Happy Easter

I had a nose around, and I couldn't find another thread for it. Well, it seems like a bit of a big deal, in a ITTWACW kind-of-way. So - Happy Easter, folks. Christ is Risen!

Comments

  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    A blessed and wonderful Easter to all who celebrate the Resurrection!
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    I listened to some of the Easter Day service on the radio this morning and the Archbishop of Canterbury was restating that "death is not the end." Not a new message but it struck me in a new way. May you all have a blessed day.
  • WandererWanderer Shipmate Posts: 41
    I also listened to the Archbishop (Easter eucharist from Canterbury cathedral was broadcast on BBC1) and thought his message was apposite and vivid for our current situation.
    A happy and blessed Easter to all who sail this Ship!
  • CathscatsCathscats Shipmate
    Happy Easter all. At my third service thenRC congregation who are currently sharing our building (they had horrid damage from burst pipes) had left a basket of Easter treats for us to share. So kind!
  • Happy Easter to the Ship and all who sail on her.
  • MarthaMartha Shipmate
    Happy Easter to you all!
  • PendragonPendragon Shipmate
    Happy Easter!
  • Raptor EyeRaptor Eye Shipmate
    Happy Easter everyone! Let’s hope we emerge from the tomb of the pandemic with new life!
  • MamacitaMamacita Shipmate
    Happy Easter one and all!
  • Alleluia! Christ is Risen!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Happy Easter, everyone! :)
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Happy Easter all!
  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    Happy Easter!
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    MaryLouise wrote: »
    A blessed and wonderful Easter to all who celebrate the Resurrection!

    Well it's still mid-Lent for us (literally; this is Mid-Lent Sunday), but

    Happy Easter to those who celebrate Christ's resurrection on this day! He is Risen!
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    Happy Easter to all!
    (Including the bees)
  • He is risen indeed!
  • snowflakesnowflake Shipmate Posts: 33
    Happy Easter, everyone!
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    Happy Easter, everyone! (Well, everyone except @mousethief and our other Orthodox siblings. We’ll get to you soon. :wink: )

    We had in-person church for the first time since March 2020 today. It was outdoors—the ventilation/filtration in our 1950s church is basic enough such that we won’t be having services in the church until we can be confident it can be done safely, so probably July at the earliest. And we had to have three services instead of our usual one and get permission to close the street in front of the church so that social distances could be maintained. But still, it was wonderful Easter foretaste.

  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    Happy Easter!
  • Happy Easter everyone.
  • bassobasso Shipmate
    Happy Easter!
  • ForthviewForthview Shipmate
    Happy Easter !
  • PendragonPendragon Shipmate
    Happy Easter to Orthodox shipmates.
  • cgichardcgichard Shipmate
    Thankyou, @Pendragon
    Christ is risen!
    Truly He is risen!
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    Thank you @Pendragon
    Indeed he is risen!
  • ThunderBunkThunderBunk Shipmate
    We have the code for the Greek alphabet but not the cyrillic.

    On ist'eno voskres, Allelui'a
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    A blessed Easter for Orthodox Shipmates!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited May 2
    Happy Easter indeed to our Orthodox friends!

    Genuine question: why is it celebrated at a different time? I know there's a fairly complex equation for calculating when it'll be in the Western calendar, but how do you work it out?
  • snowflakesnowflake Shipmate Posts: 33
    Not Orthodox, but I believe that at least some of the difference is attributed to the fact that they use the Julian calendar, as opposed to the Gregorian calendar used by the West.
  • cgichardcgichard Shipmate
    Part of the answer @Piglet is the canonical requirement for Orthodox Pascha not to coincide with the Jewish Passover. The actual calculation is above my paygrade, but I think it has to be the first Sunday after a full moon.
  • cgichardcgichard Shipmate
    edited May 2
    The weather was positively balmy here in Melbourne, with no wind. So not a single candle was blown out on Friday night during the Epitaphios (burial bier) procession, or Sunday midnight when we proclaim the Resurrection Gospel to the world outside the doors of the church.
    [Apologies for double post; I missed the edit window.]
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    A blessed Pascha to our Orthodox siblings!
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited May 2
    cgichard wrote: »
    Part of the answer @Piglet is the canonical requirement for Orthodox Pascha not to coincide with the Jewish Passover.
    Not really, not unless there’s an Eastern canon on the subject I’m not familiar with, which is quite possible. But that’s not what the First Council of Nicaea determined.

    Prior to that Council, different Christian communities determined the date of Easter/Pascha differently, with the result that the feast was celebrated on different dates in different places. Some had methods to calculate the date based on the equinox. Others—called “Quartodecimans,” (“14ers”)—based their calculation on when Passover, Nisan 14, fell. (Compare that to the current practice of Jehovah’s Witnesses of observing the Memorial of Christ’s death on Nisan 14.)

    The Council of Nicaea determined that there should be a common date throughout the church, and that that date should not rely on the Jewish calendar. So the rule was not so much that Easter/Pascha couldn’t coincide with Passover; rather, it was that the date should be determined independently of Passover or of the Jewish calendar. As a result, if the two did coincide, it was just that—coincidence.
    The actual calculation is above my paygrade, but I think it has to be the first Sunday after a full moon.
    Yes, the rule that developed after the First Council of Nicaea is that it’s the first Sunday after the full moon that follows the equinox, called the “Paschal full moon.” But in execution, it’s not quite that simple. Because the two determinants—the equinox and the full moon—can vary from place to place, March 21 was determined to be the equinox for this purpose, and a system of set lunar months was devised to determine the date of the Paschal full moon.

    When Western countries and churches adopted the Gregorian calendar, then March 21 in the West and March 21 in the East began to divurge. They’re now 13 (I think?) days apart. And that’s what leads to the potential difference in dates for Western and Eastern Christians. If the Paschal full moon from the Western perspective falls between March 21 on the Gregorian calendar and March 21 on the Julian calendar, East and West will celebrate the Resurrection on different days. If the Paschal full moon from the Western perspective falls after March 21 on the Julian calendar, East and West will celebrate the Resurrection on the same Sunday.

    There is an ecumenical (World Council of Churches) proposal for a common date that would replace the March 21 presumptive date for the equinox and the presumptive date for the full moon with the actual astronomical equinox and full moon as observed on the meridian of Jerusalem. Though many in a variety of traditions seemed to think this might be a good solution, it hadn’t been adopted by any church bodies.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Thanks for the explanations, folks - much appreciated!
  • questioningquestioning Shipmate
    Alleluia! Christ is risen!
  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    Happy Easter to the Orthodoxen shippies.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    Different abstruse calculation algorithm. And as @Nick Tamen said, we base it on the Julian calendar and not the Gregorian, so the "solstice" used in the calculations is actually 13 days after the real solstice. Some of us think that needs to change but (a) we're in the minority, and (b) nothing changes quickly in Orthodoxy.

    Thanks for all the good wishes, and Indeed He Is Risen!

    @ThunderBunk - the Old Church Slavonic as used in Russia is usually transliterated Voistinu Voskrese. Воистину воскресе!
  • ThunderBunkThunderBunk Shipmate
    edited May 3
    [quote="mousethief;c-416871

    @ThunderBunk - the Old Church Slavonic as used in Russia is usually transliterated Voistinu Voskrese. Воистину воскресе![/quote]

    Interesting. I'm sure I heard what I said when circumnavigating a church in Yaroslavl' mumblety mumble years ago. Or at least that's what I was saying. Perhaps I got it wrong. What I can say for certain is that the "e" on the end of "voskrese" was not being prounced: it was a short-form participal in modern Russian that I was hearing.
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    edited May 3
    mousethief - it's the equinox in March, not the solstice, which comes in June and December. But both will be off by quite a lot from what actually happens in the sky in the Julian calendar.

    Happy Easter, anyway.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    edited May 4
    Penny S wrote: »
    mousethief - it's the equinox in March, not the solstice, which comes in June and December. But both will be off by quite a lot from what actually happens in the sky in the Julian calendar.

    Happy Easter, anyway.

    Yeah, that. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Thank you.
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    For some to me unfathomable reason, when you go to an observatory, or plug in to a planetarium program such as Stellarium, Julian dates are made available. Astronomers still use them.
    Presumably to avoid hiccups when dealing with repetitive things like Halley's Comet which straddle the different dates upon which different peoples switched to Gregorian.
  • Penny S wrote: »
    For some to me unfathomable reason, when you go to an observatory, or plug in to a planetarium program such as Stellarium, Julian dates are made available. Astronomers still use them.
    Presumably to avoid hiccups when dealing with repetitive things like Halley's Comet which straddle the different dates upon which different peoples switched to Gregorian.

    What astronomers call the "Julian Date" is a continuous count of days since a fixed reference, in this case, 4713 BC. (This particular choice is a date that is before any known historical event (known by, I think, 16th century astronomer Joseph Scaliger) so there wouldn't be any negative dates, and occurs at the coincidence of several repetitive cycles, which is convenient.)

    At time of posting, the Julian date is 2459338.93125
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