Who were you named after?

BoogieBoogie Shipmate
edited March 2 in Heaven
My parents chose Margaret just because they liked the name. My Grandma insisted I was named after her daughter who died of asthma aged eleven. I wasn’t - although, looking at the photos of her Margaret, she was very beautiful - so I didn’t mind!

I should have been Jennifer, but the woman next door had a baby the day before I arrived and named her Jennifer, my Mum didn’t want us to have the same name, so Margaret it was. I really like the name Jennifer.

Only two people on Earth call me Margaret, my SIL and my friend Shaun - both say because it‘s a lovely name. My Dad started calling me Mags when I was a baby so I don’t recognise Margaret as me at all.

I know some people here like to be anonymous so a discussion of names could be limiting, but we’ll see. :)


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Comments

  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    First name for two of my mother’s uncles and her maternal grandfather. Middle name for my father’s maternal grandmother’s maiden name - my mother declining the suggestion of his mother’s maiden name.
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    Pass. I think it may have been a sibling of my mama who died in infancy; other names are saints/family.
  • LandlubberLandlubber Shipmate
    No connection or connotation, as far as I can tell. I only have one given name. My parents always said they could not think of another - as I was their first child I feared my siblings might not get any name at all, but the whole thing was made worse by the fact that they have two each.
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    My father, my maternal grandfather and my paternal grandfather in that order of names. My mother was given one set of names only to be named after her mother when her mother died less than 2 weeks after giving birth.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Me? Karl Marx
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    My father, born on 17th March, wanted me to be Patricia, but my mother didn't like it, so they went for a character played in a current film by Deanna Durbin. She must have impressed people. In a private school class of about 12, there were three of us.
    Then, when I went home from Sunday School full of a David having been told that there was a story about someone with his name in the Bible, Mum told me there was a story attached to my name in a book older than the Bible, so off I went to the library and Homer.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    I was named for my dearly-beloved great-aunt Gertie, who raised my mother, but THANK GOODNESS my parents decided not to go the Full Gertrude and just put "Trudy" on my birth certificate. I don't like it much (my middle name is much better and I wish they'd gone with that) but it's far better than Gertrude or Gertie.
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    edited March 2
    My father, and my paternal grandfather before him. I am strictly speaking not "the Third," however, as my middle name is different from my father's. Mine was taken from my uncle, one of his brothers. My father wanted my middle name to be a nickname he was called as a young boy, which is actually a diminutive of his first name in Italian, but he was overruled.

    My mother wanted to name me after her father's (my maternal grandfather's) middle name, but as he was something of a black sheep, the rest of the family overruled her.

    My confirmation name: Supposed to be that of a saint. A man who lived across the street from us had just died. I was sure he had gone to heaven, and so I chose his name as my confirmation name.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    My great-grandfather—my mother’s paternal grandfather, so my middle name is my mother’s maiden. Both names reflect the family’s Scottish background.

    My confirmation name: Supposed to be that of a saint. A man who lived across the street from us had just died. I was sure he had gone to heaven, and so I chose his name as my confirmation name.
    I can’t tell you how much I like this! :smiley:

  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    My middle name is a family name - it was my paternal great-grandmother's name, and also the name of my maternal grandmother's little sister who died in infancy.

    However, given that I was born in 1979, that's not what most people assume when they hear the name Margaret. I think my Dad rather regretted it afterwards.

    (Not telling you my first name :tongue: )
  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    My confirmation name: Supposed to be that of a saint. A man who lived across the street from us had just died. I was sure he had gone to heaven, and so I chose his name as my confirmation name.
    My gosh, I had forgotten this. As you say, a confirmation name is supposed to be that of a saint. In my family, my brothers and I all used my father's name: Arthur.

    Not, shall we say, one of the better known saints.

    My older brothers had to fight to get approval to use Arthur as their confirmation name. By the time I came around, though, the pastor just let it go. "Oh, it's THAT family again..."
  • Fawkes CatFawkes Cat Shipmate
    My father was baptised Reginald*: he can't abide the name and insists on being known as Reg.#

    My mother was baptised Gertrude#, and couldn't abide being known as Gert or Gertie#, insisting on Gertrude throughout her life.

    So when we were born, Mum and Dad decided the solution was to give us all single-syllable names which couldn't be shortened.

    Hence Fawkes~. This name turns out to be something of a penance if you grow up in an industrial town just outside London. And it also turns out (half a century later, and in a port city in the North West) that Fawkes can be transformed to 'Fawko', this gaining an extra syllable after all.

    *Not really, but attempting to maintain some anonymity here
    # See *
    ~ See *, but the same applies to my actual given name
  • amyboamybo Shipmate
    I got a pretty name. No special meaning.

    As for my kid - my husband's family has a tradition of naming kids after ancestors, so when his father died, I promised we'd name our kid after him. A few years later and we can't name the kid after BOTH grandpas, because then he'd have the exact same name of his paternal grandpa. Instead, I insisted on giving the baby my grandpa's first name as his middle name, as he shared a birthday with both men.

    And that is the story of how I named my 3-year-old after the two most stubborn old goats I have ever known. At least it rolls off the tongue when I call him by both names, which is frequent.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    First name = mother's name. Second name (by which I go) - dunno. I think the nurse suggested it.

    My mother came by her name after a cousin on her mother's side who died young. When I went up to uni, one of my first friends - whom I have yet - had the identical name to that long dead girl. Given the geographical proximity, a degree of actual cousinage may be involved, but we never bothered tracing it.

    One thing about the name I go by - I do feel it's my real name. I have known female friends who didn't feel they belonged to their names: one even changed hers.
  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    I'm named after Nicole Diver in the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel Tender is the Night. Not much of a compliment if you consider the plot of the book, but my parents were odd. My middle name, Mary, is family.
  • I have no idea whatsoever about why my parents named me. At least my eldest brothers had middle names that reflected my dad's family traditions (Francis and Thomas). And my sister was named Barbara Anne because of the Beach Boys (not that my parents liked that sort of music - they were into Acker Bilk and Kenny Ball).

    True story. When my eldest SIL was born, her parents were going to name her one way, but her grandmother got ahead of them and registered the birth before they could and so she had the name Margaret.
  • TelfordTelford Ship-mate
    Nobody that I know of but Telford is named after the great Colossus of Roads...and canals and bridges and docks and churches
  • SparrowSparrow Shipmate
    As I understand it, my mother had a name she wanted to use for me, but my Dad wanted another name he had taken a fancy to because a colleague at work had a fiancee with that name! My middle name was that of my mother's sister, who became my godmother.

  • My first name which I don't use is after a deceased relative, with the other given name randomly assigned by my parents, which is the one I use a two versions of mostly. In work, I'm called by a different name than that. My brother and I call my sisters by names different than any one else does. My brother and I also call each other the same nick name which can confuse the others. He has two perfectly good given names and is called something completely different by everyone.
  • My name is Ann, after my grandmother Lucy Ann (and her sister Rose Anna). I've been called Annie by virtually everyone who isn't family since I became a nurse aged 18 years old - my patients started calling me it.
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    My parents specifically didn't name my brother or me after relatives. They thought there might be hard feelings from those who weren't honored. My name was a pretty popular one in my era as a name for teenage characters. A beloved actress had the name, although I don't think my folks were particular fans. They just liked the name. Same with my brother's name. But we do have middle names drawn from my mom's maiden names. Since we would have my dad's surname, they wanted my mom's names in there, too. Nice!
  • MMMMMM Shipmate
    I don’t know why I was given my name, I assume my parents liked it. People I have met who share my name are all in a range of 10 years either side of me, so I assume it had a brief, mild popularity in the 50s to 60s.

    There are 2 ways of spelling my name: the way my mother wanted it spelt and the way the Registrar spelt it on my birth certificate. If you look at letters/photos etc from my babyhood, my mother has always written my name the way she wanted it spelt; as soon as I started learning to write, I started spelling it the other way, which prevailed at some stage.

    MMM
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    I was named after a trade: maker of wheels. My folks wanted a name that could not be shortened.
  • I named my son after his grandfather and mine,so he'd have both cultures as well as both sides of the family. But I regret giving him only my grandfather's first name; I discovered later that the middle name (Lafayette) has been borne together with the first name by several generations of our family ever since the Revolutionary War, in honor of (whom else!) the Marquis de la Fayette. (I think it possible that my son does NOT regret that decision.)
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    Gramps49 wrote: »
    I was named after a trade: maker of wheels. My folks wanted a name that could not be shortened.

    You're called Wheelwright? 😯
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    I was named after my mom's play name, Judy White because she loved Judy Garland. Her sister, Lucy Ann ( @Heavenlyannie !) , had the play name Pretty White. My middle name was discovered after Mom and Dad were married and went fishing on Lake Erie. The boat they were on was named the Judy C..... Therefore, I was named after a boat, the opposite way of how those things usually go.
  • JapesJapes Shipmate
    edited March 2
    My first name is just one my mum liked when I was born. There were one or two famous people with the name at the time, and other people have assumed I was named after them, but that is not so. I'd've prefered their spelling of the name, though, as being the more well-known one and the one always assumed by someone else meeting me for the first time. But, I'm used to my variant by now. My dad wanted something else but lost the argument.

    My middle name is my mother's first name, as is family tradition. There's actually quite a straightforward procedure for this, but it fails at my sister who should have had either grandmother's first name, but one grandmother did not want her name perpetuated as she had always hated it, and one parent hated their mother so much (for good reason, I may say) that name didn't get used!
  • We have this weird down-the-other-side-of-the-family tradition where the second daughter gets her mother's first name as her middle name. We thought it had run out when my sister had only boys, but realized years later that in fact she had given her second son a male version of her own name--so things carry on...
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    We wanted our sons to have names which were ordinary and didn’t date so we chose Michael and Andrew.

    I wanted Matthew but my husband said ‘no, he’ll get called Matt and people walk on mats’. 🤔
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    We have this weird down-the-other-side-of-the-family tradition where the second daughter gets her mother's first name as her middle name.
    It has long been common—though certainly not universal*—in the American South for second sons to be given and go by the mother’s maiden names (first sons having been given their father’s name).

    Surnames as given names are common here. Our son’s middle name was my grandmother’s maiden name and my wife’s great grandmother’s maiden name. When we realized, years before he was born, that the name was on both sides of the family, we decided that’s what we’d name a son.

    *Obviously there are surnames that don’t lend themselves to this convention.

  • Boogie wrote: »
    We wanted our sons to have names which were ordinary and didn’t date so we chose Michael and Andrew.
    We were the opposite, we wanted names where they could answer the phone with their first name and be immediately identified.
    And they have their own pieces of music - though Zadok wins the prize there.
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    My name is my mother's middle name which was my maternal grandmother's mother's first name. My middle name "Judith" was because my mother thought I looked Jewish at birth - but it was really just neo-natal jaundice!
  • My nan reckons I was named after a Crossroads character but my mum says I wasn’t and it was just a name they liked. In hindsight she wishes she’d called me my a longer name and used this one as a diminutive.
  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    I have a name that can't be shorted, and I always wished I'd had a name like Elizabeth where you can chose loads of different short names. Like MMM my name was really popular in the 1950s and if you weren't called it or a similar slightly longer one you were likely to be called Sue. My middle name is my mother's name, and my brother's middle name is Charles which seems to have been a name in my dad's family for a century or two. His son has it as one of his names though his other names are rather more unusual.
  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    My first name was in my father’s adoptive family. My middle name goes back several generations in my mother’s family. My grandmother was Mary Elizabeth, but she was known as Liz, my mother was Hannah Elizabeth - Betty, and I’m (first name) Elizabeth. I’m known as C***, a shortened form of my first name, but Mam would never call me that - it was drummed into me as a child - your name’s C******** not C***, and she always called me by my full name whereas Dad would call me C***.
    I had a good friend who’s name sounded the same as mine, but hers was with a K. We used to take great pleasure in ringing each other - “Hello K***, it’s C***” As she said, I could see the K in front of her name and she could see the C in front of mine!
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    edited March 2
    Seems like every time we had a kid we had settled on a name, only to have the wife change the name as she was going into labor. All the names of our kids are Irish in background.

    BTW, if you want to know more about your name's etymology and the frequency of use worldwide, go to Behind the Name,

    And I have just double-checked my name. Note from maker of wheels, but maker of wagons. I learned something new today. And the funny thing is, a friend and I did rebuild a wagon a few years ago. It was a Studebaker wagon built in the 1870s, much like "]this one.
  • I was given the diminutive form of my mother's name as my first name. It caused all kinds of confusion when in school or filling out legal papers, as people thought it was a nickname. An example would be if I were named Betty and everyone would question if my real name was not Elizabeth? My second name is after my Mother's sister. I liked my aunt very much and enjoyed having her name. As it turns out my second name and maiden name linked together also make a girl's name. So now I sign my name First name, Second and maiden written as one word, and the last name of my husband.
  • My parents called me by a name they heard on the radio.
    I was born towards the end of the war, and at that time there were radio programmes broadcasting greetings to American soldiers stationed in the UK from their loved ones 'back home'
    I don't know if any other names had been considered, but when they heard the message that ended "and Sharon sends her love", they fell for the name and that was the decision made. They had no idea who or what this Sharon was, and I used to say that I was probably named after someone's dog!

    As a child I loved my unusual name, there were no other Sharons in my school and I was thrilled to find it in the bible. I was 23 before I came across someone who shared my name.
    I was less thrilled when it suddenly became popular, not to say common, in the seventies, when the name was heard shouted across supermarkets and playgrounds all over the country - well, certainly all over Essex, where I lived at that time.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    It's interesting how differently people feel about the popularity of their names. I HATED having an unusual name, hated never finding any cute things with my name on them, hated having a name no-one else had. As a result I gave my children two of the most common names I could possibly think of. It was a great surprise to me to learn that some people like having an unusual name. My greatest desire in the 1970s was to be named Kim or Linda or Karen or Sherry, or any one of the names that we were always guaranteed to have at least two of in every class in school.
  • Sarasa wrote: »
    I have a name that can't be shorted, and I always wished I'd had a name like Elizabeth where you can chose loads of different short names.

    That's precisely why I named a little girl in our church with that name--her mother insisted I pick an "American" name for her, and I wanted to give her maximum flexibility. Though I felt a bit guilty when I met her again at age 14 and discovered the family was using the full name at length, every single time...

  • MarsupialMarsupial Shipmate
    My first name is a very Scottish-sounding name suggested by my Irish Catholic grandmother which my parents happened to like. My last name comes from my very Protestant grandfather’s almost-Scot Newcastle ancestry. (Improbably, on the same side of the family.) The upshot is that I could never go to Scotland without developing a severe case of imposter syndrome.
  • I was given the diminutive form of my mother's name as my first name. It caused all kinds of confusion when in school or filling out legal papers, as people thought it was a nickname. An example would be if I were named Betty and everyone would question if my real name was not Elizabeth? My second name is after my Mother's sister. I liked my aunt very much and enjoyed having her name. As it turns out my second name and maiden name linked together also make a girl's name. So now I sign my name First name, Second and maiden written as one word, and the last name of my husband.

    My grandfather was called Frank. For years, I assumed that his given name was Francis, but having done a lot of research through Ancestry, I've found that every official document calls him Frank. I don't have a birth certificate, unfortunately, but I have military records from his time in the Boer War and from his time in the Canadian Expeditionary Force in WW1. And I have a copy of his Canadian wedding certificate.

    The other strange thing is that all his siblings had middle names (and often that's what they were known as, so that Alfred Walter was always known as Wally and Bernard Reginald was known as Reggie) but Frank only ever seems to have had one name.
  • Marsupial wrote: »
    My first name is a very Scottish-sounding name suggested by my Irish Catholic grandmother which my parents happened to like. My last name comes from my very Protestant grandfather’s almost-Scot Newcastle ancestry. (Improbably, on the same side of the family.) The upshot is that I could never go to Scotland without developing a severe case of imposter syndrome.

    :lol:

    Reminds me of my real life name, which a visiting Norwegian Lutheran delegation seized upon gladly, in the mistaken belief that they had found a compatriot who had immigrated (most improbably) to St. Louis. Introductions were a little strained once they realized.
  • I've heard two different stories of how I got my first name. One is for the main character in a Jane Austen novel my mother was reading while pregnant and the other for a great great great great aunt (admittedly one with her own wikipedia article). I suspect the truth is the first but they then went looking for a relative (though the family does know several cousins descended from the g+ aunt). My middle name is probably for my great grandmother who died very shortly before I was born.
  • questioningquestioning Shipmate
    I'm named for my maternal grandmother. I'm very proud to be her namesake. She was a brave, spunky woman. From time to time, my parents hint that I have made (or am making) major life transitions when I'm too old to make them. Whenever that happens, I remind myself that my grandmother was x years older than I when she did a comparable thing :smile:

    My parents came from a tradition where children were named according to an algorithm that connected children's names to relatives.

    eldest daughter: named after maternal grandmother
    2nd daughter: named after paternal grandmother
    3rd daughter: named after eldest sister of mother
    4th daughter: named after eldest sister of father
    ...and so on through the women of the family, descending through the parents' sisters.

    eldest son: named after paternal grandfather
    2nd son: named after maternal grandfather
    3rd son: named after eldest brother of father
    4th son: named after eldest brother of mother
    ... and so on through the men of the family, descending thorough the parents' brothers.

    I have 2 sisters and one brother. I could tell you what my next 5 (imaginary) sisters would have been named and what two more brothers would have been called. At that point, we would have run out of grandparents, aunts and uncles, and I don't know how the algorithm would have dealt with that.
  • cgichardcgichard Shipmate
    I was named after a ship in a bottle, which my parents had aquired some time previously, and only when I was on the way did they notice that the ship had a tiny pennant bearing my name.

    I was always intended to be called by that name, but was given my mother's name Mary as my first name because the names sounded better (less staccato) that way round. In fact the same was true of my mother's names: her family always called her Elsie and my father and everyone else always called her Mary.

    But having an official first name that differs from my usual name has been a right nuisance, on exam certificates and airline documents etc. so I did eventually drop "Mary" after my mother's death, so now have only my real (ship in a bottle) name.
  • My first name is from an elderly farmer near Cupar, in Fife, who my father knew - no relation - who gave my grandparents a cottage after they had been bombed out of Greenock in 1941. My second name is the masculine of the name of a lovely great aunt - a Londoner - on whose birthday I was born, and my third given name is my father's first name. They are all saints' names too, but apart from the patron saint connection, I don't celebrate them. If they had followed Scottish tradition I would likely have been called John and am perfectly happy with what I got.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    My confirmation name: Supposed to be that of a saint. A man who lived across the street from us had just died. I was sure he had gone to heaven, and so I chose his name as my confirmation name.
    I can’t tell you how much I like this! :smiley:

    Yes, indeed.

    I have one name from each of my grandfathers, both still very much alive when I was born.
  • orfeoorfeo Shipmate
    I was deliberately not named after anyone.

    My father wasn't keen on the names he inherited from somewhere in the family tree, so the policy for my generation was that we have names that didn't belong to anyone.
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    edited March 3
    My children were given names that we both liked, one a biblical selection, the other my mother-in-law's name in masculine form, my father's first name and my mother's maiden name.

    Having twins means you have not only to think of more names but how they will go together - I know of a set who ended up with William and Benedict, promptly shortened to Bill and Ben, and known throughout their schooldays as Flowerpot #1 and #2 😖
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