2021 Olympics

OMG. I've just watched a British 1, 2 in the final of the men's 200m freestyle 😀
While all the attention was on Duncan Scott as fastest qualifier his teammate Tom Dean powered to the gold medal in 1:44:22, a winning margin of 0.0004.

The last time there was a British 1, 2 in an olympic pool was in 1908.
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Comments

  • I would just like to direct your attention to Barbra Banda, striker for the Zambia women's football team, who is kind of remarkable--two hat tricks in two matches against Netherlands and China (she deserves a better back line).
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Just for the record, these are technically still being called the 2020 Olympics.
  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    I watched a bit of the skateboarding last night and wondered if the commentator was actually speaking English! Amazing, especially when we were told that some of the competitors were only 13.
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    edited July 27
    The GB rugby sevens team made a hash of the first part of their latest match, being at one point down 21-0 to the USA. Pulled it back thanks to a lucky-timed sinbin for the US team and a bit of discipline.

    In the gymnasium the British women have just taken Bronze behind the Russians and Americans in the artistic gymnastics 👏
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    The British men (James Guy, Tom Dean, Matt Richards and Duncan Scott) have just won the 4x200m freestyle relay 🍾
  • TukaiTukai Shipmate
    That is something of a surprise to me, since the British climate is not exactly encouraging to swimming. Less surprising is that in the corresponding even for women, the Australians won , for the fourth Olympics in a row. IMO That Australian produces a disproportionate number of top-class swimmers is because almost everyone swims after a fashion in the hot summer, as it's a great way to cool off. To prevent too may people entering the water who can't swim, learn to swim is treated as a personal safety skill which kids have to learn , just like how to cross a road safely. So it's not surprising that a proportion of them treat it as a competitive activity.
  • TukaiTukai Shipmate
    At the last Olympics, Fiji won a gold medal in sevens rugby, which is close to being the national sport there. It was their first and only gold medal (so far) in any sport, and the government duly declared a public holiday to celebrate. But after their win this year, which I celebrate as an expatriate Fijian, there may not be a public holiday because of covid-19, which is rampant around Suva, the national capital.
  • Tukai wrote: »
    At the last Olympics, Fiji won a gold medal in sevens rugby, which is close to being the national sport there.

    Close to being a national religion from what I hear. Really pleased for them, they deserve it.

  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    Fantastic win for Fiji 🍾 🇫🇯🍾🇫🇯🍾🇫🇯
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Tukai wrote: »
    ... the British climate is not exactly encouraging to swimming ...
    We do have Swimming Pools ... :mrgreen:
  • And a requirement that all children should be taught to swim at least a length of a standard swimming pool unaided by the time they are 11 - it's been in several iterations of the National Curriculum for England and Wales.
  • TukaiTukai Shipmate
    I'm pleased to hear that water safety has improved since I was in primary school in England (which I was for a couple of years, XX decades ago)
  • Re Fiji. Watch the team singing on the podium. They're wonderful. https://twitter.com/luckytran/status/1420599664223657987?s=20
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    That's splendid - well done them!
  • What about that women's 100 metre final. Jamaica, Jamaica, Jamaica!
  • orfeoorfeo Suspended
    Swimmer Emma McKeon has now won 7 medals at this Olympics - equaling the women's record and only one behind the overall record - and 11 in total, the most of any Australian. Just amazing.
  • Discovered at the weekend that one of the BMX medalists is from the village I grew up in. I left long before they were born, but any excuse for the warm fuzzies.
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    The Canadian women knock off the US in the football semi-final 1-0. Sweet revenge for being robbed by a Norwegian referee at the 2012 games.
    https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/canada-u-s-soccer-ref-defended-by-father-1.1195499
  • It was a pretty controversial refereeing decision this time too. Canadian attacker charges into a US defender from behind, goes down and wins a penalty. I don't understand it.
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    The penalty was given after VAP review.
  • The Olympics can be a force for good in the most surprising ways.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    What an absolutely wonderful thing to do - good for them!
  • Karsten Warholm of Norway won the 400m hurdles in a world record time under 46 seconds.

    Nice of the lodger, who was on night watch, to wake me up to tell me at c04:30 😯

    Feeling very old not just because of sleep deprivation but because I can remember watching David Hemery setting a (then) similarly impressive time in Mexico in 1968 😬
  • orfeoorfeo Suspended
    The Olympics can be a force for good in the most surprising ways.

    Geoblocked.
  • The Olympics can be a force for good in the most surprising ways.

    Video unavailable.
  • Ok. Sorry about that.
    Details available here of a couple using the Olympics as a theme to raise money for research into MND/ALS.
  • I have really enjoyed watching the combined climbing. The scoring system seems ridiculous though!

    This morning I saw the riding round of the modern pentathlon. It seems extraordinary that the competitors have to ride unfamiliar horses! And this actually made a big difference: several (including the leader) were completely unable to get on with the horse and were eliminated or put out of contention because of this. Shouldn't you be allowed to "bring your own horse"?
  • HeavenlyannieHeavenlyannie Shipmate
    edited August 6
    It seems so unfair that they lose because of a clearly unhelpful horse.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Shouldn't you be allowed to "bring your own horse"?

    I don't know about where you are, but there are very strict rules here about bringing in animals/birds/live fish etc (and plant life also) without their going through an extended period of quarantine. I'd imagine similar laws in a batch of other such isolated places.
  • The event is supposed to replicate what is done in a battlefield, I believe. So, presumably jumping on a random horse is part of the skillset and you have to manage it.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Shouldn't you be allowed to "bring your own horse"?

    I don't know about where you are, but there are very strict rules here about bringing in animals/birds/live fish etc (and plant life also) without their going through an extended period of quarantine. I'd imagine similar laws in a batch of other such isolated places.

    Maybe, but the actual horseriding competitions for things like horse dancing (sorry, "dressage") involve horses flying in, so it must be at least possible?
  • The event is supposed to replicate what is done in a battlefield, I believe. So, presumably jumping on a random horse is part of the skillset and you have to manage it.

    That seems... too much. After all, they don't have to fence or shoot with random weapons or swim/run a random distance over random terrain...
  • It's reasonable to ask how interchangeable the set of horses are. Sure - people are probably randomly allocated to horses, so it's not biased, but if you have good horses and less good horses, then it would seem to introduce a significant random element into the competition.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Isn't it the case in some show-jumping competitions (not sure if it includes the Olympics) that in one of the elements the riders have to ride one another's horses?

    I assume the idea is to prove one's horsemanship.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    It's reasonable to ask how interchangeable the set of horses are. Sure - people are probably randomly allocated to horses, so it's not biased, but if you have good horses and less good horses, then it would seem to introduce a significant random element into the competition.

    So much so that it ceases to become an athletic competition and becomes a lottery.
  • The commentators said that all of the horses have run over the course, they are all capable of it. The point of it is that the athletes have to find a way to relate to any random horse. It is not the horse so much as the horse/rider combination.

    They said (and I have no idea) that the rider was failing to convey confidence to the horse.
  • LandlubberLandlubber Shipmate
    A BBC commentator also said that a rider has the opportunity to reject the horse allocated to them, but they are then given a reserve horse - and added that horses are on the reserve list “for a reason”, so the rider has to make their own decision.
  • In an interview with the British gold medallist in the Modern Pentathlon, Kate French she says that her route into the discipline via The Pony Club probably gave her the edge over yer competitors.

    ION the German coach has been expelled from the games after punching the horse that Annika Schleu couldn't get to grips with.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Gee D wrote: »
    Shouldn't you be allowed to "bring your own horse"?

    I don't know about where you are, but there are very strict rules here about bringing in animals/birds/live fish etc (and plant life also) without their going through an extended period of quarantine. I'd imagine similar laws in a batch of other such isolated places.

    Maybe, but the actual horseriding competitions for things like horse dancing (sorry, "dressage") involve horses flying in, so it must be at least possible?

    Japan may allow flying the horses in, but there would be great restriction on bringing them back, even without the covid restrictions.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Gee D wrote: »
    Shouldn't you be allowed to "bring your own horse"?

    I don't know about where you are, but there are very strict rules here about bringing in animals/birds/live fish etc (and plant life also) without their going through an extended period of quarantine. I'd imagine similar laws in a batch of other such isolated places.

    Maybe, but the actual horseriding competitions for things like horse dancing (sorry, "dressage") involve horses flying in, so it must be at least possible?

    Japan may allow flying the horses in, but there would be great restriction on bringing them back, even without the covid restrictions.

    A few days ago the BBC had a short segment showing a horse that had been flown out to the Olympics and had now flown back to the UK, disembarking into its "home paddock" as it were. So clearly it is possible to do the "own horse" thing for all other horse-riding events.

    I think they may change the rules after the horse-punching incident. The horses clearly crash into the fences more and are less happy in the modern pentathlon than in the normal showjumping. This does not seem nice for the horses or for the riders. They've changed other rules in the recent past so why not change this one?
  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    I didn’t watch the karate but I saw a clip of one of the classes where the competitor had to make the moves against an imaginary opponent, complete with suitable facial expressions 🤭- a bit like the Hakka, I suppose!
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate

    A few days ago the BBC had a short segment showing a horse that had been flown out to the Olympics and had now flown back to the UK, disembarking into its "home paddock" as it were. So clearly it is possible to do the "own horse" thing for all other horse-riding events.

    As my post made clear, I was referring to restrictions here. Other places may not have the same concerns.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Gee D wrote: »
    Shouldn't you be allowed to "bring your own horse"?

    I don't know about where you are, but there are very strict rules here about bringing in animals/birds/live fish etc (and plant life also) without their going through an extended period of quarantine. I'd imagine similar laws in a batch of other such isolated places.

    Maybe, but the actual horseriding competitions for things like horse dancing (sorry, "dressage") involve horses flying in, so it must be at least possible?

    Japan may allow flying the horses in, but there would be great restriction on bringing them back, even without the covid restrictions.

    The whole point about the riding element of the Modern Pentathlon is that you just get whatever horse is allocated to you and have 20 minutes to establish a rapport before you do the showjumping. Similarly the competitors don't use their own foils for the fencing or pistols for shooting.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    edited August 8
    Thanks. A good idea and a real test of the rider. Are there any other equestrian events? You can see how much attention we're giving the whole affair.
  • Sounds nasty for horses. They are treated like unfamiliar swords. Like sports equipment. This doesn't belong in the Olympics. https://horsesport.com/horse-news/modern-pentathlon-under-fire-after-ugly-scenes-riding-phase
    “The modern pentathlon at Tokyo 2020 Olympics which showcased the abuse of horses on live TV is out of step with the science on horse welfare and modern acceptance of horses in competition. The WBA requests that the equestrian element of the pentathlon is either removed or completely overhauled on equine welfare grounds.”

  • ISTM that something should be done. Using your own horses (someone pointed out) makes the bar for entry much higher. But giving the competitors a) much more time, several days, with some jumping) and b) a much wider selection of horses would make it much fairer on the horses.

    They did say that the horses can sleep on the plane, and they are quite OK with the trip. I have no idea is this is true, or what happens if there is turbulance.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Bringing live animals into Oz is very very difficult, but for good reason. We've managed to avoid all sorts of diseases through very strict importation rules - for example, rabies is unknown here, as basically only seeing eye dogs can be brought in without a very lengthy period of isolation.
  • Furtive GanderFurtive Gander Shipmate
    edited August 8
    Gee D wrote: »
    Gee D wrote: »
    Shouldn't you be allowed to "bring your own horse"?

    I don't know about where you are, but there are very strict rules here about bringing in animals/birds/live fish etc (and plant life also) without their going through an extended period of quarantine. I'd imagine similar laws in a batch of other such isolated places.

    Maybe, but the actual horseriding competitions for things like horse dancing (sorry, "dressage") involve horses flying in, so it must be at least possible?

    Japan may allow flying the horses in, but there would be great restriction on bringing them back, even without the covid restrictions.

    Stir fry with bamboo shoots, ginger and noodles?
  • A GB athlete, Joseph Choong won the the modern Pentathlon for men.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate

    Stir fry with bamboo shoots, ginger and noodles?

    If cooked, and then frozen in Japan, perhaps so. Probably a very small market though.
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