extensively?

    For whatever reason, possibly my insufficient theological education and reading, my brain short-circuits to Narnia allusions about half the time when I write a sermon.
  • Leorning CnihtLeorning Cniht Shipmate
    edited September 4
    yohan300 wrote: »
    How about other fantasy literature? I imagine Narnia might get some mentions, but to be quoted so extensively?

    My current priest is a Star Trek fan, so we've had a few Star Trek-themed sermons. Oh, and superheroes. Captain Marvel got referenced recently, and I'm pretty sure we had Spiderman at one point. And we had a visiting speaker reference Earthsea, although only briefly, and I think only a minority of the congregation recognized the reference.

    Oh - Harry Potter has shown up a few times.

    I think with any kind of literary / cultural reference, you need something that is familiar to most of your audience. In terms of fantasy, that probably pretty much limits you to LoTR, Narnia, and Potter, perhaps with Phillip Pullman in fourth place.
  • Would you include Discworld as fantasy?
  • yohan300 wrote: »
    How about other fantasy literature? I imagine Narnia might get some mentions, but to be quoted so extensively?

    My current priest is a Star Trek fan, so we've had a few Star Trek-themed sermons.
    I do hope that when your priest has those Star Trek-themed sermons, he or she also uses Eucharistic Prayer C (aka the “Star Trek Canon” or the “Star Wars Canon”) from the ‘79 prayerbook. :naughty:

    Speaking of which:
    I think with any kind of literary / cultural reference, you need something that is familiar to most of your audience. In terms of fantasy, that probably pretty much limits you to LoTR, Narnia, and Potter, perhaps with Phillip Pullman in fourth place.
    To the extent I’ve heard such cultural references in a sermon, which hasn’t been that often, I’ve probably heard more Star Wars references than all others combined. I think Pullman references would be completely lost on lots of congregations I know, me included. (As, to be honest, would be any but the most basic Star Trek references.)

    I have to say, though, much as I love LOTR (and I do!), and much as I appreciate the remembrance of Tolkien on the anniversary of his death (I remember reading of his death in the newspaper), I really couldn’t figure out what the dean’s extensive discourse on LOTR had to do with Paul, or with anything else for that matter. It was almost like, “And speaking of Paul, here’s an interesting story about Middle Earth. . . . [10 minutes later] Sam was at the end of a long journey, and Paul is just starting his.”

  • yohan300 wrote: »
    How about other fantasy literature? I imagine Narnia might get some mentions, but to be quoted so extensively?

    My current priest is a Star Trek fan, so we've had a few Star Trek-themed sermons.
    I am known/infamous for regular references to Star Trek in my sermons. My final sermon in my first parish ended with 'Make it so...'!
  • HarryCHHarryCH Shipmate
    When the first "Star Wars" movie came out, I heard a rather incoherent sermon that referred to it.
  • My final sermon in my first parish ended with 'Make it so...'!
    But that's totally Scriptural. The Greek is 'genoito' (sorry, don't know how to insert Greek script here), usually translated as 'Amen' and said twice.

  • cgichard wrote: »
    My final sermon in my first parish ended with 'Make it so...'!
    But that's totally Scriptural. The Greek is 'genoito' (sorry, don't know how to insert Greek script here), usually translated as 'Amen' and said twice.

    That's always been my excuse!
  • Well, Captain Picard's other well-known instruction - 'Engage!' - is also a popular word in church circles these days...
    :wink:

    Whilst on the subject of Star Trek , I always rather liked the chapel on Deep Space Nine, where the Bajorans held a sort of Vespers at about 5pm IIRC.

    Quite an appealing 'Sacred Space', IMHO, but I can't at the moment find an online image (IYSWIM)
  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    at any rate social distancing could be problematic
  • Well, Captain Picard's other well-known instruction - 'Engage!' - is also a popular word in church circles these days...
    :wink:

    Whilst on the subject of Star Trek , I always rather liked the chapel on Deep Space Nine, where the Bajorans held a sort of Vespers at about 5pm IIRC.

    Quite an appealing 'Sacred Space', IMHO, but I can't at the moment find an online image (IYSWIM)

    Is this what you were looking for: https://memory-alpha.fandom.com/wiki/Bajoran_temple
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited September 10
    Yes, that's the one!

    I forgot that it was known as a 'temple', and it's certainly smaller than I remember...but lots of places for prayer, and lots of candles...on special occasions, anyway.
    :wink:
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