8th November?

I think the date's wrong....
if it was last Thursday, that was 11th august.
is that a problem with the date format?

http://shipoffools.com/mystery-worshipper/st-joan-of-arc-hershey-pennsylvania-usa/#side-meta

Comments

  • I wonder if it's confusing US and UK date nomenclature:

    11/8/18 = English nomenclature for 11th August 2018
    8/11/18 = USA nomenclature for 11th August 2018
  • O dear - two countries divided by a common language!

    (Oscar Wilde?)

    IJ
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    That may very well be it. The reporting form has drop-downs for the date selection. US reporters would naturally select the month first; UK reporters the day. I have corrected the report and will pay closer attention to the date in future reports.

    There is a similar problem with AM/PM. The original report had 5:00am but I did catch that one.
  • verity wrote: »
    I think the date's wrong....
    if it was last Thursday, that was 11th august.
    is that a problem with the date format?

    To quote the Head of my prep school on how to date things, using today as the example:

    Tuesday - day of the week
    21st - day of the month
    August - month of the year
    2018 - number of year (of Our Lord)

    And if that lot were all put together on one line then you'd get "Tuesday 21st August 2018" which makes sense.

    Whereas if you use the across-the-pond order you get "August Tuesday 21st (or August 21st Tuesday) 2018", neither of which makes any sense.
  • SipechSipech Shipmate
    There is a similar problem with AM/PM. The original report had 5:00am but I did catch that one.
    Sometimes, you may get an Easter morning service around that time.

    Then again, there is this!

  • Would any insomniac MWers like to volunteer to visit that one? 3am is rather illegal o'clock, IMHO, so count me out...
    :flushed:

    IJ
  • Not near to me so sorry - but then again, from reading the newspaper report it should be possible to do any MW visit from the comfort of a car, wrapped up warm with a thermos of something (soup!) and nibbles.
  • It looks as if the earliest service is now 7am on a Sunday morning and the latest midnight to 1am - every night that one.
  • Not near to me so sorry - but then again, from reading the newspaper report it should be possible to do any MW visit from the comfort of a car, wrapped up warm with a thermos of something (soup!) and nibbles.

    SOUP? Yes, but with a side flask of GIN as well, surely!

    Midnight to 1am would be Mattins and Lauds, I think, with Prime at 7am, no? Though their website seems to be unavailable at the moment.

    I'll get me cowl...

    IJ

  • SipechSipech Shipmate
    It's well within my "catchment area" though the last time I went to a pentecostal church in that area I left with no great desire to go back again.
  • Whereas if you use the across-the-pond order you get "August Tuesday 21st (or August 21st Tuesday) 2018", neither of which makes any sense.
    No, you don’t. You would never get either of those options over here. Ever.

    The standard order here is month/date/year. If the day of the week is to be included, it comes first: “Tuesday, August 21/21st, 2018.”



  • The federal governments in Canada in most documents and forms I see does 2018-08-22, sometimes 2018.08.22. Biggest to smallest. I personally date things in the format 22 Aug 2018. It is very difficult in Canada because we get both formats, and I've no idea what is what re month and day at times.

    {tangent}
    talked to a person visiting. I asked "are you on holidays?" to be told "no, I'm on vacation." I've had this said more than once, and I do not understand it.
    Nor what the time is if someone says "a quarter of 4", is "of" before or after the hour?
    {/tangent}
  • {tangent} Nor what the time is if someone says "a quarter of 4", is "of" before or after the hour?
    {/tangent}

    On the other hand, it always takes me a while to sort out if "half four" if half an hour before or after four.

  • The federal governments in Canada in most documents and forms I see does 2018-08-22, sometimes 2018.08.22.
    I typically date computer files, such as letters, that way so they’ll automatically sort by date
    {tangent}
    talked to a person visiting. I asked "are you on holidays?" to be told "no, I'm on vacation." I've had this said more than once, and I do not understand it.
    Here, if you said “holidays,” many people would assume you mean “are you away from work or school because of a holiday?,” by which they would mean Christmas/New Year’s, Thanksgiving, the Fourth of July, etc. Of course, many others of us would know that “holiday/holidays” means what we’d call “vacation.”
    Nor what the time is if someone says "a quarter of 4", is "of" before or after the hour?
    {/tangent}
    Before. “Quarter of 4” and “quarter after 4” are common around here. Or were; they seem to be less so these days. Blame digital clocks.

  • OblatusOblatus Shipmate
    edited August 22
    Whereas if you use the across-the-pond order you get "August Tuesday 21st (or August 21st Tuesday) 2018", neither of which makes any sense.

    Tuesday, August 21, 2018.
  • Jengie JonJengie Jon Shipmate
    edited August 22
    The federal governments in Canada in most documents and forms I see does 2018-08-22, sometimes 2018.08.22. Biggest to smallest. I personally date things in the format 22 Aug 2018. It is very difficult in Canada because we get both formats, and I've no idea what is what re month and day at times.

    The 2018-08-22 is the historic computer date stamp way. If you sort identically named files apart from that date stamp they sort themselves into the correct order regardless of minor accidental amendments. I use this convention when data stamping files for just this reason but do not always bother with the dashes or dots.

  • AndrasAndras Shipmate
    Why not date everything by the relevant ecclesiastical festivals, such as Tuesday after the First Sunday in Lent. That should cause a whole lot of fun...
  • Andras wrote: »
    Why not date everything by the relevant ecclesiastical festivals, such as Tuesday after the First Sunday in Lent. That should cause a whole lot of fun...
    But would we use the calendar that includes Septuagesima, Sexagesima, and Quinquagesima? And The Sunday Next Before Advent? What about Gaudete and Laetare?
    :wink:

  • The Parish church in Epsom used to refer to "the Sunday before The Derby" and "the Sunday after The Derby" ... :grin:
  • The Parish church in Epsom used to refer to "the Sunday before The Derby" and "the Sunday after The Derby" ... :grin:

    In the U.S., I believe some people think that Superbowl Sunday should be on the liturgical calendar. (Churches know better than to schedule things like Annual Parish Meetings on that holiest day of the year.)
  • Andras wrote: »
    Why not date everything by the relevant ecclesiastical festivals, such as Tuesday after the First Sunday in Lent. That should cause a whole lot of fun...

    I once took to analysing the data that occurred in the weeks in which the Scottish Quarter day fell. So you got Martinmas (11th November), Candlemas (2nd February), Whitsun(15th May?) and Lammas (1st August). This caused confusion in a very secular English university. There was a good reason for it. Those weeks sort of fell in the nondescript parts of the year so when looking for the difference between the various terms and summer vacation you could do it with those weeks.
  • Andras wrote: »
    Why not date everything by the relevant ecclesiastical festivals, such as Tuesday after the First Sunday in Lent. That should cause a whole lot of fun...

    In ages past people would date things by major festivals and saints' days.
  • Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    On the other hand, it always takes me a while to sort out if "half four" if half an hour before or after four.

    In English, or in German? :wink:

    My preference, when writing dates for humans, is to write "Aug" or "August" for the month, so there's no ambiguity. Otherwise, dates are ISO8601, although I'll insert my usual complaint about how times should be based on TAI rather than UTC.
  • Re "on holidays" vs. "on vacation"--the person is probably taking "holiday" as a reference to a culture-wide reason-for-days-off such as Christmas. His/her reply means "No, there's no holiday to explain why I'm not working--it's just a personal vacation."
  • Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    On the other hand, it always takes me a while to sort out if "half four" if half an hour before or after four.

    In English, or in German? :wink:

    If I recall correctly it is difference between types of English. In my family British English and South African English.
  • AndrasAndras Shipmate
    Jengie Jon wrote: »
    Andras wrote: »
    Why not date everything by the relevant ecclesiastical festivals, such as Tuesday after the First Sunday in Lent. That should cause a whole lot of fun...

    I once took to analysing the data that occurred in the weeks in which the Scottish Quarter day fell. So you got Martinmas (11th November), Candlemas (2nd February), Whitsun(15th May?) and Lammas (1st August). This caused confusion in a very secular English university. There was a good reason for it. Those weeks sort of fell in the nondescript parts of the year so when looking for the difference between the various terms and summer vacation you could do it with those weeks.

    Sadly, Lammas as a Church Festival seems to have disappeared round here.
  • Whitsun, also known as Pentecost, moves. It is linked to Easter, as in it occurs 7 weeks later, and this year was June 9th. What is now the late May Bank Holiday used to be the Whitsun Bank Holiday, but became fixed in 1971 breaking the link with the church feast.

    I've come across Lammas services locally. Not sure if they are still happening.
  • That is the reason for the question mark after the date. The date I used is a legal setting of the date.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Andras wrote: »
    Why not date everything by the relevant ecclesiastical festivals, such as Tuesday after the First Sunday in Lent. That should cause a whole lot of fun...

    In ages past people would date things by major festivals and saints' days.
    I think it was Bishop Ryle - or some equally Evangelical Victorian - who reacted against the Anglo-Catholic clerical taste of heading their correspondence as "The Rectory, St. Vitus' Day" by writing "The Bishop's Palace, Washday".

  • Holidays for any time off work/school down here.

    Meanwhile, this Jesus will be stuck liturgically in Ordinary Time for quite a while.
  • Whitsun, also known as Pentecost, moves. It is linked to Easter, as in it occurs 7 weeks later, and this year was June 9th. What is now the late May Bank Holiday used to be the Whitsun Bank Holiday, but became fixed in 1971 breaking the link with the church feast.

    Whitsun was always a fixed date in Scotland. It was the day on which feu duty was paid. Pentecost was religious, Whitsun was legal.
  • What is feu duty, sorry?
  • Feu duty was an annual payment to your feudal superior. You could redeem it by paying a lump sum which was a multiple of the annual amount. It was abolished in 2004, but had ceased to be meaningful before that, as so many had been redeemed, and because inflation had eroded many feu duties to the point that they weren't worth collecting.

    When I was a kid, my parents had a discussion every May as to whether they should pay the feu duty or redeem it.

    Titles to land (including individual houses) all had feudal conditions. For example, if your feudal superior was the Church of Scotland, there would be a prohibition on making or selling alcohol. The feu duty was stipulated in the title deeds.
  • Another Scottish dating quirk is that Scotland used to have a "legal year" in much the same way as the tax year runs from April to April. The legal year differed from the calendar year. For example, in the Aberdeen witch trials, the witches were arrested in Sept / Oct 1596 and tried / executed / banished in February 1596. February 1596 was the tail end of legal year year 1596.

    I don't know when the legal year and the calendar year synchronised.
  • That was the case in England too - I would have to go and look it up, but when I was digging through medieval documents we got caught a couple of times by the calendar year and document year being different in a similar way. Regnal years was another such wrinkle.
  • There's a lot who date the start of the year to Labour Day (03 Sept this year). This is the end of summer, the time to expect frost, the end of gardening, the start of the school year, the turning off of the outside-the-house water lines (they will freeze and burst).

    I've liked the arbitrary and variable end of the fall season being the freeze up of lakes. There are multiple ice pans tinkling and swashing together, and then in very short order while you watch if you're there when it happens, they just get glue-frozen together and things become quiet. "Mikiskāw" in Cree, one of the 6 seasons in this local tradition.
  • There's a lot who date the start of the year to Labour Day (03 Sept this year).
    Churches, theater companies, symphonies/operas, etc. start their "seasons" in September -- probably based on the school year. Season tickets for most performing arts groups (not talking about summer festivals obviously) will run from early fall through late spring. Church activities, especially church school, will run concurrent with the school year. Performing arts companies will also often have their "fiscal year" run from July 1 through June 30 (or in keeping with this thread topic, 1 July through 30 June).
  • And of course the liturgical calendar of the Orthodox runs from September 1 to August 31.
  • Thank you North East Quine.
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    Performing arts companies will also often have their "fiscal year" run from July 1 through June 30 (or in keeping with this thread topic, 1 July through 30 June).
    Which is our tax / financial year down here.

  • ZappaZappa Ecclesiantics Host
    whereas I think ours starts, inexplicably, on April 1.
  • Zappa wrote: »
    whereas I think ours starts, inexplicably, on April 1.
    Are you fooling us?
    :wink:

  • CarysCarys Shipmate
    Zappa wrote: »
    whereas I think ours starts, inexplicably, on April 1.

    It isn't inexplicable, just slightly complicated! So historically it started on Lady Day (25th March) but when we eventually changed to the Gregorian Calendar (In I think 1753), the tax year was kept to being the same length, so it shifted to April 5th (give us back our 11 days). Then in recent years people have decided it makes more sense to start on the first of the the month.
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