Is it my imagination, just a local thing, or.

KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
edited March 28 in Ecclesiantics
...is the UK church entirely divided between worship bands, hands in the air, painfully conservative theology and ex tempore contributions on the one hand, and formal liturgy on the other? And sometimes both at the same place at different times?

Lock-down's hardly the time to be looking for somewhere, but needs must with our existing place going west. There seems to be a feeling that if you put on Hymns Ancient and Prehistoric at 10 and lots of noise at 11.15 you've covered all bases.

We're turned off by the former and run screaming from the latter :(

/whinge

Question is - how might an alternative to these extremes look? Or is it just us who feel equally alienated in both camps?
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Comments

  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    Aff Caff?
  • ArethosemyfeetArethosemyfeet Shipmate
    edited March 28
    Depends what you mean by "formal liturgy". The Kirk is still largely in hymn sandwich territory from what I've seen, neither particularly liturgical nor particularly ex tempore praise-band fundigelical either. Generally it's well-prepared, wordy and a bit (ok, quite often a lot) dull. I'd rather have the formal liturgy, myself.
    Edit: I should say you're more likely to find the extremes in larger towns and cities where they can gather enough support. More rural areas are more likely to be in the muddy and/or muddled middle.
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    Not us guv.
    We're stuck in a 1970s polite guitar based music, liturgy by the book time warp. Pretty typical urban RC in the UK.
    The extremes mentioned have their place, by I have no place in them.
  • Sojourner wrote: »
    Aff Caff?

    If you mean Affirming Catholicism that's pretty formal.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited March 28
    Sojourner wrote: »
    Aff Caff?

    If you mean Affirming Catholicism that's pretty formal.

    Yup.

    We're suburban semi rural but the churches still try to do one or the other - just not necessarily very well.

    Methodists are getting a go this morning on Zoom. Last methodist church I went to had a two maxima age range distribution peaking at around 7 and 65. I gather the local tradition was kids went to Sunday School with grandparents while parents had a lie in.

    My liturgy (which includes most hymn prayer sandwich offerings) tolerance is higher than herself's. A main thing both of us want to avoid is dullness. I know a lot of Eccles. denizens can't imagine how liturgy can be dull but outside their protected environment it's not an entirely new impression.
  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    That’s a bit sad
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Sojourner wrote: »
    That’s a bit sad

    Can you expand? I don't think you were helped by my editing during your posting so sorry about that.
  • Karl, locally it's been the same thing for ages, formal services 3 Sundays out of 4, with what would be a loud service if only they could on the 4th - no organ, just a orchestral "band" or piano and what is sung is choruses, mostly unknown by all but a very few who request them.*

    There is much insistence from a small faction to drive people into the 4th service, including much pressure recently on all the Rainbow, Brownies and Guiding groups because affiliated groups have to attend monthly, don't they? But the group I'm with is not affiliated and I avoided that service like the plague when I did attend the church. I suspect that the ongoing pressure is that the attendance at that service remains at half that of a formal service. Those who like it would love to drive all services that direction.

    I am not sure what further inroads there've been: I was horrified to see a screen and projected service obscuring the altar and chancel last time I was dragged in for a parade service. Fortunately, none of our Guides attended, so I quietly disappeared again.

    * One was Brian Doerkson's Purify My Heart/Refiner's Gold (YouTube link) which was a disaster as everyone got lost in the chorus with the long notes on "be holy". I pointed this out to the organist and choir leader asking if he could get someone to demonstrate and teach the congregation. He asked me to do it, and when I wouldn't, took it off the list to be sung. (I am not a good singer and being made to sing in public is not something I enjoy.)
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited March 28
    /tangent that song is exactly the sort of reason I can't abide worship songs (that and massive baggage)

    "My heart's one desire is to be holy"

    List of some of my heart's other desires:

    *Getting back to the Lake District
    *Being able to drink in pubs again
    *Finishing my model railway
    *Finishing my tabletop RPG
    *Retiring
    *Cheese

    I'm not sure figuring out where in that list "Being Holy" would rank would be edifying. As for it being the one desire?

    And I don't believe it's true of the guy who wrote it either. Pious clichés set to music.
  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    Sojourner wrote: »
    That’s a bit sad
    .

    OK fine

    Aff Caff ( as I understand it as a Sydney Oz RC who was involved for years in a seriously AC shack in a tub-thumping evo Anglican diocese) perceive Aff Caff establishments ( a few locally and a lot more elswhere is Oz) signifies catholic liturgy and sacramentalismn vs OTT Anglo-Papalism. Seems strange to hear from you & atmf that this is “formal”

    I’d have thought as formal as a low mass ( with songs or not) in both my tradition or in the Anglican communion

    If too formal for you then that is bloody sad


  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited March 28
    Means bells, smells and much spikiness over here. Couldn't slide a fag paper between Aff Cath and Fundies in Frocks formalitywise in my experience.
  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    That’s A-C here.

    Having said that A-C churches in Oz were traditionally and remain “mission churches”’often in once insalubrious parts of town and despite liturgical “spikiness”’are one helluva more welcoming than ( at least in Sinny) the bastions of Bible-believing Xtianity

    I speak as a refugee from the neocon RC model as espoused by ++ George quondam Syneiensis ( now back in Rome and may he never return)

  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited March 28
    Our Aff Cath are basically A-C who don't think girls have cooties. The ones who do are the Forward in Faith (aka Fundies in Frocks or Backwards in Bigotry) lot.
  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    Oh yes, them

    Not a strong presence in Sinny I understand and most of the Melburnian species have swum the Tiber not that the Irish/ Eyetalian Romans there would give a rat’s
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    When you feel cut off by language ......
    Is there a pocket dictionary available?
  • Sojourner wrote: »
    Sojourner wrote: »
    That’s a bit sad
    .

    OK fine

    Aff Caff ( as I understand it as a Sydney Oz RC who was involved for years in a seriously AC shack in a tub-thumping evo Anglican diocese) perceive Aff Caff establishments ( a few locally and a lot more elswhere is Oz) signifies catholic liturgy and sacramentalismn vs OTT Anglo-Papalism. Seems strange to hear from you & atmf that this is “formal”

    I’d have thought as formal as a low mass ( with songs or not) in both my tradition or in the Anglican communion

    If too formal for you then that is bloody sad


    I don't see formal as pejorative, I simply meant "by the[/a] book" rather than custom alone. Much of the SEC is Affirming Catholic and is very much in keeping with my own tastes (the 4 hour ferry journey means regular attendance is tricky but online has been a lifeline; the liturgy is still formal even when it comes from the Bishop's kitchen).
  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    Alan29 wrote: »
    When you feel cut off by language ......
    Is there a pocket dictionary available?

    Not required

  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    Sojourner wrote: »
    Sojourner wrote: »
    That’s a bit sad
    .

    OK fine

    Aff Caff ( as I understand it as a Sydney Oz RC who was involved for years in a seriously AC shack in a tub-thumping evo Anglican diocese) perceive Aff Caff establishments ( a few locally and a lot more elswhere is Oz) signifies catholic liturgy and sacramentalismn vs OTT Anglo-Papalism. Seems strange to hear from you & atmf that this is “formal”

    I’d have thought as formal as a low mass ( with songs or not) in both my tradition or in the Anglican communion

    If too formal for you then that is bloody sad


    I don't see formal as pejorative, I simply meant "by the[/a] book" rather than custom alone. Much of the SEC is Affirming Catholic and is very much in keeping with my own tastes (the 4 hour ferry journey means regular attendance is tricky but online has been a lifeline; the liturgy is still formal even when it comes from the Bishop's kitchen).

    Formally informal as I see it

  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    Alan29 wrote: »
    When you feel cut off by language ......
    Is there a pocket dictionary available?

    Seconded.

    I speak as a LibCaff.
  • AmosAmos Shipmate
    Karl, can you describe the service where you and your family would feel at home?
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Amos wrote: »
    Karl, can you describe the service where you and your family would feel at home?

    Sermon short and thought provoking. Music we're not too fussed but loud praise bands are out because of sensory issues and baggage from my charismatic days.

    Structured but not stuffy. By way of example I can't abide ex tempore prayer but much prefer a prepared intercession based on a fixed structure to just reading a fixed litany.

    It's funny you should ask this. The whole reason the issue has blown up is that our own congregation is fast becoming and may have already become unsustainable. As a result we started looking around and tuned into the local Methodists' Zoom service. It was a valuable experience because it reminded us how out of place we can feel. 35 minute sermon saying very little (and that high on vague piety and low on practical application). Given that the rest of our congregational remant aren't willing yet to throw in the towel we are planning to have our next Zoom meeting be the start of a revisioning of our service offering. So it's a very pertinent question.

    It must seem like we're terribly precious - why is what's out there not good enough, eh? How does everyone else cope? But I'm not sure that they do. Churches are haemorrhaging people so there must be itches they are not scratching. Are their itches our itches? Can we scratch them? Who knows?
  • SpikeSpike Admin Emeritus
    It’s strange how worship style and/or music equates to the theology a particular church follows. At the liberal catholic place where I grew up we had a man in the choir who was a very talented musician with a wonderful baritone voice. He felt somewhat out of place because, at heart, he was evangelical but didn’t attend an evangelical church because he didn’t like the music
  • angloidangloid Shipmate
    edited March 28
    Sounds like you'd be OK with one or other of the churches between which I oscillate, depending on how sacramental your spirituality is. Church A has a good community feel, is open to political, social and theological challenge, enjoys informal but well-planned worship, avoids most of the banal 'Jesus is my boyfriend' choruses and is strong on socially committed John Bell type hymns, BUT rarely celebrates the Eucharist and many people don't appear to have a sacramental bone in their body. Church B has had less time to bond as a community (the congregation was moribund until recently invigorated with new blood, but then Covid took over), but has a definitely anglo-catholic liturgical tradition, without the slightest prissiness. Formally informal to quote Sojourner above. The Eucharist as you would expect is central. Very inclusive social attitudes (we have a transgender curate) and the local multi-ethnic community is reasonably well represented in the congregation.

    My ideal church would be a combination of the two, but if I had to choose it would definitely be B.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Spike wrote: »
    It’s strange how worship style and/or music equates to the theology a particular church follows. At the liberal catholic place where I grew up we had a man in the choir who was a very talented musician with a wonderful baritone voice. He felt somewhat out of place because, at heart, he was evangelical but didn’t attend an evangelical church because he didn’t like the music

    The lyrics of much of the worship material used in evangelical churches is intrinsically evangelical; no-one is writing liberal choruses. Where a piece does cross the floor it's because someone has managed to radically reinterpret the lyrics - Be still for the presence of the Lord used as a communion hymn is a case in point.
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Spike wrote: »
    It’s strange how worship style and/or music equates to the theology a particular church follows. At the liberal catholic place where I grew up we had a man in the choir who was a very talented musician with a wonderful baritone voice. He felt somewhat out of place because, at heart, he was evangelical but didn’t attend an evangelical church because he didn’t like the music

    The lyrics of much of the worship material used in evangelical churches is intrinsically evangelical; no-one is writing liberal choruses. Where a piece does cross the floor it's because someone has managed to radically reinterpret the lyrics - Be still for the presence of the Lord used as a communion hymn is a case in point.

    Could you unpick that a bit. My RC parish uses that hymn at communion sometimes.
  • Alan29 wrote: »
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Spike wrote: »
    It’s strange how worship style and/or music equates to the theology a particular church follows. At the liberal catholic place where I grew up we had a man in the choir who was a very talented musician with a wonderful baritone voice. He felt somewhat out of place because, at heart, he was evangelical but didn’t attend an evangelical church because he didn’t like the music

    The lyrics of much of the worship material used in evangelical churches is intrinsically evangelical; no-one is writing liberal choruses. Where a piece does cross the floor it's because someone has managed to radically reinterpret the lyrics - Be still for the presence of the Lord used as a communion hymn is a case in point.

    Could you unpick that a bit. My RC parish uses that hymn at communion sometimes.

    It works well as a communion hymn for those of us who believe in the Real Presence. If the author was evangelical it's unlikely they would share that take on it.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Charismatic churches, at least those I was at in the late 80s, used this song during "ministry times" - having invoked warm fuzzy feelings in the congregation, people would feel led (often in response to messages spoken in tongues, "words of knowledge" and so on) to come forward for prayer, generally involving a lot more speaking in tongues, laying on of hands, commanding demons to leave and so on. The theology underlying this - that the Holy Spirit is healing people, casting out Satan and so on, is what the lyrics were referring too.

    It was not used at communion. I only experienced that use where the song had escaped its original environment and the words re-analysed to be about the presence of God in the Eucharist.

  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Charismatic churches, at least those I was at in the late 80s, used this song during "ministry times" - having invoked warm fuzzy feelings in the congregation, people would feel led (often in response to messages spoken in tongues, "words of knowledge" and so on) to come forward for prayer, generally involving a lot more speaking in tongues, laying on of hands, commanding demons to leave and so on. The theology underlying this - that the Holy Spirit is healing people, casting out Satan and so on, is what the lyrics were referring too.

    It was not used at communion. I only experienced that use where the song had escaped its original environment and the words re-analysed to be about the presence of God in the Eucharist.

    Thanks. We also use it at confirmations and at Masses that include the sacrament of the sick.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Alan29 wrote: »
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Spike wrote: »
    It’s strange how worship style and/or music equates to the theology a particular church follows. At the liberal catholic place where I grew up we had a man in the choir who was a very talented musician with a wonderful baritone voice. He felt somewhat out of place because, at heart, he was evangelical but didn’t attend an evangelical church because he didn’t like the music

    The lyrics of much of the worship material used in evangelical churches is intrinsically evangelical; no-one is writing liberal choruses. Where a piece does cross the floor it's because someone has managed to radically reinterpret the lyrics - Be still for the presence of the Lord used as a communion hymn is a case in point.

    Could you unpick that a bit. My RC parish uses that hymn at communion sometimes.

    It works well as a communion hymn for those of us who believe in the Real Presence. If the author was evangelical it's unlikely they would share that take on it.

    That's certainly how I'd understood your post. Not sure about it as a hymn to be sung during communion - I'd say it's much too bouncy and not meditative enough, despite its good theology.
  • PDRPDR Shipmate
    My recent visits to the UK have brought me to the uncomfortable conclusion that I probably would have ceased attending church above about 4 times a year if I was still back home. It seems to be either New-whatever Evangelicalism, or Liberal Catholicism, and both leave me colder than last week's lasagna in the bottom of the fridge. There are a couple of possibilities close to where I am from, but both have serious problems.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Alan29 wrote: »
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Spike wrote: »
    It’s strange how worship style and/or music equates to the theology a particular church follows. At the liberal catholic place where I grew up we had a man in the choir who was a very talented musician with a wonderful baritone voice. He felt somewhat out of place because, at heart, he was evangelical but didn’t attend an evangelical church because he didn’t like the music

    The lyrics of much of the worship material used in evangelical churches is intrinsically evangelical; no-one is writing liberal choruses. Where a piece does cross the floor it's because someone has managed to radically reinterpret the lyrics - Be still for the presence of the Lord used as a communion hymn is a case in point.

    Could you unpick that a bit. My RC parish uses that hymn at communion sometimes.

    It works well as a communion hymn for those of us who believe in the Real Presence. If the author was evangelical it's unlikely they would share that take on it.

    That's certainly how I'd understood your post. Not sure about it as a hymn to be sung during communion - I'd say it's much too bouncy and not meditative enough, despite its good theology.

    Bouncy?! I think you must be singing it very differently to me. :confused:
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Gee D wrote: »
    Alan29 wrote: »
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Spike wrote: »
    It’s strange how worship style and/or music equates to the theology a particular church follows. At the liberal catholic place where I grew up we had a man in the choir who was a very talented musician with a wonderful baritone voice. He felt somewhat out of place because, at heart, he was evangelical but didn’t attend an evangelical church because he didn’t like the music

    The lyrics of much of the worship material used in evangelical churches is intrinsically evangelical; no-one is writing liberal choruses. Where a piece does cross the floor it's because someone has managed to radically reinterpret the lyrics - Be still for the presence of the Lord used as a communion hymn is a case in point.

    Could you unpick that a bit. My RC parish uses that hymn at communion sometimes.

    It works well as a communion hymn for those of us who believe in the Real Presence. If the author was evangelical it's unlikely they would share that take on it.

    That's certainly how I'd understood your post. Not sure about it as a hymn to be sung during communion - I'd say it's much too bouncy and not meditative enough, despite its good theology.

    Bouncy?! I think you must be singing it very differently to me. :confused:

    Or by comparison with other pieces in the repertoire...
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    Gee D wrote: »
    Alan29 wrote: »
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Spike wrote: »
    It’s strange how worship style and/or music equates to the theology a particular church follows. At the liberal catholic place where I grew up we had a man in the choir who was a very talented musician with a wonderful baritone voice. He felt somewhat out of place because, at heart, he was evangelical but didn’t attend an evangelical church because he didn’t like the music

    The lyrics of much of the worship material used in evangelical churches is intrinsically evangelical; no-one is writing liberal choruses. Where a piece does cross the floor it's because someone has managed to radically reinterpret the lyrics - Be still for the presence of the Lord used as a communion hymn is a case in point.

    Could you unpick that a bit. My RC parish uses that hymn at communion sometimes.

    It works well as a communion hymn for those of us who believe in the Real Presence. If the author was evangelical it's unlikely they would share that take on it.

    That's certainly how I'd understood your post. Not sure about it as a hymn to be sung during communion - I'd say it's much too bouncy and not meditative enough, despite its good theology.

    Bouncy?! I think you must be singing it very differently to me. :confused:

    That was my thought!
    Key words "Be still."
  • Ethne AlbaEthne Alba Shipmate
    There Was a craze some years back for singing this at a ridiculous pace.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Ethne Alba wrote: »
    There Was a craze some years back for singing this at a ridiculous pace.

    To get it over with?
  • Hmmm. We're somewhere in the middle I think. We have to use recorded music (no musicians) but that does allow us to cover a pretty wide range of genres. For instance yesterday we listened to a short piece of seasonal Victorian choral music and hummed along to both "Hosanna, hosanna" and "Ride on, ride on in majesty". We're not too good at really up-to-the-minute worship songs but quite like Iona stuff. Equally in worship we do use some liturgy and responses, but not all the time; plus poetic reflections sometimes. Sermons are about 20 minutes and I really do try to relate them to real-life events: for instance yesterday I made a very explicit link between Jesus' Palm Sunday procession and the folk around the world who have been protesting against the "powers that be" and injustice such as in Myanmar, Hong Kong or in BLM and women's protests. We do use a screen, not just for words but occasionally to show short video clips that illustrate or lead into the sermon (although we have to be careful about copyright). Please don't think I'm saying, "Look how good we are" - we're just a fairly small and ordinary church. But I think we have, at least to some extent, managed to bridge the gap between the two "worship poles" highlighted in the OP. YMMV of course.
  • Pseudo OrganistPseudo Organist Shipmate Posts: 34
    Gee D wrote: »
    Not sure about it as a hymn to be sung during communion - I'd say it's much too bouncy and not meditative enough, despite its good theology.

    We have always sung ‘Be still, for the presence of the Lord’ as a quiet meditative hymn and often during communion.

    It is a hymn that we regularly use at the beginning of the service of Benediction. We use quite a number of evangelical choruses of the Mission Praise and Songs of Fellowship type as quiet hymns of adoration during Benediction. We don’t use some of the worst ‘Jesus is my boyfriend’ type choruses but many of the better worship songs addressed to Jesus make wonderful meaningful hymns of adoration to Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. I often wonder what the writers of these worship songs would think of us using them in this way.'

    Incidentally we are not a church that would be considered as Liberal Catholic but very much of the Forward in Faith variety.
  • angloidangloid Shipmate

    Incidentally we are not a church that would be considered as Liberal Catholic but very much of the Forward in Faith variety.

    Oddly F in F churches are often more likely to go for populist* type songs than Aff Cath. Although theologically I am much more aligned to the latter, I often despair at the upper-middle-class unconscious snobbery that it often entails.

    *I don't mean this disparagingly, in this context anyway.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Amos wrote: »
    Karl, can you describe the service where you and your family would feel at home?

    Sermon short and thought provoking. Music we're not too fussed but loud praise bands are out because of sensory issues and baggage from my charismatic days.

    Structured but not stuffy. By way of example I can't abide ex tempore prayer but much prefer a prepared intercession based on a fixed structure to just reading a fixed litany.

    It's funny you should ask this. The whole reason the issue has blown up is that our own congregation is fast becoming and may have already become unsustainable. As a result we started looking around and tuned into the local Methodists' Zoom service. It was a valuable experience because it reminded us how out of place we can feel. 35 minute sermon saying very little (and that high on vague piety and low on practical application). Given that the rest of our congregational remant aren't willing yet to throw in the towel we are planning to have our next Zoom meeting be the start of a revisioning of our service offering. So it's a very pertinent question.

    It must seem like we're terribly precious - why is what's out there not good enough, eh? How does everyone else cope? But I'm not sure that they do. Churches are haemorrhaging people so there must be itches they are not scratching. Are their itches our itches? Can we scratch them? Who knows?

    This reminds me of one of those books for kids where it's divided into three parts and you can have a fireman in the top third, and the middle part can be a rugby player, and the feet can be a ballet dancer. Then you flip it around and get different configurations.
  • CathscatsCathscats Shipmate
    Actually, @KarlLB it sounds just like my churches. But we are a bit far from you, though I would be happy to send you the link to the online services.
  • edited March 30
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Amos wrote: »
    Karl, can you describe the service where you and your family would feel at home?

    Sermon short and thought provoking. Music we're not too fussed but loud praise bands are out because of sensory issues and baggage from my charismatic days.

    Structured but not stuffy. By way of example I can't abide ex tempore prayer but much prefer a prepared intercession based on a fixed structure to just reading a fixed litany.

    It's funny you should ask this. The whole reason the issue has blown up is that our own congregation is fast becoming and may have already become unsustainable. As a result we started looking around and tuned into the local Methodists' Zoom service. It was a valuable experience because it reminded us how out of place we can feel. 35 minute sermon saying very little (and that high on vague piety and low on practical application).

    I can imagine this in a Methodist church. It's worth saying that we only get 'our' minister twice a month (in normal times - Covid and tele-services have changed that a bit). At the moment our minister is great - thoughtful, gentle, big on the bible, experienced in life and pastorally sensitive / humorous - so the more she takes services, the better. For three of the previous incumbents (typical tenure 5 years) I didn't feel like that at all. It's just the way Wesley rolled...

    Not many Methodist churches have evening services these days in the UK. Those that do, sometimes offer something 'different' / contemplative / whatever. If you (pl) have experience of running such a thing, such a place might be a home for you (in a denomination where lay-led services are very very normal, and sometimes the norm), so long as someone was prepared to go through the lay-preacher accreditation so as to weed-out the furiously heterodox :smile:

    As for the bimodal age distribution, you know what they say about being the change you want to see...
  • EutychusEutychus Shipmate
    Do you speak French?

    Music is as unplugged as we can make it. We have gone through three outstanding jazz drummers who have all moved on. Current lineup features acoustic guitar(s), piano, drums, recorder, occasional bass, and sometimes gets concert-level violin and flute for good measure. Some musicians rotate between instruments, sometimes between hymns, and not infrequently arrive at 10.30 or after for a 10.30 start. We usually manage to agree on the key (and any key changes) by face mask-imposed telepathy. Repertoire is eclectic, and may include suggestions from the congregation. Last Sunday we had everything from the French version of "nearer still nearer, O God to thee" to Hillsong (whose lyrics are, believe it or not, not all Jesus is my boyfriend, and often improved in translation).

    Extempore prayer happens but less so with the constraints of livestreaming. You won't hear any tongues.

    Communion is weekly.

    Sermon is a maximum of 30 minutes, less if it's me.
  • edited March 31
    Eutychus wrote: »
    We have gone through three outstanding jazz drummers who have all moved on.

    If 'moved on' is the euphemism I suspect, let me guess: bizarre gardening accident; choked on vomit (but not his own vomit); spontaneous human combustion?

    Just really set our hearts on fire, Lord.

    Tell me I'm right :smile:
  • EutychusEutychus Shipmate
    One flounced, the other two moved away. Like this one, also with a keyboard collection to kill for...
  • If ever I'm in France, I'll bring my alto. I can do a pretty good Archie Shepp (which is like saying in paint, I can take off Jackson Pollock :smile:).
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Bouncy?! I think you must be singing it very differently to me. :confused:

    Can't tell you what the choir sings it too, but it's certainly not on the meditative side. The words are spot on for communion though.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Bouncy?! I think you must be singing it very differently to me. :confused:

    Can't tell you what the choir sings it too, but it's certainly not on the meditative side. The words are spot on for communion though.

    This is how I sing it:
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PmkarrW9RIcR-k-ygGyo_XJIv-hNqwGQ/view?usp=sharing
    (I didn't record this specially, we've had it a couple of times in church since we were banned from live singing so I have it on file)
  • I'd say that was just a little on the slow side, for me personally, but it's about the same pace that we use at Our Place.

    YMMV, of course. It could well be speeded up, but to what end? That would destroy the meditative wossname, IMHO.
  • Eutychus wrote: »
    We have gone through three outstanding jazz drummers who have all moved on.

    If 'moved on' is the euphemism I suspect, let me guess: bizarre gardening accident; choked on vomit (but not his own vomit); spontaneous human combustion?

    Just really set our hearts on fire, Lord.

    Tell me I'm right :smile:

    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

    I am having lovely visions of the gardening accident, complete with gloves in unlikely places.

    And what is it about all these fire images? I keep hearing "set me on fire" and thinking, "If you keep annoying me, you'll get your wish."
  • I'd say that was just a little on the slow side, for me personally, but it's about the same pace that we use at Our Place.

    YMMV, of course. It could well be speeded up, but to what end? That would destroy the meditative wossname, IMHO.

    Your wish is my command:
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Z8KYAEMGGl0Kq-nSOFWZbI_n31RsMs9j/view?usp=sharing
    (got to love Audacity) :D
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