"Boy, you sure called THAT one!"

stetsonstetson Shipmate
I watched the movie The Boat That Rocked(a somewhat romanticized and ideologically suspect celebration of UK pirate-radio in the 1960s) shortly after it came out in 2009. At the end, text appears on the screen opining about what a great history rock-music has had, followed by images of various classic albums.

One of the supposedly iconic album-covers shown was something by Taylor Swift, and I remember thinking "Yep, someone at the parent conglomerate ordered them to do a product-placement for the latest flash-in-the-pan pop siren."

My fellow oracles are invited to confess further instances of outrageous malpractice.

Comments

  • I don't think you can call Taylor Swift a flash in the pan at this point (though in 2009 it may have been an open question).
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited March 14
    I don't think you can call Taylor Swift a flash in the pan at this point (though in 2009 it may have been an open question).

    That's the point of my story. In 2009, I thought Taylor Swift would be a flash in the pan. In 2024, it is obvious that she is anything but.

    (In case it wasn't clear, the idea of this thread is to post instances in which you made a prediction that was totally wrong. The phrase in the thread title is meant to be sarcastic.)
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    My dad watched Elvis's first TV appearance on the Ed Sullivan show in 1956. Dad, about the same age as Elvis and pursuing a much smaller-scale musical career on local radio and TV, thought, "This guy's going nowhere ... he can't even play the guitar that well." The phrase "flash in the pan" may have been used on that occasion too.

    Dad still references this to demonstrate that he has no prophetic abilities.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited March 14
    Trudy wrote: »
    My dad watched Elvis's first TV appearance on the Ed Sullivan show in 1956. Dad, about the same age as Elvis and pursuing a much smaller-scale musical career on local radio and TV, thought, "This guy's going nowhere ... he can't even play the guitar that well." The phrase "flash in the pan" may have been used on that occasion too.

    Dad still references this to demonstrate that he has no prophetic abilities.

    My dad hated rock videos when they first came to prominence in the 80s, but thought karaoke was s nifty innovation, and predicted over dinner at a restaurant one night that the former would die but the latter would flourish.

    Turned out he was wrong about videos, right about karaoke. I personally dislike both, for different reasons.
  • GwaiGwai Epiphanies Host
    When MTV was newer, I remember telling my friend that music videos were stupid and would be a flash in the pan. So much for that.
  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    Hedgehog, 2015: "Nobody would be so stupid as to vote for Donald Trump to be President."
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    Oh yeah, I think lots of us failed to call that one. The day before the 2016 election I told my boss, "I can't wait till tomorrow when he's lost the election and we never have to hear his name again."
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited March 14
    A political one I got right, but others got wrong...

    When Ralph Klein was still just a cabinet minister, I developed the formulation that his persona was the perfect balance of urban and rural for appealing to 1990s Alberta. When I suggested to a group of Tory activists I met at a party that the Conservatives should elect him their next leader, the response was a hearty "Oh, puh-leeze!"
  • MamacitaMamacita Shipmate
    Back to pop culture for a moment, one of the biggest arguments I had with my father was about the Beatles, who he said were "a fad, a flash in the pan." There was yelling, and probably tears, from my 15-y.o. self. Decades later, I think I was mature enough not to rub this in.
  • TwangistTwangist Shipmate
    Hedgehog wrote: »
    Hedgehog, 2015: "Nobody would be so stupid as to vote for Donald Trump to be President."

    That and the brexit vote.....
  • SpikeSpike Ecclesiantics & MW Host, Admin Emeritus
    Hedgehog wrote: »
    Hedgehog, 2015: "Nobody would be so stupid as to vote for Donald Trump to be President."

    That was me in 2019 about Boris Johnson. I even expected him to lose his parliamentary seat.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Mamacita wrote: »
    Back to pop culture for a moment, one of the biggest arguments I had with my father was about the Beatles, who he said were "a fad, a flash in the pan." There was yelling, and probably tears, from my 15-y.o. self. Decades later, I think I was mature enough not to rub this in.

    Just curious, but would you happen to recall at what point in The Beatles' career your dad said that? I'm assuming the mop-top rather than psychedelic era?
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    And...

    I watched what I think was the second episode(*) of Friends, and figured it was just one last desperate gasp of breath for the aimless-gen-Xer genre, and wouldn't last a month.

    (*) I just remember it ended with one of the male characters looking at his significant other's pregnancy through an ultrasound, and having what seemed like a maudlin epiphany about what's important in life(or something). But I don't recall from the rest of the show that any of characters had kids, so maybe that plot detail was focus-grouped out later on?
  • SpikeSpike Ecclesiantics & MW Host, Admin Emeritus
    Mamacita wrote: »
    Back to pop culture for a moment, one of the biggest arguments I had with my father was about the Beatles, who he said were "a fad, a flash in the pan." There was yelling, and probably tears, from my 15-y.o. self. Decades later, I think I was mature enough not to rub this in.

    They were turned down by Decca Records for much the same reason. Apparently, according to Decca, four piece groups with guitars were on the way out.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    stetson wrote: »
    And...

    I watched what I think was the second episode(*) of Friends, and figured it was just one last desperate gasp of breath for the aimless-gen-Xer genre, and wouldn't last a month.

    (*) I just remember it ended with one of the male characters looking at his significant other's pregnancy through an ultrasound, . . . .
    Former significant other, who had left him for a woman before the first episode.

    But I don't recall from the rest of the show that any of characters had kids, so maybe that plot detail was focus-grouped out later on?
    That kid appeared in numerous episodes, and by the final episode there had been seven babies born to or adopted by the main characters. (Granted, two were twins born and adopted in the last episode, and three were triplets that one character gave birth to as a surrogate for her brother and his wife. That’s how the writers dealt with the actress’s real-life pregnancy.) Other than the twins from the final episode, all were referred to and appeared at least occasionally in episodes after they were born, but only one actually lived with one of the main characters.

    :wink: (Yes, we watched “Friends.”)

  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    @Nick Tamen

    Thanks! Obviously, I never followed the show that closely. That one with the ultrasound might be the only one I watched in its entirety.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Not sure if I explicitly predicted that the movie would bomb, but when I fsaw the pre-release newspaper ads for Titanic, I remember thinking "Why would anyone bother making that?", given that that particular incident had been such a cliche part of popular culture for decades on end.

    (I eventually allowed myself to be dragged to a screening, enjoyed it while I was watching it, but didn't carry away much of a long-term impression. My witness to its cultural ascension took place mostly in Korea, where the film is very popular.)
  • AravisAravis Shipmate
    My father in law was a couple of years below David Hockney at school, and thought he was “very silly and always untidy, won’t stick at anything”.
  • ArielAriel Shipmate
    Me, 23 June 2016: "There will be some people who'll vote for Brexit but there won't be that many. It won't change anything."
    Me, 24 June 2016: 😶😮
  • NicoleMRNicoleMR Shipmate
    When the original Star Wars movie came out I was a teen. I saw the promotional stuff in the teen magazine I read at the time (Tiger Beat, for those who remember it), and decided that the movie was going to be not so good. When I actually saw it I was stunned!
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    NicoleMR wrote: »
    When the original Star Wars movie came out I was a teen. I saw the promotional stuff in the teen magazine I read at the time (Tiger Beat, for those who remember it), and decided that the movie was going to be not so good. When I actually saw it I was stunned!

    Yeah, the original Star Wars is probably one of those movies that would sound not particularly impressive if described in print. Standard good vs. evil, sword-and-sorcery BS.
  • DiomedesDiomedes Shipmate
    When I was in Junior School (probably when I was 10 or 11) one was expected to be in the Elvis camp - or the Cliff Richard camp. I remember being very vocal about the fact that Cliff Richard was an absolute non-starter. He's had an extraordinarily long career - how did that happen?!
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Diomedes wrote: »
    When I was in Junior School (probably when I was 10 or 11) one was expected to be in the Elvis camp - or the Cliff Richard camp. I remember being very vocal about the fact that Cliff Richard was an absolute non-starter. He's had an extraordinarily long career - how did that happen?!

    If it's any consolation, outside the UK, I don't think Cliff Richard ever achieved anywhere near the same levels of prominence and popularity that Elvis did. I think I only became aware of him in the late 90s or early 2000s, when hipsters started mocking him for recording Christian music, and con-evos then started holding him up as an example of how Christians are oppressed. And even that ginned-up controversy was, I think, confined largely to Old Blighty.
  • MamacitaMamacita Shipmate
    @stetson it was 1965. Definitely in their moptop stage and only an item in the US for a year or two.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited March 15
    Mamacita wrote: »
    @stetson it was 1965. Definitely in their moptop stage and only an item in the US for a year or two.

    I think I'd call that the tail-end of mop-top, actually, in terms of their overall artistic development. Rubber Soul was released that same year, and while that was arguably still mop-top(with the titular haircuts going strong), Revolver was the next year, and that's generally viewed as a definite departure.

    But, yes, your father was most likely reacting to existing perceptions of the band in North America.

    Still on music, in the early 1990s, the libertarian sex-and-culture guru Camille Paglia denounced 80s feminists for allegedly dismissing Paglia's hero Madonna, while championing "the flaky Cindy Lauper".

    I confess to being one of those who consciously cheered for Lauper against Madonna, though I'm not sure if I made any predictions one way or another. I suppose if you're someone like Paglia who extols the pagan-Catholic aspects of western art, Madonna's the obvious choice, but I'm not a huge fan of dance music, and Lauper's lyrics and personal style seemed to be saying something a little deeper.
  • Pretty much everything I have ever said?

    I do remember seeing a trailer for a film called "E.T. The ExtraTerrestrial" and thought it would never be any good - bound to be a flop.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    Pretty much everything I have ever said?

    I do remember seeing a trailer for a film called "E.T. The ExtraTerrestrial" and thought it would never be any good - bound to be a flop.

    I first became aware of that movie through newspaper ads, and seeing the name of the director probably fortified me against any speculation that the film would fail.

    I do remember being somewhat confused that that director's name was appearing at the same time on ads for Poltergeist(he was the producer), even though the two movies appeared to have no other connection with one another.
  • Self-driving cars? Don't be daft!
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host
    Self-driving cars? Don't be daft!

    I think the jury is very much still out on that one, and you may yet be right.
  • stetsonstetson Shipmate
    edited March 16
    Trudy wrote: »
    Self-driving cars? Don't be daft!

    I think the jury is very much still out on that one, and you may yet be right.

    I was gonna post something like this, but as a non-driver, didn't really feel confident enough to make a case.

    I will observe that I've heard authority-figures of whatever sort say stuff like "Well, even if it's self-driving, you still need to keep your eyes on the road and your hands near the wheel". Which, it seems to me, kind of defeats the whole purpose of a self-driving car.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Anyone remember Clarkson taking a "self-driving" car round the Top Gear track? Poor chap looked terrified, and I don't blame him.

    What's the point, if the thing scares you out of your wits?
  • ArielAriel Shipmate
    There are self driving buses on the business park I used to work on. Apparently they still need a human operator to supervise and get them past the roundabouts, though.

    And they probably always will need a human operator because of people. They will always be fare dodgers and people who should be given Asbos.
  • Ariel wrote: »
    There are self driving buses on the business park I used to work on. Apparently they still need a human operator to supervise and get them past the roundabouts, though.

    And they probably always will need a human operator because of people. They will always be fare dodgers and people who should be given Asbos.

    And people who drive like pillocks...
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