The end of an era?

We have always had our milk delivered in glass pint bottles. This morning, there was a note attached to say that our milkman was retiring and so our milk delivery would be coming to an end.
It might seem a silly thing, but it really feels like it’s the end of an era, and it’s a bit depressing - I feel very old.
Are there changes which have had the same effect on others on the Ship?
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Comments

  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    On-prem IT solutions. They seem to be going the same way and that makes me feel old because I remember when personal PCs were the new thing (rather than dumb terminals talking to mainframes) and it's like we're going back to that old era, with PCs acting pretty much as dumb terminals to apps running on server clouds rather than the mainframes of the 70s.

    That's probably a bit niche...
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    Priscilla wrote: »
    We have always had our milk delivered in glass pint bottles. This morning, there was a note attached to say that our milkman was retiring and so our milk delivery would be coming to an end.
    It might seem a silly thing, but it really feels like it’s the end of an era, and it’s a bit depressing - I feel very old.
    Are there changes which have had the same effect on others on the Ship?
    This happened to us too, then I discovered via Facebook and a personal contact that another dairyman was taking on deliveries in our area so we’ve gone to him now. It’s only twice a week which requires more planning and isn’t quite so convenient, but we’re glad still to be getting doorstep delivery.
  • ArielAriel Shipmate
    Someone came round a while ago from a dairy company and asked if anyone wanted to sign up for doorstep deliveries. It's proved quite popular. They're pretty much national. If you google Milk and More you'll be able to find out what their coverage is, but it does seem to cover an area from Dorset to Staffordshire.

    When my neighbours moved out last autumn they forgot to cancel, so I can confirm that their orange juice is pretty good. I was quite tempted to sign up myself.
  • We haven’t had doorstep milk delivery and egg where I am since the early 1970s.

  • We have not had milk delivery since the 60' yet with COVID it appears to have come back in some areas. Side note my dad delivered milk with horse and cart in Wash. D.C. He said the horse knew the route and would stop at the right house on her own.
  • HeavenlyannieHeavenlyannie Shipmate
    edited January 20
    We have had Milk and More/predecessor Dairy Crest deliveries here for about 20 years. They are part-owned by Muller these days. They deliver 3 times a week to us and also do things like eggs, cheese, bacon, as well as really expensive artisan stuff.
    ( my Dad worked in a Unigate dairy factory filling bottles in the 80s)
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    We have doorstep deliveries from a local(ish) dairy twice a week, which is quite enough for us.

    But I remember milk floats and the chinking crates. And free milk in primary school in the 1950s. In fact the whole postwar provision for healthier children (dear dead idealistic days) - there was powdered milk and concentrated orange juice and cod liver oil tablets and jars of sticky brown stuff that we took before bed.
  • The thing about milk floats was that there was a non-zero chance that you'd get up and discover that the milk was already off, or you'd discover that the blue tits had pecked their way through the lid to get at the cream.

  • We’ve never had birds peck the lids, possibly because they tend to be in the garden not on the drive and the milk is homogenised these days so no cream. But the going off thing can be an issue, we are lucky as our house is west facing so that helps, especially as our milk is often delivered at 2am. The milk was fine last year, though, despite the heat.
  • PuzzlerPuzzler Shipmate
    We had bottled deliveries during first lockdown, but I stopped them in the summer because of the sun problem. With A—i just across the road I fetch it twice a week now. Our “ end of an era” time came about ten years ago when our lovely farmer-milkman retired.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    We have had problems in warmer weather with milk going off with our twice a week deliveries. Things improved when we started putting a coolbag out with a couple of freezer blocks in it, and the delivery was put into the bag. Not needed at the moment as outside temperatures are colder than the fridge.
  • JLBJLB Shipmate Posts: 31
    Our local dairy stopped deliveries in the early noughties. We were able to buy their milk in some local shops, packaged in plastic. About two years ago they restarted deliveries. We now get twice weekly deliveries of their own organic milk, cream and butter (milk and yogurt in returnable glass containers) along with eggs, cheese, preserves from other local farms. And delivered by electric milk float, or electric vans to more distant villages. Ticks all the sustainability boxes, with all packaging returnable or compostable, but I do realise not everyone is so lucky.
  • ArielAriel Shipmate
    The birds discovered our milk bottles on the doorstep in the days when I was young and that was it, I was assigned to race to the front door and get them in before the birds could have a go at them or they had to be poured away. Light summer mornings were a problem. I usually did better in winter when the mornings were darker.
  • I recently had to buy a new printer, and it never occurred to me to check if it could print envelopes. It doesn't happen very often these days, but once in a while you need it. No. It can't and won't print them. There are probably tricks you can play on it, but it's an aggravation to have to do it. Oddly enough, the day following this discovery I had a message from Mozilla telling me that nobody needs printers any more; all you need is a good pdf converter and you'll never have to buy another inkjet cartridge. Steaming...
  • Going back to milk for a moment, does anyone remember having the cream at the top of the bottle on deserts (milk became homogenised). Also, in cold weather, I remember milk freezing in the bottle- the cap would be pushed off by the plume of ice.
  • DardaDarda Shipmate
    As a child, we had a little manual pump to siphon the cream off the top of the bottle, which was then used on desserts
  • BoogieBoogie Heaven Host
    Priscilla wrote: »
    Going back to milk for a moment, does anyone remember having the cream at the top of the bottle on deserts (milk became homogenised). Also, in cold weather, I remember milk freezing in the bottle- the cap would be pushed off by the plume of ice.

    And tops had to be put over the bottles to stop blue tits pecking holes in them.

    Our glass bottle delivery only stopped when we moved house. They don’t deliver here. 😢

  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    To this day - dear knows how many decades after homogenisation became universal - I still find myself shaking the milk carton.

    Also at some point electric kettles stopped being squat things with a plug point on the side and turned into tall jugs sitting on round base.
  • The birds are no longer interested in the bottle tops, but the foxes go for the once-a-week sliced loaf and half-a-dozen eggs that the milkman delivers, so we leave a large plastic box out for him to put over the lot.

    The end of an era in that regard was the change from electric milk floats to diesel trucks, which must have happened fifteen years ago. No doubt they will revert before long.
  • DardaDarda Shipmate
    Signaller wrote: »
    The end of an era in that regard was the change from electric milk floats to diesel trucks, which must have happened fifteen years ago. No doubt they will revert before long.

    Our morning milk deliveries do indeed come on an electric vehicle these days
  • Firenze wrote: »
    To this day - dear knows how many decades after homogenisation became universal - I still find myself shaking the milk carton.

    Also at some point electric kettles stopped being squat things with a plug point on the side and turned into tall jugs sitting on round base.

    There was an intermediate phase of "tall jugs with plug point". The "easy to connect, put it on at any angle" round base used to be a selling point...

    @Stercus Tauri I think the solution to envelopes is generally either a sheet of adhesive labels, or a window envelope.

  • @Stercus Tauri I think the solution to envelopes is generally either a sheet of adhesive labels, or a window envelope.
    You are probably right, but why on earth remove such a simple and useful feature? It was probably just a few lines of software in the printer driver. Mechanically it's no different from the old one. And anyway; I'm presbyterian - I liked the old one better.

  • @Stercus Tauri I think the solution to envelopes is generally either a sheet of adhesive labels, or a window envelope.
    You are probably right, but why on earth remove such a simple and useful feature? It was probably just a few lines of software in the printer driver. Mechanically it's no different from the old one. And anyway; I'm presbyterian - I liked the old one better.

    The most common reason would be "the printer company had a bunch of complaints about printer jams with envelopes, and it was cheaper to remove the envelope printing mode from the list of supported modes".

    Although it might be possible to persuade your printer to print on envelopes anyway - do you have the ability to configure a custom paper size?
  • SpikeSpike Admin Emeritus

    @Stercus Tauri I think the solution to envelopes is generally either a sheet of adhesive labels, or a window envelope.

    That’s all,we’ll and good of you want to print an entire sheet of labels, but if you only want one, it’s incredibly wasteful
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    When I use labels from a sheet I just put the address in the first space in the template where there’s a label still on the sheet. The Sam sheet will go through the printer on several occasions before the labels are all used.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Firenze wrote: »
    To this day - dear knows how many decades after homogenisation became universal - I still find myself shaking the milk carton.

    Also at some point electric kettles stopped being squat things with a plug point on the side and turned into tall jugs sitting on round base.

    Not sure that I totally understand your description, but we have electric kettles, are much the same shape as the sort of kettle used on a stovetop and metal, and electric jugs which are more jug shaped and ceramic. The kettles sit on a base which has the power connection, but the power goes straight into the jug.
  • The advantages of jug kettles are (i) they take up less space on the counter and (b) they're better if you only want to boil a little water. The "traditional" shaped ones do look nicer though!
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    We have a cylindrical (may be ever so slightly conical) electric jug, in stainless steel. It sits on a base, also in stainless steel, with a half dozen or so buttons from which you can select the temperature you want the water heated to.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Ours has one button - or rather, small lever - you press to start, whereupon it lights up. Which is another thing kettles didn't use to do. Can anyone remember if old electric kettles switched themselves off? Certainly non-electric ones just whistled or filled the place with steam.

    One of the sounds I always associate with visiting the grandparents, along with the ticking of the pendulum clock, and the hissing of the Tilley lamp, is the pumping sound of the big black kettle on the back of the range.
  • Old electric kettles definitely did not switch themselves off. In my student days I used to boil eggs in mine.
  • Spike wrote: »

    @Stercus Tauri I think the solution to envelopes is generally either a sheet of adhesive labels, or a window envelope.

    That’s all,we’ll and good of you want to print an entire sheet of labels, but if you only want one, it’s incredibly wasteful

    You can put the same sheet of labels through the printer more than once, as long as you're careful with the edges when you remove a label. I routinely print on half-used label sheets.

  • SpikeSpike Admin Emeritus
    edited January 23
    Cathscats wrote: »
    Old electric kettles definitely did not switch themselves off. In my student days I used to boil eggs in mine.

    I used to have a Kenyan flatmate who would make tea in one of them. He would put water, teabags, milk & sugar in the kettle and boil them all up together. Apparently, that’s how they did it in Kenya. It tasted disgusting.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I remember "kettle-shaped" electric kettles (as opposed to the tall jug-shaped ones) with the cable socket in the side, and a switch on the handle that I think switched itself off. No separate stand, so unless you unplugged it, you had to pour it within the range of the cable.

    @Spike, that does sound horrid - tea with boiled milk! Ugh!
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Cathscats wrote: »
    Old electric kettles definitely did not switch themselves off. In my student days I used to boil eggs in mine.

    I remember my mother reminiscing about digs she was in where you always got brown eggs. Then she discovered the landlady boiled them in the teapot. She, otoh, considered that anything that came out of a hen's bum should be cooked in a dedicated saucepan.

  • The advantages of jug kettles are (i) they take up less space on the counter and (b) they're better if you only want to boil a little water. The "traditional" shaped ones do look nicer though!
    The other advantage of a jug kettle with the connection to the base in the centre is that they spin round so that left-handed me and right-handed Sandemaniac can both pick it up with our dominant hand.
  • Exactly, re left-handed.
  • SpikeSpike Admin Emeritus
    The advantages of jug kettles are (i) they take up less space on the counter and (b) they're better if you only want to boil a little water. The "traditional" shaped ones do look nicer though!
    The other advantage of a jug kettle with the connection to the base in the centre is that they spin round so that left-handed me and right-handed Sandemaniac can both pick it up with our dominant hand.

    What, both at the same time? 😜
  • Spike wrote: »
    The advantages of jug kettles are (i) they take up less space on the counter and (b) they're better if you only want to boil a little water. The "traditional" shaped ones do look nicer though!
    The other advantage of a jug kettle with the connection to the base in the centre is that they spin round so that left-handed me and right-handed Sandemaniac can both pick it up with our dominant hand.

    What, both at the same time? 😜

    Oooh - do I have to design a loving kettle for tea drinkers?
  • MrsBeakyMrsBeaky Shipmate
    Spike wrote: »
    Cathscats wrote: »
    Old electric kettles definitely did not switch themselves off. In my student days I used to boil eggs in mine.

    I used to have a Kenyan flatmate who would make tea in one of them. He would put water, teabags, milk & sugar in the kettle and boil them all up together. Apparently, that’s how they did it in Kenya. It tasted disgusting.

    When I lived in Kenya they did boil it all up together but in a pan over a charcoal burner, not in a kettle 🙃 and most of my Kenyan friends did not include the sugar, letting people add their own to their cup. However tea in a village visit would nearly always include the sugar as it was too expensive to let people add their own.
    An electric kettle which didn't switch off got my husband thrown out of uni digs when he left it to boil dry and destroyed a kitchen worktop 😂
  • These conversations are why I wish we had little photos next to what we're describing. Some of this sounds like the newest latest and greatest doohickey which my Vietnamese church has added to their tea-and=Bible study after church, replacing the trek upstairs for hot water, or the Zojirushi hot pot. Some of it sounds wholly unpicturable.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    FWIW this is the style of electric kettle of my youth. Later models came with a thermostatic off switch. And this is a contemporary electric jug kettle with a 360° base. Modern electric kettles (almost) all come with automatic off switches which operate when the water boils.
  • This is a hot pot. here
  • SparrowSparrow Shipmate
    I remember the old kettles that were boiled on the stove top, and the whistle I used to like to take off and blow through.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    A bit like this?
  • This is a hot pot. here
    That’s a really fancy hot pot. This is what I think of when I think of a hot pot. (It’s what I had in my dorm room.)


  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    That’s a really fancy hot pot. This is what I think of when I think of a hot pot. (It’s what I had in my dorm room.)

    That picture took me right back to an early 1980s dorm room!
  • Hot pots in our context (Vietnamese immigrants) need to be always ready to give you boiling water. Ours sits next to the sink always full and hot (refill when it's getting low). It makes good sense for a household that runs on tea and instant noodles etc.
  • Ah, makes sense. Thanks!
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Purgatory Host, Circus Host
    BroJames wrote: »
    A bit like this?

    My parents still have one of those. They work well if you have a gas stove, not so good with electric.
  • ArethosemyfeetArethosemyfeet Shipmate
    edited January 25
    This is a hot pot. here

    Looks like halfway between a kettle and a small urn.
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