Strange Little things people do.

HugalHugal Shipmate
On my train this morning there was a passenger who had a big coat on, a scarf and a woolly hat. She is obviously cold. As soon as she got on the train she opened a window letting the heat out and the cold in. What strange small behaviours have we seen people do?
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  • HugalHugal Shipmate
    Dear mod could you please change the title to People are Strange as I was half asleep this morning when started the thread
  • Maybe she was ill and wanted to increase ventilation to avoid spreading germs?
  • If we're going to start cataloguing unusual behavior choices, I'm probably going to have to start with myself. I imagine many of the things I do look odd to random passers-by.
  • edited February 23
    I find people who sit on trains and buses surrounded by unmasked coughers and splutterers and don't open the windows a bit odd.
  • ArielAriel Shipmate
    edited February 23
    Really hate when people get on at the front and open a window. When the bus is in motion the airflow is such that if you're near the back, the strength of it can intensify to near gale by the time it reaches you, when the person next to the open window experiences only a mild breeze. I used to hate this on morning commutes. And for some reason the person who opens the window never wants to swop seats.

    Commutes can be sources of strange behaviour. Memorable moments include but are not limited to:
    * Someone eating a large bowl of porridge that she'd brought with her.
    * Someone filing her nails, all the way from Oxford to London, half an hour to do one hand then another thirty minutes to do the other.
    * To judge by the debris on one commute someone had been clipping his toenails.
    * A young football fan getting on the train at 7.30 am, reaching into a carrier bag for a can of beer, and methodically drinking his way through pint after pint, until we reached London.
    * Someone had his hair cut on the platform by his partner while waiting for a train. No, they didn't clear it up afterwards.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Reminds me of very funny sketch I saw years ago in Vancouver - a woman on a train simultaneously getting dressed under her dressing gown meanwhile holding a phone conversation with her office. Given how some people seem to treat the commute as an extension of their bathroom/own private phone booth not that exaggerated.
  • Maybe she was ill and wanted to increase ventilation to avoid spreading germs?
    If ‘twere me, the desire for fresh air over stuffy air regularly outweighs the desire to be warm. Perhaps she was so wrapped up because she knew she’d want fresh air.

    Strangeness may often be in the eye of the beholder, and may be rooted in that beholder’s lack of all relevant information.

  • The_RivThe_Riv Shipmate
    edited February 23
    I've always thought it odd that some people blow their noses, and then study the used tissue contents intently. Makes me wonder if they may somehow be thinking about not throwing it in the bin.
  • I don't know about "intently" (ewwww!) but I do usually take a quick look at such things just to be sure there's no blood. This time. Which tells you way too much about my medical history.
  • SparrowSparrow Shipmate
    I was on a London Underground train a few years ago with a woman who started flossing her teeth.
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    When someone comes up to a public lift door on the ground floor and presses the UP button, waits 30 seconds and presses it again. Another person comes up and presses the same button, then a third who also presses the UP button. The first person steps forward and presses the button again. (Not even a minute has passed.) The lift arrives, the doors open and everyone smiles at one another as if they have achieved some shared feat.

    I do this myself. Is it a residual habit from needing to make sure I've pressed for a particular floor or to check that the lift is working? If I go up to stand next to someone waiting for a lift, I know they will have pressed the button. I know that pressing it again won't make the lift ascend or descend any faster. But I still step forward and push the button.
  • TurquoiseTasticTurquoiseTastic Kerygmania Host
    Yes, I have noticed this. Perhaps it is a subconsciously a way of communicating your destination without speaking, so that other people know when to expect you to leave?
  • MaryLouise wrote: »
    When someone comes up to a public lift door on the ground floor and presses the UP button, waits 30 seconds and presses it again. Another person comes up and presses the same button, then a third who also presses the UP button. The first person steps forward and presses the button again. (Not even a minute has passed.) The lift arrives, the doors open and everyone smiles at one another as if they have achieved some shared feat.

    I do this myself. Is it a residual habit from needing to make sure I've pressed for a particular floor or to check that the lift is working? If I go up to stand next to someone waiting for a lift, I know they will have pressed the button. I know that pressing it again won't make the lift ascend or descend any faster. But I still step forward and push the button.

    I admit to having done the opposite sort of thing with a group of people, all of us waiting outside a room waiting for someone to unlock the door not realizing that the door was already unlocked...

    Actually come to think of it I'm pretty sure I've done this with an elevator too, where everyone assumes that someone else has pressed the call button... :wink:
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    I was on an almost full train and congratulating myself on having an empty seat beside me when a man caught the train at the very last minute and sat down beside me. He said that he had just missed the bus to Glasgow, thus forcing him to catch the train instead. Checking the timetable he realised that the train left 10 minutes after the bus, but arrived in Glasgow 15 minutes earlier.

    All was well till we stopped at Stonehaven station and, apparently panicked, he asked me "Why are we stopping? The bus doesn't stop at Stonehaven! If I'd caught the bus I wouldn't be delayed by a stop at Stonehaven!"

    I reminded him that he'd still get to Glasgow 15 minutes ahead of the bus.

    We then stopped at Laurencekirk. Same panic, same questions, same reassurance.

    Rinse and repeat at Montrose, Arbroath, Carnoustie. By Dundee he started rocking back and forth when we stopped, and by Perth he started keening. By this time the train was standing room only and I was seriously contemplating standing just get away from him.

    As we approached Stirling my stress levels were rising in anticipation of the panic / rocking / keening / same questions.

    I've no idea what was going through his head. He wasn't disputing that he'd get there faster by train but just said "but the bus wouldn't keep stopping. Why does the train keep stopping???"

    I have rarely been so glad to see Glasgow Queen Street Station.
  • DoublethinkDoublethink Admin, 8th Day Host
    edited February 24
    That sounds like a neuro-diverse person becoming overwhelmed having had an unexpected change and then being in a sensorially intense environment (v busy v noisy etc). Thank you for being polite and supportive to him.
  • That sounds like a neuro-diverse person becoming overwhelmed having had an unexpected change and then being in a sensorially intense environment (v busy v noisy etc). Thank you for being polite and supportive to him.

    This.

    I sympathise with the chap, though I don't think I'd have been quite as discombobulated. Well done @North East Quine.
  • That sounds like a neuro-diverse person becoming overwhelmed having had an unexpected change and then being in a sensorially intense environment (v busy v noisy etc). Thank you for being polite and supportive to him.

    This.

    I sympathise with the chap, though I don't think I'd have been quite as discombobulated. Well done @North East Quine.

    @North East Quine This was my thought, too. As the parent of an autistic person, I recognize your seat-neighbour's distress. I am grateful to those people in my son's world who help him navigate uncomfortable situations. Thanks for being one of the people who would do that for him!
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    The_Riv wrote: »
    I've always thought it odd that some people blow their noses, and then study the used tissue contents intently. Makes me wonder if they may somehow be thinking about not throwing it in the bin.

    "A peek to see if he got anything interesting."

    Can anyone name the book? Hint: It's a scene portraying a job interview.
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    That sounds like a neuro-diverse person becoming overwhelmed having had an unexpected change and then being in a sensorially intense environment (v busy v noisy etc). Thank you for being polite and supportive to him.

    Do you know, that hadn't actually occurred to me, but it seems obvious now. At every stop we had to go back through the "but you'll still get there 15 minutes earlier, and Queen Street Station is very close to Buchanan Bus Station, so you'll be in almost the same place."
  • CameronCameron Shipmate
    That sounds like a neuro-diverse person becoming overwhelmed having had an unexpected change and then being in a sensorially intense environment (v busy v noisy etc). Thank you for being polite and supportive to him.
    Do you know, that hadn't actually occurred to me, but it seems obvious now. At every stop we had to go back through the "but you'll still get there 15 minutes earlier, and Queen Street Station is very close to Buchanan Bus Station, so you'll be in almost the same place."

    Thank you @North East Quine and @Doublethink for this exchange. It made me realise that I would not know what to do if someone was having a meltdown, and so I found this advice from the Autism Society.
  • It is excellent advice.

    I had a meltdown in one of our local Co-Ops, early in the first lockdown, when I was the victim of aggression from a knobhead who thought social distancing was for cowards...

    Fortunately, he fled the store before any real harm was done, but the other shoppers were clearly at a loss. The manager was called, and he quite quickly helped me to calm down.
  • CameronCameron Shipmate
    Sorry to hear you had that experience, @Bishops Finger - sadly the lockdowns showed us just how thoughtless some folks can be.

    Meanwhile, back at strange little things people do: At the gym* I have recently noticed several people using treadmills by walking backwards on them.

    Are they taking advanced royal audience training?

    ———

    * I am working on changing the resonant frequency of my flab-wobble.
  • DoublethinkDoublethink Admin, 8th Day Host
    It’s been popularised by kneesovertoesguy as a way of strengthening your knees and treating knee pain.
  • CameronCameron Shipmate
    Thanks @Doublethink - I may even give it a try in that case.

    (One knee sometimes gives me trouble, interfering with the possibility of running… or accelerated ambling, to be more honest about the speed.)
  • DoublethinkDoublethink Admin, 8th Day Host
    He has a YouTube channel that is worth a look - I find his presentational style annoying, but reviews by physios say his information is pretty solid,
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Cameron wrote: »
    ... accelerated ambling ...
    Love it! :mrgreen:
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Hugal wrote: »
    On my train this morning there was a passenger who had a big coat on, a scarf and a woolly hat. She is obviously cold. As soon as she got on the train she opened a window letting the heat out and the cold in. What strange small behaviours have we seen people do?

    Train windows don't open on suburban and outer suburban services in the Sydney, Newcastle, Blue Mountains and Wollongong area as all trains are air-conditioned. I think that's also true of the tram/light rail in the city centre and surrounding areas, but I can't quickly find any detail on that. There are next to no other passenger trains in NSW but those few are also air-conditioned.
  • Windows don’t open on sububan light rail. As with everything else, woe betide you if aircon is out of order
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Sojourner wrote: »
    Windows don’t open on sububan light rail. As with everything else, woe betide you if aircon is out of order

    Indeed, but it's a long time since I was on a suburban train where the windows would not open and/or the aircon failed.
  • I once saw a woman driving well over the speed limit on the Beltway (Washington, DC). As she sped past the car I was riding in, my friend and I saw that she was using her car's cigarette lighter to charge a curling iron! She was driving with her left hand on the steering wheel and her right hand was holding the curling iron. We were horrified and amused but my friend decided it might be wise to slow down a bit and let her drive on past us. Luckily, we weren't on the Beltway for much longer. We were nervous for ourselves and all the other people who were near her.
  • On the MARTA (Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority) train from downtown Atlanta to the suburbs, I was halfway down one car and heard screams of disgust and whooping laughter. People were jumping out of their seats and fleeing backwards even as the train rolled on. I leaned out of my seat to see what the commotion was and then I too, was fleeing for the back of the subway car. A man was standing in the aisle in front of the doors with his pants down around his ankles, calming crapping on the floor!

    It was so disgusting. When the train pulled into the next station, everyone poured out onto the platform. I ran down to another car, and jumped on. 🤮
  • The5thMary wrote: »
    On the MARTA (Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority) train from downtown Atlanta to the suburbs, I was halfway down one car and heard screams of disgust and whooping laughter. People were jumping out of their seats and fleeing backwards even as the train rolled on. I leaned out of my seat to see what the commotion was and then I too, was fleeing for the back of the subway car. A man was standing in the aisle in front of the doors with his pants down around his ankles, calming crapping on the floor!

    It was so disgusting. When the train pulled into the next station, everyone poured out onto the platform. I ran down to another car, and jumped on. 🤮

    Oh my! Just out of interest ... can this person's behaviour be explained in any way using the 'neurodiverse' mantra? Would I, had I been there, handed him a 'Baby Wipe'? How does one respond with love to these sorts of situations?
  • ArielAriel Shipmate
    RockyRoger wrote: »
    Oh my! Just out of interest ... can this person's behaviour be explained in any way using the 'neurodiverse' mantra? Would I, had I been there, handed him a 'Baby Wipe'? How does one respond with love to these sorts of situations?

    Love isn't always appropriate. Some people are on drugs, some people get off on these kinds of situations.

    Having said that, during one morning commute a drunk staggered into our train carriage, having clearly been up all night boozing, banged on the end door looking for the toilet, didn't find it, so relieved himself noisily and at some length on the vestibule floor and then crashed out in a seat.

    The surprising thing was that when we got to the station nobody seemed bothered, they just squelched through it and went on their way. I got the station staff to remove him from the train, as I was concerned he might do something worse on the rest of the journey. They took him away, cleaned up the floor and off we went.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    RockyRoger wrote: »
    The5thMary wrote: »
    On the MARTA (Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority) train from downtown Atlanta to the suburbs, I was halfway down one car and heard screams of disgust and whooping laughter. People were jumping out of their seats and fleeing backwards even as the train rolled on. I leaned out of my seat to see what the commotion was and then I too, was fleeing for the back of the subway car. A man was standing in the aisle in front of the doors with his pants down around his ankles, calming crapping on the floor!

    It was so disgusting. When the train pulled into the next station, everyone poured out onto the platform. I ran down to another car, and jumped on. 🤮

    Oh my! Just out of interest ... can this person's behaviour be explained in any way using the 'neurodiverse' mantra?

    Unlikely; profound learning disabilities might but I wouldn't expect someone that badly impaired to be using public transport on their own. Mental illness or brain damage possibly?

    Incidentally why do you use the phrase "'neurodiverse' mantra"?

  • BoogieBoogie Heaven Host
    KarlLB wrote: »

    Incidentally why do you use the phrase "'neurodiverse' mantra"?

    I wondered the same.

    Re: the poo-er, I'd suspect drugs.

  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    edited February 27
    Back in the 1990s I was at a pre-Vespers recital in Westminster Cathedral with a female friend. During the final piece we gradually became aware of quickening heavy breathing behind us. My friend, more curious than me, looked round, shot to her feet and moved into the aisle just before some liquid landed on the seat she'd been occupying. 🤮

    Who chooses to "pleasure themselves" in an organ recital? 😱
  • ArielAriel Shipmate
    edited February 27
    Well, it was an "organ" recital, just not the one you expected! (Sorry)

    It has been known in churches (Pepys, for one), though more often on public transport.
  • Hmm ... these sorts of behaviours are surely not suitable for sharing in heaven? People are indeed very strange. Can we talk about nice odd behaviour? Please.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    'Strange' usually is disturbing in some way, or we wouldn't find it strange.
  • RockyRoger wrote: »
    The5thMary wrote: »
    On the MARTA (Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority) train from downtown Atlanta to the suburbs, I was halfway down one car and heard screams of disgust and whooping laughter. People were jumping out of their seats and fleeing backwards even as the train rolled on. I leaned out of my seat to see what the commotion was and then I too, was fleeing for the back of the subway car. A man was standing in the aisle in front of the doors with his pants down around his ankles, calming crapping on the floor!

    It was so disgusting. When the train pulled into the next station, everyone poured out onto the platform. I ran down to another car, and jumped on. 🤮

    Oh my! Just out of interest ... can this person's behaviour be explained in any way using the 'neurodiverse' mantra? Would I, had I been there, handed him a 'Baby Wipe'? How does one respond with love to these sorts of situations?


    Nope. He was drunk. I used to see him on the train quite frequently and he always reeked of alcohol. One time MARTA security hauled him off the train because he was playing with himself and attempting to sing.
  • Not a nice person to come across, but my enquiring mind would want to know just why he was so often drunk, and badly behaved.

    There must be a back story - there usually is.
    Firenze wrote: »
    'Strange' usually is disturbing in some way, or we wouldn't find it strange.

    Very true, and strange behaviour may not always be threatening, abusive, or whatever, though witnessing it can disturb the otherwise even tenor of one's day.

  • Maybe you're looking for "odd," as in the guy who carries a rooster onto the subway every morning.
  • Yes - *odd* is a good word.
    :wink:
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Maybe you're looking for "odd," as in the guy who carries a rooster onto the subway every morning.

    Can't he get an alarm clock like everyone else?

  • Firenze wrote: »
    Maybe you're looking for "odd," as in the guy who carries a rooster onto the subway every morning.

    Can't he get an alarm clock like everyone else?

    :lol:

    He thought they meant an *alarm cock *...

    I'll get me coat.
  • ArielAriel Shipmate
    Firenze wrote: »
    Maybe you're looking for "odd," as in the guy who carries a rooster onto the subway every morning.

    Can't he get an alarm clock like everyone else?

    :lol:

    He thought they meant an *alarm cock *...

    I'll get me coat.

    😂 I'm restraining myself from saying the obvious here...
    Maybe you're looking for "odd," as in the guy who carries a rooster onto the subway every morning.

    I did hear of a man on the London Underground who had a rat that had a seat to itself next to him. Neither of them seemed the approachable sort, and so even when the carriage was packed to standing room only, nobody ever quite dared to ask for the rat to move so they could sit down.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited February 27
    Our Town used thave a Sunday morning market, which had a Man and his Shoulder-Rat as regular attenders.

    Both Man and Rat were well-behaved, although it is not recorded that the Rat ever bought anything...he dined well on scraps, however...
  • When I was in my teens we had a sweet gentleman from somewhere in India, I think--at least, that was his style of dress, with a turban too if I remember correctly. He would visit our Lutheran church on Sundays about ten minutes before service started, while we're all sitting around chatting and waiting--walk up to the altar, bow deeply, and then walk out again. People were charmed.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited February 27
    Our Place used to have a Sikh gentleman (he was known to the local Sikh Gurdwara) who turned up on Saturdays (usually just after Mass), and sprinkled himself liberally with the contents of the holy water stoup in our porch.

    He would then plead in earnest tones for a supply of Bread and Milk...which we didn't keep in stock, though we did offer him a choice of the contents of our Food Bank collection box, just in case he was in actual need.

    I think he had a number of mental health issues, and (being a physically large man) he spooked some lady members of the congregation by giving them very gentle, but all-enveloping, bear-hugs...
  • Ariel wrote: »
    Well, it was an "organ" recital, just not the one you expected! (Sorry)

    Excuse me, but lowering the tone round here is my job, thank you. 😛

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