The Untied Kingdom? - the British thread 2021

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  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    I went to a disco advertised for 'oldies' yesterday. It was fun, but it was mostly eighties stuff which is way past my era, so I obviously need a older oldies disco. Still it was good to be out about and things almost being 'normal' whatever that is.
  • HeavenlyannieHeavenlyannie Shipmate
    edited September 12
    Look what you two have made me do! It is the order day for the meat and veg delivery and they appear to have ruby veal and Bambi (and pigeon breast but I have to pace myself) available…

    Another quiet and lazy day. I even had a lie in which is quite unlike me. Off for a short walk and then I’m going to make crab apple jelly.
  • Sarasa wrote: »
    I went to a disco advertised for 'oldies' yesterday. It was fun, but it was mostly eighties stuff which is way past my era, so I obviously need a older oldies disco. Still it was good to be out about and things almost being 'normal' whatever that is.

    You need to look for adverts for a "tea dance" ;)
  • Lol!
    The wedding I went to a few weeks ago had a fabulous disco which catered for most of the guests being 30-50; lots of 80s and 90s and occasional 2000s. I was surprised at the lack of 70s.
    One of the Greenbelt discos was fantastically ‘disco’, a glorious mix of clubbable 70s and 80s.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    If a wedding has a disco I normally concoct an excuse to leave before it happens.
  • Not too big a problem Karl; you must be past the age to be invited to a lot of weddings….
  • @Wesley J - I doubt very much the kings and knights of yore were eating anything more than the liver and other offal after grollicking the recently slaughtered beast. The rest of the meat needs to hang to be edible, a week to 10 days for preference, at least, depnding on weather.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Sojourner wrote: »
    Not too big a problem Karl; you must be past the age to be invited to a lot of weddings….

    Coming into the period where I'm the parents' generation.
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    Mmmm chevreuil.

    I don't think the season for shooting Bambi has opened here yet. There's usually a farmers' market in October that sells game. Wild boar is generally available, although we prefer to casserole it than to roast it like Asterix.

    A fairly lazy day for us. Captain Pyjamas woke up in a pother at 6:15 (nightmare I think) but after that we all slept to the rather civilised hour of 8:45. We went out to buy flowers and desserts and shall be lunching off pork sauteed with mirabelle plums.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Sufficiently (but not completely) recovered from stomach bug of the past week to do necessary house cleaning, so as not to return to scenes of Utter Squalor when we get back from Ireland.

    Slightly wondering just how many corpsed wasps I will be coming back to. The continuing mild weather means they are still coming in, but I have the window area well sprayed with WaspDeath. Some mornings I've just got out the vacuum cleaner.

    Tomorrow the ironing and packing.
  • KarlLB wrote: »
    Sojourner wrote: »
    Not too big a problem Karl; you must be past the age to be invited to a lot of weddings….

    Coming into the period where I'm the parents' generation.

    I have to be grateful that none of my 3 “do” marriage nor do their friends. The few weddings of nephews and nieces who insisted on weddings( all unbelievers) were excruciating.


  • Beaky daughter number three (there are four of them 😬😅 I know that's a lot but it wasn't planned and it's a long story) is due here for lunch. I have opened a bottle of Viognier which was on special offer at Waitrose and it is utterly delicious and the sun is showing its face too 😍
  • Good
  • Celtic KnotweedCeltic Knotweed Shipmate
    edited September 12
    Sandemaniac has just left for cricket. Since it's the annual over-40s v under-40s match, I will wander along later and cheer both sides (this year we have not only the 2 sons of one over-40 playing in the under-40s, but also his daughter :grin: ).

    Dinner has been set up in the slow-cooker and will be pigeon breasts with courgettes, green pepper, tomatos, preserved lemon, and a generous spoon of harissa paste. So I can now have a leisurely lunch and do some random housework interspersed with reading till I fancy biking over to watch cricketers.

    Edit - and do some laundry before the ninjas climb out of the basket again (yes, we do seem to wear a lot of black...)
  • MrsBeaky wrote: »
    Beaky daughter number three (there are four of them 😬😅 I know that's a lot but it wasn't planned and it's a long story) is due here for lunch. I have opened a bottle of Viognier which was on special offer at Waitrose and it is utterly delicious and the sun is showing its face too 😍
    Not a lot at all - my parents had 4 daughters AND 4 sons 😛
    Enjoy the lunch and wine.
  • 8 is a lot even by RC standards, don’t have yourself on
  • Anyway, HA , yours cheated-with twins😜
  • I can’t begin to imagine how my mother felt, having already had 6 children and then being told she was expecting twins.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I'm having a usual lazy Sunday so far, although laundry will ensue shortly, and while it's laundering, I'll amble down to Tessie's to stock up the porcine fridge and larder for the coming week.

    It's going to be an odd sort of week, as I'm taking Tuesday and Wednesday off work, then back for a couple of days and then a long weekend, as Monday 20th is a public holiday in Embra.

    I'll have even less of a clue than usual about what day it is ...
  • I can’t begin to imagine how my mother felt, having already had 6 children and then being told she was expecting twins.


    Could have been worse; imagine undiagnosed twins. Common enough pre-ultrasound. I saw more than a few as a very junior doctor in a district hospital
    40 years ago when the nearest ( not very good) machine was 15 km away…usually got called in at the last minute to put in an IV then do the suturing afterwards
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Piglet wrote: »
    I'm having a usual lazy Sunday so far, although laundry will ensue shortly, and while it's laundering, I'll amble down to Tessie's to stock up the porcine fridge and larder for the coming week.

    It's going to be an odd sort of week, as I'm taking Tuesday and Wednesday off work, then back for a couple of days and then a long weekend, as Monday 20th is a public holiday in Embra.

    I'll have even less of a clue than usual about what day it is ...

    “Alexa, what day is it?” :lol:

    Today is a decluttering day, two drawers and a cupboard so far. Now my reward - a coffee and a wander round the Ship. ☕️

  • HeavenlyannieHeavenlyannie Shipmate
    edited September 12
    I was born in the 1960s so I guess we might have been undiagnosed but I’m presume not as she never said.
    When I was a student nurse, a staff nurse (dating a porter) went to casualty with abdominal pain and delivered a baby. She was tall and well built and she apparently just thought she’d put on a bit of weight. No chance of that happening with me, I’m so short that I am obviously pregnant within 3 months and spend most of my pregnancies looking like a beach ball.
  • I was also born in the 60s and my mother had the opposite experience. She was told I was twins, but I turned out not to be! The doctor had heard two heart beats at one point but when I turned out to be one they concluded that one had been an echo. My mother was offered Thalidomide when pregnant with me. So glad she turned it down.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Cathscats wrote: »
    I was also born in the 60s and my mother had the opposite experience. She was told I was twins, but I turned out not to be! The doctor had heard two heart beats at one point but when I turned out to be one they concluded that one had been an echo. My mother was offered Thalidomide when pregnant with me. So glad she turned it down.

    Mine too!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited September 12
    I don't know whether mine was (I was born in 1962), but I suspect she wasn't offered it, as she was the sort who would do what a doctor said because he was a doctor ...

    It makes me wonder - would people turning down Thalidomide back then have been treated with the same disdain that we treat "anti-vaxxers" today?

    Edit: now I think about it, I'm not really comparing like with like, because Thalidomide was a treatment for morning sickness (wasn't it?), so it wasn't going to benefit anyone else in the way a vaccine does.

    Further edit: according to Wikipedia, it was removed from sale in Europe in November 1961, so it could have been offered to my mother.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Cathscats wrote: »
    I was also born in the 60s and my mother had the opposite experience. She was told I was twins, but I turned out not to be! The doctor had heard two heart beats at one point but when I turned out to be one they concluded that one had been an echo. My mother was offered Thalidomide when pregnant with me. So glad she turned it down.

    Mine was too 🤔

  • Thalidomide was offered to my mother, and she turned it down. I came across quite a few Thalidomide children when I was younger, but haven't seen anyone for years. Apparently according to this BBC article there aren't many left in Britain now, and those who are are very disabled.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Thalidomide was offered to my mother, and she turned it down. I came across quite a few Thalidomide children when I was younger, but haven't seen anyone for years. Apparently according to this BBC article there aren't many left in Britain now, and those who are are very disabled.

    I have an acquaintance who is. Her husband is blind and he pushes her wheelchair while she gives verbal direction. She has the typical tiny legs and arms. They are an amazing couple and attend all Church special events in the district, whatever the denomination.

  • Apparently according to this BBC article there aren't many left in Britain now, and those who are are very disabled.
    I’m not sure that we can take this as universally true. See, for example, Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Spiers on Archdeacon Pete Stiles:
    Spiers was born with phocomelia as a consequence of the drug thalidomide, although he does not think of himself as disabled.
  • I seem to recall that Thalidomide was offered to women with severe morning sickness.
  • DoublethinkDoublethink Purgatory Host
    Oddly, it remains an effective treatment for leprosy.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    It's also given as one of the drugs for myeloma. (Mr F had to promise to not get anyone pregnant while taking it. Had he done so, cancer would have been the least of his worries...)
  • @Fawkes Cat - the article mentions deteriorating joints being disabling as there is more pressure on those joints that are active - so rheumatism and arthritis causing disability. I found the research - survey with returns from 371 of the 451 known people, allowed to be anonymised but most chose to write in their names.

    It also took until the 80s to work out why thalidomide had a tetrogenic effect.
  • HeavenlyannieHeavenlyannie Shipmate
    edited September 12
    Perhaps part of the issue here is that although something might be disabling, someone may not necessarily identify themselves as disabled.
  • On Archdeacon Pete Spier's Twitter feed, there is a link to this handy demonstration of Assumption by some church youngsters: here. :D
  • Wesley J wrote: »
    On Archdeacon Pete Spier's Twitter feed, there is a link to this handy demonstration of Assumption by some church youngsters: here. :D

    It is perhaps relevant to this tangent to confirm that Archdeacon Pete is not from the Anglo-Catholic end of the Anglican communion...
  • I had a friend in school who had deformed hands. I never noticed until she came out with us one Saturday and my mother commented on it once we were home.
    I have often wondered if she was a thalidomide victim.
  • Firenze wrote: »
    It's also given as one of the drugs for myeloma. (Mr F had to promise to not get anyone pregnant while taking it. Had he done so, cancer would have been the least of his worries...)

    Dad was also on thalidomide for myeloma, and likewise had to promise not to get anyone pregnant. Mum was 83 so no risk there. I think Dad was pleased that they thought he might be able to attract a woman who would have had to have been less than half his age for pregnancy to be a risk.

    It's a nasty drug - Dad had to come off it when he developed peripheral neuropathy.
  • The survivors are 59-60 years old. The commonest deformities were with limb bud development ( 6-7 weeks’ gestation) in particular with development of long bones resulting in what was called “ phocomelia” or seal limbs= flippers. The children born with major cardiac and kidney defects generally did not survive infancy.
  • Yoga class this morning, which went well. This afternoon I've caught up on a few bits of admin. Got a phone call from work, last week I was told there wasn't the extra group I wanted available for me on a module I teach but today they phoned to say they could give me another one after all (we get a lot of late student registrations). This is great news as I have taken a year out from another module as I was not enjoying it, and now I can resign from that one.
    I'm off for a walk now the sun is out.
  • Wesley J wrote: »
    On Archdeacon Pete Spier's Twitter feed, there is a link to this handy demonstration of Assumption by some church youngsters: here. :D

    They're not getting much altitude on the poor old BVM, are they? My kids have a similar device, and have managed to launch rather more functional missiles over the house on a good day. It's a bit disappointing that none of the kids even managed to get the BVM to head height.

  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Assumption of the BVM a big thing in Germany - as we discovered when trying to find accommodation while touring. Goes by the appealing designation Maria Himmelfahrt.
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    I don't believe in the Assumption of the Virgin. OTOH the public holiday which it affords me I can definitely get on board with.

    Having leftover egg whites in my fridge, I have made chocolate macaroons. I fear they are going to last an obscenely short time.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    It's turned into a rather dreich, mizzly evening here; the rain almost held off until I got home, but not quite.

    As I'm having a sort of "extra weekend", I've put a steak in to marinate, and will accompany it with spuds, mushrooms, broccoli and green beans.

    And WINE, obviously ...
  • I have raging toothache, so 'dinner' was was a small bowl of stewed rhubarb and cream - the only substance in the fridge that needed neither preparation nor chewing.

    The tooth in question is badly broken, and has a long history (1975, my first pregnancy) and has undergone years of treatment. It has finally reached the stage when my dentist can do no more and I am due to have it dug out under sedation in two weeks.
    It has been mostly painless for all these years, so why couldn't it have stayed that way for another fortnight!?
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Poor you - there are few things worse than toothache.
  • My sympathies with the toothache, my tooth problems started with a crumbling tooth during pregnancy and it was a relief to have it (and it’s later compatriot) removed.

    Was going to go for a walk but it is currently peeing down. Might have to start work early instead and see if I can find a gap in the clouds later.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Owch - hope you soon get rid of it @Roseofsharon ❤️‍🩹
  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    Anyway you can get an earlier appointment @Roseofsharon . I really hope my teeth continue to behave as my trusted dentist is now 150 miles away.
    It's miserable weather here and I'm not feeling inclined to do anything much. I have a jigsaw on the go, some knitting in hand and a short story I'm supposed to be writing but aren't. Plenty to keep me busy.
  • kingsfold wrote: »
    Wet Kipper wrote: »
    The BBC Shows mailing list has just sent me a message about the Zoom recordings for the new series of Just A Minute.
    Evenings of August 12, 19 and 25th.
    If you're interested in joining the ballot for tickets send me a PM and I'll give you the link

    Well, I didn't get Just A Minute back in August, but I've fallen lucky with tickets for 2 recordings of the News Quiz over the next month :mrgreen:

    I'm looking forward to it/them, so thanks for the sign-up link @Wet Kipper

    You're welcome. I actually got to attend the recording of the first in this News Quiz series at the start of the month
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