Does the BVM take precedence over Lenten array?

Lincoln ImpLincoln Imp Shipmate Posts: 6
We have a full Requiem Mass tomorrow for a very free-spirited lady on the Feast of the Annunciation. The church is dressed in Lenten purple with all the statues etc covered. Altar frontal, vestments and hangings all a different shades of purple (we used to have white gauze for the coverings before). Does the BVM take precedence over Lenten hangings?

Comments

  • Fawkes CatFawkes Cat Shipmate
    What's the one about fools rushing in? Here comes a fool:

    Being pragmatic, it's a requiem mass. Presumably the lady being celebrated/commemorated/whatever left family or friends behind. What will give them the most comfort and support? Do that.
  • Or, to put it another way, what's the colour you usually employ for Requiems?

    Or again, do you have some nice Marian blue vestments?
    :innocent:
  • DavidDavid Shipmate
    Gold or white for the principal service would be usual in Lent on Lady Day. If you've covered anything, you wouldn't uncover it.

    Presumably the requiem isn't going to be the principal service, so do what you would usually do for a requiem, and don't uncover anything already covered.
  • David wrote: »
    Gold or white for the principal service would be usual in Lent on Lady Day. If you've covered anything, you wouldn't uncover it.

    Presumably the requiem isn't going to be the principal service, so do what you would usually do for a requiem, and don't uncover anything already covered.

    Yes, that's the best suggestion. No need to uncover anything.

    /tangent/

    My reference to Marian vestments was a bit naughty - though we do have a full High Mass set in azure blue! I expect FatherInCharge will wear one of our two other Marian chasubles tomorrow (there are two services) - one of the two is a pale blue, the other is cream with blue fleur-de-lys embroidery.
  • DavidDavid Shipmate
    @Bishops Finger Very nice!
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    edited March 24
    I'd go for Marian blue.

    Yes, in answer to you OP Lady Day is a major feast and takes precedence over Lent.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Yes, in answer to you OP Lady Day is a major feast and takes precedence over Lent.
    Unless it falls during Holy Week or Easter Week, in which case it’s transferred to the second week of Easter, at least in the Latin Rite. Of course, that’s not at play this year.

    In my tribe, a funeral liturgy, formally termed a “Service of Witness to the Resurrection,” is an Easter service, for which white is the proper color, even in Advent or Lent. I realize that neither the white nor the overriding of seasonal colors would be the case in some other traditions.

    But question: Is Lady Day—the Annunciation of the Lord—properly a Marian feast, a feast of Christ (whose Incarnation is announced), or a mix of the two?

  • DavidDavid Shipmate
    I also like Easter funerals, and am not a fan of full on requiems; I'd much rather see an Easter(-ish) Mass, in white, or a joyful non-eucharistic celebration.

    Good question about Lady Day. I'd tend to a feast of Christ.
  • CyprianCyprian Shipmate
    I'm so glad we moved the Annunciation back to Advent. These rubrical contortions would have been too much for me to bear.
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    Our requiems are white no matter what the season. They have been white during this lent too.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited March 25
    David wrote: »
    Good question about Lady Day. I'd tend to a feast of Christ.
    As would I. But I checked the Catholic Encyclopedia and found this:
    In the Orient, where the part which Mary took in the Redemption is celebrated by a special feast, 26 December, the Annunciation is a feast of Christ; in the Latin Church, it is a feast of Mary.
    The Wiki says:
    The Feast of the Annunciation is observed almost universally throughout Christianity, especially within Orthodoxy, Anglicanism, Catholicism, and Lutheranism. It is a major Marian feast, classified as a solemnity in the Catholic Church, a Festival in the Lutheran Churches, and a Principal Feast in the Anglican Communion. In Orthodox Christianity, because it announces the incarnation of Christ, it is counted as one of the 8 great feasts of the Lord, and not among the 4 great Marian feasts, although some prominent aspects of its liturgical observance are Marian.
    So take your pick?

  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    But my take on the Annunciation is that it is very much a feast of our Lord since it is the start of the Incarnation. For me the Marian feasts are Assumption, Immaculate Conception and the various commemorations of apparitions, none of which would see me crossing the threshold of a church to celebrate.
    Well maybe the Assumption as a fore-runner of our own resurrections.
  • ForthviewForthview Shipmate
    Until about 50 years ago the Annunciation, in the Roman rite ,was a Marian Feast day, still called by some Lady Day.
    Since the changes it has been entitled the Annunciation of the Lord.
  • DavidDavid Shipmate
    Yes, in reality, it's a bit of both. The Church of England deals with this nicely by giving the feast the official name of: "The Annunciation of Our Lord to the Blessed Virgin Mary".

    A typical Anglican fudge!
  • Lincoln ImpLincoln Imp Shipmate Posts: 6
    Thank you everyone. We are going white!
  • DavidDavid Shipmate
    Good choice!
  • David wrote: »
    Yes, in reality, it's a bit of both. The Church of England deals with this nicely by giving the feast the official name of: "The Annunciation of Our Lord to the Blessed Virgin Mary".

    A typical Anglican fudge!

    O come now! The official title does what it says on the tin, so to speak...
    :wink:
    Thank you everyone. We are going white!

    White is good - OK for Our Lady, and also a reminder of Easter and resurrection...

  • teddybearteddybear Shipmate Posts: 20
    Formerly, in the Roman Church it was considered a Marian feast, however, after the reform of the calendar following the Second Vatican Council, it has been considered a feast of the Lord.
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